Page 39 of 436 FirstFirst ... 2937383940414989139 ... LastLast
Results 1,141 to 1,170 of 13051
Like Tree21Likes
Lexapro Withdrawal
  1. #1141
    ltieri is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    .
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Hi guys. This is my first post. I was prescribed Lexapro about 2 months ago. I was given samples for about a month and a half. After the fourth day I started to feel results but then came online and read all the horrible stuff about the drug. My doctor told me there was no weight gain. That there were no withdrawal symptoms, that I can stop whenever I want without weaning, etc. So I stopped taking it after 4 days. Then I started to feel real ****py and decided to start taking it again. I didnt feel any results after about 5 days and started to read about Fish Oils, etc. So I stopped and started the fish oils for a week or two. I didnt feel anything from that (probably didnt give it enough time) and I was feeling really ****py, irritible, angry, easily agitated, so I decided since I had a month left of samples that I would go back on it for the holidays and see what happens. Well Lexapro works great for. I feel like myself except no anxiety. I am not irritible or angry. I have more patience for my kids. It is a miracle drug for me. But now I am concerned about weight gain and also all the other horrible things I have read. I would like to stop, wait a week, and then try some 5-HTP, as you do not gain weight on this and it is much cheaper, since I dont have insurance.

    Any advice? Do you think one week off of 10-mg Lexapro, after being on only for a month, would be enough time to wait until I try 5-HTP?

    I am going to start with tiny doses of the 5-HTP, maybe like 10 mg and then 15 and then work my way up to 25. Eventually increasing to 50 and then let it dictate at that point how far I will go with it, trying to keep it under 100 mg.

    Thanks guys!!!

  2. #1142
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Kimi d,

    My daughter is also experiencing the lack of sleep episodes.this can be very frustrating. As many are aware that Lexapro increases the levels of cortisol and thus causes adrenaline production. This could be a reason why many have trouble sleeping. What time of day are you taking the lexapro.

    You can request a 24 hour salival cortisol testing from your physician, You may also want to get all hormones tested. Usually they will be high with Lexapro use and after lexapro use.. You may be able to see the peaks and valleys in the cortisol levels but interesting to find that lexapro users usually get peaks at night when normal dips should occur..thus the anxiety and sleeplessness.

    Have any women also noticed a increase in their breast size, this is attributed to hormones that are unbalanced due to lexapro use.

    Check with your health food supplier on ginko biloba. Several SSRI users have stated that ginko biloba will naturally reduce cortisol levels...which will help to counteract lexapro's effect at increasing the cortisol.This herb has helped sleeplessness in many Lexapro users.. Take several hours before bed at the dose indicated on the label..

    Iteri,

    Please be cautious of taking 5 HTP close to stopping Lexapro because it can cause serotonin syndrome. Look out for symptoms of this condition. Some symptoms are:
    Chills, Mania, change in personality, teeth grinding, muscle jerking. Google Serotonin Syndrome to find more.

    I would highly suggest Dr. Anne Blake Tracy's Book or to check out her website at drugawareness.

  3. #1143
    juleswha is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thank you,Aunty, for all your great info! I had purchased the 5-HTP to help with my withdrawal symptons and obviously did not research this enough as I wasn't aware of the dangers of mixing Lexapro with 5-HTP. Not to be too dramatic but after reading about the dangers you just may have saved my life!

  4. #1144
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Steve Nolan, Pharm.D.
    Resident, University of Tennesesee College of Phamacy and William F. Bowld Hospital, Memphis

    J. Allen Scoggin, Pharm.D., MPA
    Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmcoeconomics, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memph

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Serotonin syndrome is described in the literature as a potentially serious drug-related condition characterized by a number of mental, autonomic and neuromuscular changes.1 Although serotonin syndrome can cause death, the condition is mild in most persons, and with supportive care alone they tend to recover completely. The syndrome, first described in animal models in the 1950s, was referred to as the "serotonin behavioral" or "hyperactivity syndrome."1 Reports of serotonin syndrome in humans followed, and have become increasingly frequent since the 1960s. The earliest reports involved persons who were taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Some of the early reports included patients who were also taking tryptophan, a serotonin precursor.1,2

    Serotonin syndrome is most often reported in patients taking two or more medications that increase CNS serotonin levels by different mechanisms. The most common drug combinations associated with serotonin syndrome involve the MAOIs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the tricyclic antidepressants.3 Because of the dramatic rise in the use of SSRIs, it is predicted that emergency room physicians are going to encounter the serotonin syndrome more frequently than in the past.1 Symptoms associated with the condition appear in TABLE 1.

    TABLE 1.

