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3 weeks on percocet. Withdrawl?
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    babeston is offline New Member
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    Default 3 weeks on percocet. Withdrawl?

    Im curious of I could be dependant on percocet after 3 weeks [it will be 4 tomorrow] of use. I take up to 15-30 mg a day for back problems. In the morning, when I wake up, I tend to feel a bit depressed....kind of like I would if I had been drinking the night before. Anyways, Im wondering if it is too soon to go through withdrawl? I took these several months ago for the same problem [have a new job now that aggravates my back bad and had to start back up using them again] and after I stopped, I had withdrawl. Any advice would be appreciated.

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    mottam is offline Advanced Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by babeston View Post
    Im curious of I could be dependant on percocet after 3 weeks [it will be 4 tomorrow] of use. I take up to 15-30 mg a day for back problems. In the morning, when I wake up, I tend to feel a bit depressed....kind of like I would if I had been drinking the night before. Anyways, Im wondering if it is too soon to go through withdrawl? I took these several months ago for the same problem [have a new job now that aggravates my back bad and had to start back up using them again] and after I stopped, I had withdrawl. Any advice would be appreciated.
    Sometimes we get our answers by asking our own questions. Read above: "I took these several months ago for the same problem [have a new job now that aggravates my back bad and had to start back up using them again] and after I stopped, I had withdrawl." Now, go back to your original question. I am NOT a doc, nor am I a recovery professional. I am simply an addict in recovery and I "listen" to the words of all questions at fellowship meetings (or posts on here).

    Now, withdrawal does NOT mean you are an addict, if you used them as prescribed, for as long as prescribed. If you took more, longer, to get a buzz, etc., then you crossed over to the dark side. Pain stinks. Treating pain w/ opiates is how SO MANY of the people on this forum got addicted. Be very careful. In the end best of luck. Use some OTC meds, stretching, exercise, etc. to address your pain if you can.

    Kindest Regards
    mottam
    Persistency is consistency

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    babeston is offline New Member
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    Thank you. Trust me when I say, I didnt go back to taking them lightly. I thought it over long and hard before renewing my prescription. I sat with the pill in hand for much longer. I have used the hot baths, heating pads, etc. Nothing OTC touches it. Ive had migraines all my life, so i guess the OTC stuff is just worthless for me now.

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    Invisible_Girl is offline Junior Member
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    I am a fellow migraine sufferer and addict. I know OTC meds don't TOUCH a migraine for me and neither did most opiates, but I have found that taking a towel, wrapping it around my head and using a stick to tighten it down like a tourniquet helps relieve some of the pain. It's not comfortable by any means, but it is much more tolerable than the migraine pain, and it really does help to alleviate it some. I also use ice packs on my eyes and the top of my head (under the towel) and that seems to help too. It's nothing miraculous, but I hope it helps some with the migraines.

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    ARTIST658 is offline Platinum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by babeston View Post
    Thank you. Trust me when I say, I didnt go back to taking them lightly. I thought it over long and hard before renewing my prescription. I sat with the pill in hand for much longer. I have used the hot baths, heating pads, etc. Nothing OTC touches it. Ive had migraines all my life, so i guess the OTC stuff is just worthless for me now.

    Dear Babeston,

    There's a significant difference between drug dependency and drug addiction. With drug dependency, our body has adjusted to the drug, so that we do feel withdrawal symptoms when we stop. Depression is a common sign. But once we get past that first few days, the problem is done.

    Drug addiction also includes the mental/emotional piece. When cravings occur, that's a clear hallmark of addiction.

    By the way, I've also struggled with chronic migraines all my life. That's where I slipped rather innocently into addiction. Back when I was young, doctors routinely prescribed narcotics for migraines - and in time, I became addicted. During those years, OTC meds did nothing to help my pain. Since I've been in recovery from drug addiction, the migraines have diminished tremendously - and OTC meds can now do the trick. I've come to realize, over the years, that this was my disease in action, unbeknownst to me. I could not handle emotional pain, and suppressed it - and it became physical pain (migraines). Then I would be compelled to turn to a narcotic painkiller to ease it. I stayed stuck in that cycle for decades. On top of it, I had ongoing rebound headaches all the time - a side effect of taking either narcotic or OTC meds routinely. It was only in recovery from drug addiction, working a 12-step program and dealing with the unpleasant emotions I used to suppress - that the migraines have lessened and the "need" for narcotics vanished.

    Just thought that may help you in some way - addiction is quite common in chronic pain patients. And it happens all so quietly that we don't see it coming.

    God bless,

    Ruth

    You will know the truth - and only the truth can set you free.

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    newyorkgal is offline Platinum Member
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    I firmly do not believe you can become addicted to a narcotic in 3 short weeks BUT and this is a big but......you can become dependent and be on the road to addiction after just 1 time. I say this because of my own beginning. I always tell people I became a junkie the first time I used. Why? Because the instant I felt the >>>>>> coursing through my brain and body, I know I loved the feeling so much (who knew then what that love affair would become).... I knew in the back of my head that first time, I swear, that there was nothing that was going to stop me from pursuing this feeling again and again....So, I could have stopped that day and addiction would have never been a part of my life but that wasn't gonna happen and sure enough, it didn't. So using for whatever reason is a slippery slope, especially for someone who knows what addiction is from prior use.

