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Believe it or not
  1. #1
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Default Believe it or not

    Debbie is a 40 year old white female who was seen in a physician's office in the month of December (during "flu" season) for presenting symptoms of a cough and fever. She insisted the physician give her something for this cough and suggested an antibiotic. The physician prescribed the antibiotic Amoxicillin and told her to return if she didn't get better. She returned to the physician's office the next day and presented with a rash that was diagnosed as a drug-induced rash related to the antibiotic. She was still coughing and had a slight fever. He switched the antibiotic to an oral Cephalosporin. After a few days, she called and said that she was not much better. The antibiotic was again changed. The physician prescribed Erythromycin.
    Approximately two weeks later, she presented to the hospital with signs and symptoms of enterocolitis and was diagnosed with Clostridium difficile pseudomembranous colitis. Clostridium difficile is often found in the intestine, but does not usually cause disease because other organisms in the bowel keep it in check. However, if one reduces the normal flora, it overgrows and causes a severe enterocolitis.

    This patient died from these complications. All she had in the beginning was a mild case of influenza!



  2. #2
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Mrs. Davis brought Stephen, her 2-year-old child, to our Friday evening pediatric walk-in clinic. We had a fairly busy evening and had been hurrying to get everyone properly seen before the 8 pm closing time. Mrs. Davis brought Stephen in because of fever and irritability. I am the clinic's pediatrician for the evening and have not previously seen this patient or his mother.
    The child has mild nasal discharge for two days and developed a fever of 100.6° F last evening.

    The mother, an intelligent woman who is employed as a laboratory technician, says she had a bad night last night with the child awake and crying. She held and walked him most of the night, but this helped only a little.

    He has been refusing his usual solid foods, but took adequate amounts of milk and juices and continues to have wet diapers. The child is sitting on her mother's lap, sucking vigorously on his pacifier and regards the examiner with a mixture of interest and suspicion.

    In the course of the examination, he produces a moderate amount of yellow-green nasal discharge. He has an occasional cough and cries when we examine him. His examination is normal; there is no sign of dyspnea and the lungs are clear to auscultation. The abdomen is normal. There is no rash. The child has a simple upper respiratory infection, assuredly viral in nature. His illness does not meet well-established criteria for sinusitis or possible invasive bacterial disease.

    Mrs. Davis appears tired and has dark circles under her eyes, not smiling during the entire visit.

    With gentle warmth, I let her know, I am glad to tell you this seems to be nothing more than a "bad cold" (I say bad to match what I think is her perception of it). Fortunately, there is no sign of ear infection, pneumonia, or other serious illness for her to worry about. He can have acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) if he is fussy with his fever, but otherwise the fever is helping him fight this infection. Saline nose drops or even a single drop of infant decongestant nose drops are good to clear his nose if he has trouble eating or breathing during the night, as long as you're careful not to use them more than once or twice.

    "I have nose drops and tried Tylenol last night and it didn't touch him," she says with fatigue and a touch of anger. She has never before worked with me and I find in her face no sign of trust or confidence in my judgment. "Can't you give him an antibiotic? I just can't have another night like last night!"

    I think there is now a note of fear in her voice, as well.

    Should I provide her with the antibiotic? If I don't, will she go to another physician who will? What would you do?



  3. #3
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    I would like just to say that
    please ,take care and dont forget that...Drugs are poisons which are cure man...please think deep before u deside to take drug without strong medical recommendation

  4. #4
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Medical experts gathered here today to remind Americans that drug abuse and addiction are often not about illegal substances but prescription medications from the neighborhood drugstore.


    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health estimates that 4 million people aged 12 or older -- 2% of that age group -- used prescription drugs for nonmedical purposes in 1999.


    With this kind of misuse and abuse, NIDA Director Alan Leshner, PhD, said today that the negative public health impact is "phenomenal" on the workplace, home, and family. "While prescription drugs can relieve a variety of medical problems and improve the lives of millions of Americans, they can be dangerous, addicting, and even deadly when used nonmedically," he said
    This is adroplet from ocean of drug misuse which may fload and cover even those who have some sorts of medical informations

  5. #5
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Studies show that women may be more likely to misuse narcotics and antianxiety medications, at least partly because they are far more likely to diagnosed with depression and given psychotherapeutic drugs while other Researches suggests that more than 17% of adults over age 60 may misuse or abuse prescription abuse. These Americans use drugs three times as frequently as the general population and have relative difficulty complying with the proper directions for medications. On the other hand,some
    data indicate that the biggest rise in nonmedical use of prescription drugs is among adolescents and young adults

  6. #6
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    To help keep prescription misuse and abuse in check, NIDA says that doctors need to make sure their patients understand how to properly take their prescriptions. Short-term pain drugs for use after surgery, for example, are not to be administered for months.


    Meanwhile, pharmacists should clearly tell consumers how to take their medications and explain side effects -- and check for false prescriptions. And patients should never take someone else's medications

    Pharmacy as aprofession should be the real meaning of ethics and the canddle which illuminate the darkness of ignorance

  7. #7
    dstaley is offline Member
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    quote:Originally posted by magid

    Should I provide her with the antibiotic? If I don't, will she go to another physician who will? What would you do? [/b]
    [b]I'm sorry, but I'm confused with your posts. Are you asking a forum of mostly un-trained non-professional readers to help you with your diagnosis and treatment, or are you letting us know about the National Institute of Health's percentage of possible abuse of medications in the United States and countries that we might be trying to help for what is mostly no charge??

