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How to deal with puppies’ suffocation?
  1. #1
    xumeng12 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    44

    Default How to deal with puppies’ suffocation?

    Puppy dogs are very likely to get suffocated when eating something. In extreme conditions, sudden suffocation may cause breath stops or even death. How should we do to deal it? When you find your pet dog try really hard to stretch its neck and scratch its mouth with paws, something like food may be stuck in its throat. When it happens, you can pat the pet’s back to help it spit stuck items out. If it still does not work, you have to take it to a doctor as soon as possible. Sometimes, grown-up dogs’ throats can be stuck by bones or others, the first aid could be same with puppies.
    r12a12 likes this.

  2. #2
    Aaliah thomas is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    5

    Default Pet owners education

    Quote Originally Posted by xumeng12 View Post
    Puppy dogs are very likely to get suffocated when eating something. In extreme conditions, sudden suffocation may cause breath stops or even death. How should we do to deal it? When you find your pet dog try really hard to stretch its neck and scratch its mouth with paws, something like food may be stuck in its throat. When it happens, you can pat the pet’s back to help it spit stuck items out. If it still does not work, you have to take it to a doctor as soon as possible. Sometimes, grown-up dogs’ throats can be stuck by bones or others, the first aid could be same with puppies.

    Keeping a puppy is somewhat same as adopting a small child or sometimes even more difficult. It's very important that the owners are well educated about the needs of the puppy and precautions to be taken for keeping it sound and healthy. I searched some sites on net which would help the pet owners in getting appropriate knowledge about their pets.

    http://parents.berkeley.edu/advice/pets/outsidedog.html
    http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/.../ucm047099.htm

    Pet owners can go through these sites and can overcome the difficulties faced by them in handling with the pets.
    r12a12 likes this.

  3. #3
    r12a12 is offline New Member
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    Jun 2011
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    Canada
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    Default

    May I suggest when thinking of getting a new addition to your family. To think of a rescue, shelter and so-on. There are so many lost souls, waiting just to be loved, and wanting so much to give their love to you..............

  4. #4
    PeterRabbit2 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    667

    Default

    Once, my sister's dog Mosley was choking, I reached about 2cm into his trachea with a hooked index finger and removed the foreign object. It was a ping-pong ball. I'd forced his mouth open wide and seen the ball.

    The scary part was, I had to wait till he blacked out to avoid getting bitten (the dog was a Rottweiler). After a large dog blacks out you have less than 2 minutes before brain damage starts to occur. In toy breeds, the time to brain damage is less than 1 minute, post blackout. Act FAST!

    I did mouth to snout resuscitation and in one breath, the dog regained consciousness. He lived to the ripe old age of 16.
    Last edited by PeterRabbit2; 06-13-2011 at 07:48 AM.
    Peter

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