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    babeston is offline New Member
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    Guys, thank you all for everything you wrote. I remember the first perc I took for this issue a few months ago [it wasnt the first one I ever took- I had them for childbirth and surgeries, but what started this whole thing] and I remember the thought I had wasnt the high feeling, it was that for once....NOTHING hurt. I felt human. Normal. I thought "this is how most people feel all the time!" *sigh* How freakin sad is that? As far as depression, I take a generic for celexa for it. It doesnt take much for the chemicals in my brain to be knocked off kilter and start depression. Im a recovering alcoholic and I always hated that feeling in the morning: being depressed. Thank you for listening. I live in an area where pill addiction is the norm. Im surrounded. Its nice to see and talk to those who understand, rather than want to continue this life.

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    mottam is offline Advanced Member
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    babeston:
    How are you doing? Fine, I hope. You have gotten a few really good posts to your issue. Ruth has a tendency to nail things spot on. Maybe once you can get off of the pain meds, work an alternative pain regimen, and maybe take advantage of all that a 12-step fellowship has to offer, you will feel exponentially better.

    Some people may disagree with what I am about to post. But alcohol, for MOST of us addicts, is a drug. If you have had issues w/ it in the past, are battling depression, and now battling opiate addiction, please know there is hope, and absolutely light at the end of the tunnel.

    A few people I know have stopped opiates all-together, and enjoy a few cocktails once and awhile. That is fantastic for them. They simply have the strength not to let that get out of control. I, like you, have issues w/ opiates and alcohol. Not to mention I have a slight "imbalance". But that too is OK. As long as I do not pick up, go to the meetings I need to attend, keep in touch with my sponsor and network of people, do the next right thing, and do not take back my will, all will be well.

    I noticed you referenced "normal" a few times. Normal is a relative word. My "normal" may be your "nuts" .
    Give yourself a break, and take time to find out who you are. I have only read a few of your posts, but you seem like a nice person. Let that part of you grow. When you reach a state of acceptance, of what kind of person you are/want to be, you will find that peace, that "normal" that you desire.

    Kindest Regards
    mottam
    Persistency is consistency

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    ARTIST658 is offline Platinum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by babeston View Post
    Guys, thank you all for everything you wrote. I remember the first perc I took for this issue a few months ago [it wasnt the first one I ever took- I had them for childbirth and surgeries, but what started this whole thing] and I remember the thought I had wasnt the high feeling, it was that for once....NOTHING hurt. I felt human. Normal. I thought "this is how most people feel all the time!" *sigh* How freakin sad is that? As far as depression, I take a generic for celexa for it. It doesnt take much for the chemicals in my brain to be knocked off kilter and start depression. Im a recovering alcoholic and I always hated that feeling in the morning: being depressed. Thank you for listening. I live in an area where pill addiction is the norm. Im surrounded. Its nice to see and talk to those who understand, rather than want to continue this life.

    Dear babeston,

    I need to add a post-script to my post, after reading the rest of the story! I had no idea that you'd already had an issue with alcohol when I answered earlier. Once we are addicted to ONE addictive, mood altering substance, we can not use ANY mood-altering, addictive substance in safety. That means a recovering alcoholic is not safe taking a prescription narcotic -- and vice versa.

    All drugs of abuse operate on the same neural pathway in the brain. They trigger the same center of motivation/pleasure. Our brain does not differentiate between them, whether they be in liquid form, pill, powder or what-have-you. An alcoholic is an addict; their drug of choice is alcohol. So you already have that pathway in your brain that triggers addiction. Any other substance can easily tickle that same pathway and thereby trigger addiction.

    We are different from other 'earthlings' in that way. Once addicted, we can't undo it.

    While I agree with Mottam (and usually do!) - I take it a step further. No one who has already developed an addiction to an addictive drug is safe drinking alcohol. For some, they can control it for a short while. But, inevitably, it will either (a) progress into an addiction with the new substance, or (b) bring you back to your original drug of choice. There's just science behind it. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is the brain region involved in functions ranging from motivation and reward to feeding and drug addiction. That is the "neural pathway" I mentioned. We can't fool it, we can't control it. It is what it is.

    Also - Mottam is completely right about the spectrum of what is "normal" and about there being a light at the end of the tunnel - absolutely!!! I struggled with depression most of my life, first diagnosed with "dysthemia" (chronic depression) at 17 years old. Once I was completely clean of ANY and ALL addictive substances, only then did the doctors have a chance to see how an antidepressant (or combination of them) might work in my brain. If we are taking narcotics, benzos, pot or booze - or any substance that acts on the CNS - NO antidepressant or other psychiatric med has a chance of working properly.

    So, Babeston, we share a lot - a history of migraines, a history of depression, a history of alcoholism... and mine went on to a history of narcotic addiction. And I want you to know that recovery in all areas is possible. When I say I work a recovery program, it is a 3-legged-tripod, as I see it. It takes daily vigiliance to keep in recovery from migraines, depression and addiction; if one 'leg' of this tripod falters, the others are in danger of tumbling. It sounds difficult, but I can assure you it is possible - and it is so very worth it.

    Besides, for me it also required some 1-on-1 counseling and a lot of 12 step work ... but depression is NOT a part of my life today. Please know there is hope - and keep working to find the answers. If I can help, just speak up. There really is a peace of mind and sense of freedom that is beyond words or explanation.

    God bless,
    Ruth
    Sundwn likes this.

    You will know the truth - and only the truth can set you free.

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