    I really don't understand all of your posts but they eat at my heart, except that I know that Debbie is in a better place right now, and hope that others don't share her fate.

    The pain and helplessness echo's throughout your posts. I've never been in your shoes, but I'm sure that as a professional you did everything you could under the extreme circumstances and supplies that you were given.

    Anything we introduce into the human body can be considered a "poison". Even some foods that our bodies cannot digest properly. I believe that some poison's attack the proper elements of disease inside of us. Others, don't do as well and it's hard to know the difference. There should be recognized awards to those doctors that can know the difference and they would be in great demand when their not walking on water or some other foolish thing that separates them from us "common folk".

    Medicine; to a professional such as yourself, is not truly an exact science as you well know. You just do the best you can with the experience, education and resources you have available. Beyond that, we leave it to a Higher Power and believe we've done the right thing, and deep inside try not to blame others also trying to help the best they can no matter what percentages one can later quote.

    Your mileage may vary, as this is comming from someone who has no training in the science, but we can only do so much. No matter what country relies on medications heavier, or what countries burn herbs in hopes of healing. They share the same thing in common: they try to help those who are ill with every tool that they have available.

    And at the time, statistics are the last thing that come into play. The only thing that matters is people such as this Angel Debbie. These are the one's you do everything in your power and arsenal to protect and heal. If you don't want someone's help or their medications, then don't accept them. After all, I'm one of the people paying for those medications when I can't even get them for my own son her in the United States because I can't afford the price that we have to pay for medical treatment here. I for one am sorry for your pain, and the loss of such a beautiful Soul.

    Not being a medical professional I can't defend the use of any of the drugs for pain, infection, cough, fever or anything else. But I'm almost sure that none of the medical professionals involved woke up that morning with the thoughts of adding to any area's death toal. It hurts them as much as it obviously hurts you. Lives are to be saved. That's the way it should be, right??

    This time, the Blessings are for you ......
    dstaley

    -----------------------------
    There are obviously two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live.
    -- James Truslow Adams
    -----------------------------

  8. #8
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Dear dstaley

    deep thanks for your nice, mature and logic contribution
    which is concentrating upon the real benifit of the post

    Dear...

    sometimes we dont see the nature of the ground that we walk on
    it may be flat enough but sometimes small holes can let us fall upon our faces
    we as pharmacist, sometimes we forget to behave in right way concerning the general health attitute...therefore other people can do the same thing too due to their lack of knowledge

    Dear....

    Focusing on this important hot topic...may let me, you and other to think deep before taking the decission to misuse drugs and at least follow the instructions
    Thanks again dear for your observations...and why dont we see together this case?
    A MALAYSIAN executive in his mid-thirties developed a stomach upset and diarrhoea after a meal. He consulted his company doctor. He left the clinic with six little white packets - two types of antibiotics, two types of painkillers (Ponstan and Panadol), a small white pill for diarrhoea, and a pink tablet to be chewed three times a day. He was flabbergasted. 'I thought I only needed something to control the diarrhoea until I got home.'

    This case could be repeated in many clinics anywhere, reflecting the inappropriate and excessive use of antibiotics


  9. #9
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    In the area of antibiotics alone, the most prominent problem has been the over-utilization of drugs. The Center for Disease Control, for instance, estimates that 1/3 of the antibiotics taken on an outpatient basis in the United States are unnecessary. Increasing use of antibiotics is linked to the increase of their resistance by bacteria; in the United States, 14,000 people die each year from drug-resistant infections picked up in hospitals. 1

    In terms of healthcare costs, the rising use of pharmaceuticals has profound consequences. From 1993 to 1998, for instance, annual drug expenditures in the U.S. nearly doubled from $50.6 billion to $93.4 billion, most of the expenses being borne by third-party payors. 2 Total spending on prescription drugs doubled from 1995 to 2000 and tripled from 1990 to 2000, constituting one of the main factors driving up health care expenditures overall. 3

  10. #10
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Aquestion arrises here

    what is the role of each individual on his community?

    you may hold allitle part of information..but when people share their knowledge with each others, the network will be agreat deal of knowledge
    Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 and while it was available in the European theater during World War II, it did not become available on the open market until 1944. By 1945, we already had our first penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA) and that advanced to 25 percent resistance by 1949, and 50 percent by 1959. By this time, we were to market a new drug that was active against PRSA. So we did and it was called methicillin, released in 1960.

    Within a year or so, however, we had our first methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Reviewing the table "Our Culpable Climb to GRiEF and Catastrostaph," you can see that not much really happened during the first 20 years or so after methicillin appeared. In 1980, only 1-2 percent of all isolates were resistant. However, by the end of the decade, it had accelerated to 18 percent and another decade later, it had doubled again, from 17 to 35-40 percent resistant. In many large teaching hospitals today in 2002, we see about 50 percent methicillin resistance. One thing you might notice is that the increase in resistance was originally arithmetic--that is it increased by just a few percent--but this resistance became geometric--that is increasing by more than 10 fold--over the last 20 years


  11. #11
    magid is offline Junior Member
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    Dastely said
    I really don't understand all of your posts but they eat at my heart, except that I know that Debbie is in a better place right now, and hope that others don't share her fate.
    Me and of course you, hope that Debbie in better place now..her sprit fly on mercefull of the Lord...but we are here to discus topics that may save others

    Please dont look at the story as atrgedic story only, but as learning way to all of us

    Iam afraid brother Dastely , your reply is just based on racism

    Iam afraid and nothing but afraid and hope that Iam wrong

    Thanks again brother

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