    Symptoms Associated with Serotonin Syndrome

    Mental status changes
    Confusion (51%)
    Agitation (34%)
    Hypomania (21%)
    Anxiety (15%)
    Coma (29%)

    Cardiovascular
    Sinus tachycardia (36%)
    Hypertension (35%)
    Hypotension (15%)

    Gastrointestinal
    Nausea (23%)
    Diarrhea (8%)
    Abdominal pain (4%)
    Salivation (2%)

    References 2, 4
    Motor Abnormalities
    Myoclonus (58%)
    Hyperreflexia (52%)
    Muscle rigidity (51%)
    Restlessness (48%)
    Tremor (43%)
    Ataxia/incoordination (40%)
    Shivering (26%)
    Nystagmus (15%)
    Seizures (12%)

    Other
    Diaphoresis (45%)
    Unreactive pupils (20%)
    Tachypnea (26%)
    Hyperpyrexia (45%)


    Several other medications can precipitate the serotonin syndrome (TABLE 2). Increased reporting of cases appears to be related to at least three things: recently published diagnostic criteria describing serotonin syndrome; greater use of antidepressant medications, such as the SSRIs; and an increased attempt by physicians to differentiate serotonin syndrome from neuroleptic malignant syndrome.4

    TABLE 2.

    Drugs that Affect Serotonin Levels

    Effect Drug
    Increase serotonin synthesis L-tryptophan
    Decrease serotonin
    metabolism isocarboxazid
    phenelzine
    selegiline
    tranylcypromine
    Increase serotonin release amphetamines
    cocaine
    reserpine

    Inhibit serotonin uptake amitriptyline
    clomipramine
    desipramine
    doxepin
    imipramine
    nortriptyline
    protriptyline
    fluvoxamine
    fluoxetine
    paroxetine
    nefazadone
    sertraline
    trazodone
    amphetamines
    cocaine
    dextromethorphan
    meperidine
    venlafaxine
    Direct serotonin
    receptor agonists buspirone
    lysergic acid
    diethylamide(LSD)
    sumatriptan

    Nonspecific increase in
    serotonin activity lithium
    Dopamine agonists amantadine
    bromocriptine
    bupropion
    levodopa
    pergolide
    pramipexole
    References 2, 4

    Mild to moderately severe cases of serotonin syndrome usually resolve in 24 to 72 hours.1 Though most cases can be treated and resolve within a week, some patients become acutely ill and require hospitalization. In some instances patients have been admitted to the ICU and required mechanical ventilation. Mortality associated with this condition is estimated to be 11%.4

    Serotonin Receptors

    Serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) occurs naturally in the body. In the periphery, serotonin acts both as a gastrointestinal regulating agent and a modulator of blood vessel tone.5 Although only 2% of the body’s serotonin is found in the brain as a neurotransmitter, the chemical can have a profound effect on body functions. As a neurotransmitter, serotonin is involved in the modulation of motor function, pain perception, appetite, and outflow from the sympathetic nervous system.4

    Serotonin acts at receptors generally classified into one of four categories, depending upon function and location. The four recognized serotonin receptors identified are 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4. Receptor subtypes also have been identified. For example, the 5-HT1d subtype lies outside the CNS and is the receptor through which sumatriptan exerts its antimigraine effect. Researchers agree that the majority of signs and symptoms associated with serotonin syndrome involve excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A receptor.1,6 Recent studies, however, show that the 5-HT2 receptor may be at least partially responsible for the serotonin syndrome.1,4 The 5-HT2 receptors are located in the brain and peripheral blood vessels.

    Most cerebral functions are the result of the convergence of many different neurotransmitters, including serotonin.7 This complex network of neurotransmitters makes it possible for serotonin to affect many functions and actions of the brain. For example, serotonin often serves as a cotransmitter along with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and norepinephrine. Serotonin antagonizes GABAB receptors, causing upregulation of this subtype. The activity of benzodiazepines in the treatment of serotonin syndrome is thought to occur because these compounds act as strong agonists at GABAB receptors. Certain dopaminergic neurons have serotonin receptors, resulting in serotonin-modulated release of dopamine in different areas of the brain.

    Serotonin Syndrome Risk Factors

    Risk factors for the development of serotonin syndrome are unclear, but some trends are becoming apparent as more cases appear in the literature. Some researchers have suggested that peripheral vascular disease and atherosclerosis may lead to severe vasospasm and hypertension in the presence of elevated serotonin levels. This seems paradoxical, since in peripheral areas of the body serotonin usually causes vasodilation. However, in patients with vascular disease serotonin can lead to profound vasoconstriction.6

    Another risk factor relates to drug metabolism rate. Slow metabolizers of SSRIs (approximately 7% of the population) may produce higher than normal levels of these antidepressants in the blood. A slow metabolizer receiving an SSRI in combination with another agent that raises serotonin levels is therefore at increased risk of developing serotonin syndrome.6

    Clinical Features and Differential Diagnosis

    Mental status changes are the most frequently reported symptoms associated with serotonin syndrome.2 Other commonly reported features include motor abnormalities, cardiovascular changes, gastrointestinal problems and miscellaneous changes such as diaphoresis and fever (TABLE 1).2,4 Martin refers to three categories of symptoms that are present: altered mental status, autonomic dysfunction and neuromuscular abnormalities.1 Sporer indicates that at least three of the following must be present for a diagnosis: mental status changes, agitation, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, fever (hyperpyrexia), shivering, diaphoresis, ataxia and diarrhea in the setting of a recent addition or increase in dose of an agent that raises serotonin levels. Sporer also points out that there should be no other obvious causes of the confusion and/or fever, and that no antipsychotic medications have been used or increased in dose prior to the onset of symptoms.3

    Poisonings and other diseases, such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), can cause symptoms that are very similar to serotonin syndrome (TABLE 3). Martin offers suggestions that may be useful in differentiating serotonin syndrome from these conditions. One is an observation that bromocriptine has been proposed as a treatment for NMS and a cause or precipitant of serotonin syndrome. Another is that NMS occurs from prolonged exposure to neuroleptic agents or withdrawal of dopamine agonists, and there is lead-pipe rigidity with NMS, in contrast to myoclonus or hyperreflexia seen in persons with serotonin syndrome.1

    TABLE 3.

    Differential Diagnosis of Serotonin Syndrome

    Diseases Poisonings
    Catatonia Anticholinergics
    Dystonia reaction (severe) Amphetamines
    Encephalitis Cocaine
    Hyperthyroidism 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid
    Malignant hyperthermia Dinitrophenol
    Meningitis
    Lithium
    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome LSD
    Septicemia MAOIs
    Stiff-man syndrome Pentachlorophenol
    Tetanus PCP (phencyclidine)
    Salicylates
    Strychnine
    Water hemlock
    Reference 1

    Medications Linked with Serotonin Syndrome

    Causative agents associated with serotonin syndrome include those that: increase serotonin synthesis (L-tryptophan); decrease serotonin metabolism (MAOIs); increase serotonin release; inhibit serotonin uptake (SSRIs); and stimulate certain serotonin receptors directly, and provide a nonspecific increase in serotonin activity (TABLE 2).

    The largest number of cases reported in the literature and the most serious consequences of serotonin syndrome have resulted from use of the MAOIs.3 Most cases were reported when an MAOI was used in conjunction with meperidine, tryptophan, dextromethorphan (an ingredient in many over-the-counter products), a tricyclic antidepressant, or an SSRI antidepressant.2,3 The long half-life (SSRIs) and duration of effect (irreversible MAOIs) seen with some of these medications increase the possibility of serotonin syndrome occurring several weeks after these drugs have been discontinued.1 It is important to note that serotonin syndrome has been precipitated by medications that are not usually thought of as being serotonergic. One author asserts that both meperidine and dextromethorphan are "notorious for precipitating acute serotonin syndrome."4

    Case Reports

    Select cases of suspected or confirmed serotonin syndrome illustrate the broad range of circumstances in which this condition can occur. Although there are many reports of "possible" serotonin syndrome reactions in the literature, in many instances the syndrome is not fully developed as there may be question as to whether the symptoms reported are really the result of serotonin syndrome. In such instances the diagnostic criteria developed by Sternbach, Martin and Sporer should be followed.1-3

    Case No. 1: A case reported in 1994 involved a 48-year-old man brought to the emergency room due to agitation and confusion. He had a three-year history of depression which was being treated with tranylcypromine (Parnate), an MAOI. The tranylcypromine was discontinued prior to E.R. presentation. Fourteen days after the MAOI was discontinued, fluoxetine (40 mg daily) was begun. Over the next 72 hours the patient developed agitation, diaphoresis and confusion. During his hospital stay he developed tachycardia and profound muscle rigidity and had to be intubated. In addition to supportive measures, the patient received diazepam and propranolol to relieve muscle rigidity, hypertension and tachycardia. By the third hospital day his temperature returned to normal and he rapidly recovered. He was released on the fifth day.8

    This case underlines the extreme importance of implementing a "wash out" period after the discontinuation of one serotonergic drug before the implementation of another. Even after two weeks, the effect of tranylcypromine was still active enough to cause a serotonergic crisis when therapy with fluoxetine was begun.

    Case No. 2: A 72-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for presumed Parkinson’s disease and depression. He was placed on selegiline and fluoxetine. After nine weeks of treatment, he presented with acute delirium which progressed to lethargy, malaise, myoclonic jerking and grand mal seizures. The fluoxetine was discontinued, but seven days later he experienced acute delirium, convulsions, and became unresponsive. The selegiline was discontinued. Five days later symptoms resolved completely.9 This case demonstrates the ability of fluoxetine to exert its serotonergic effects for a few days up to weeks after discontinuation. The effect probably is due to the long half-life of both fluoxetine and its active metabolite, norfluoxetine.

    Case No. 3: A recent report describes a 51-year-old man who developed serotonin syndrome when he combined Nyquil with paroxetine (Paxil). Pertinent medical history included depression, for which he was taking paroxetine, and peripheral vascular disease. Four days prior to admission, he developed nasal congestion which he self-medicated with Nyquil. Two days later, he experienced nausea, extreme shortness of breath, and confusion. Upon admission to the hospital he was experiencing tachycardia and his blood pressure was 202/110. During hospitalization the patient became rigid and more confused. Potential causes of symptoms, including strychnine poisoning, anxiolytic withdrawal and tetanus were ruled out (TABLE 3). Administration of lorazepam resolved all symptoms, and he was transferred to the ICU with normal mental status. The paroxetine was discontinued, and after a four-week follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic.5

    The most probable explanation for the development of serotonin syndrome in this patient was the combination of dextromethorphan (an ingredient in Nyquil) and paroxetine. The pseudoephedrine in Nyquil (10 mg/5 mL) may have produced the adrenergic effect (e.g., increased blood pressure). In addition, the vascular disease may have been a predisposing factor. Dextromethorphan inhibits reuptake of serotonin (TABLE 2) and has previously been implicated in serotonin syndrome when combined with an MAOI.4,5 It has been shown that persons with a history of vascular endothelial damage are at risk of vasospasm in the presence of increased serotonin levels.1 The authors of this case report suggest that patients with pre-existing vascular disease may be at increased risk of developing complications related to increased serotonin levels. As a result, caution should be exercised when administering serotonergic medications to patients with vascular disease. If possible, such patients should consult a physician or pharmacist before self-medicating with over-the-counter cough medicines.

    Case No. 4: The newer antidepressants may pose a potential problem as well. For example, nefazodone (Serzone), blocks 5-HT2 receptors and also inhibits reuptake of serotonin. Recently there was a report of a 51-year-old woman with a history of bipolar disorder who was brought to the emergency room unresponsive, diaphoretic, hyponatremic and with muscle rigidity. The patient had taken nefazodone (Serzone) for six months and had just discontinued the drug for two days. One day before admission she was started on paroxetine (Paxil). She improved dramatically after supportive treatment and dantrolene.10 Although nefazodone is a relatively weak 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, it is still capable of causing serotonin syndrome when combined with a stronger 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. While the researchers who reported this case believe it to be the first case of serotonin syndrome reported from the use of nefazodone and paroxetine, they point to other reports involving the use of trazodone and paroxetine.

    TABLE 4.

    Pharmacist Management of Serotonin Syndrome

    Patient/Prescriber Education

    Make certain patients understand potential problems, what they should look for, and what to do if symptoms occur (e.g., muscle spasms, shaking, shivering, sweating, confusion)

    Contact prescribers when the risk for serotonin syndrome increases (e.g., concurrent therapy with two or more serotonergic agents). Counsel patients to determine if OTC products containing serotonergic ingredients are being used.

    Prevention

    Reconsider using two or more serotonergic medications

    Consider switching to less serotonergic alternatives

    Management

    Discontinue all serotonergic medications

    Consider benzodiazepines for myoclonus and resultant hyperthermia

    Consider cyproheptadine, propranolol, or methysergide if symptoms persist

    Provide immediate supportive care as necessary (e.g., therapy for hypertension, tachycardia, hyperthermia, respiratory distress)


    Management and Prevention

    No specific therapeutic approach to the treatment of serotonin syndrome has been fully evaluated in the literature. The most common treatment involves the use of the benzodiazepines. In severe cases, the antiserotonergic agents cyproheptadine, methysergide, and propranolol have been used.3,6,11 In all cases the suspected agent should be discontinued. Over-the-counter drugs containing ingredients known to increase serotonin levels or exacerbate the patient’s condition, such as dextromethorphan, pseudoephedrine or phenylpropanolamine, also should be discontinued.

    Initial treatment should consist of supportive measures aimed at reducing hypertension, tachycardia, hyperthermia and respiratory distress if these conditions are present. Lorazepam and diazepam have been shown to be effective in treating myoclonus associated with serotonin syndrome, and in mild cases, are usually the only treatment necessary. It is important to note that clonazepam has been found to be ineffective in treating serotonin syndrome. Unlike diazepam and lorazepam, clonazepam is not a potent agonist of the GABAB receptor.6 The more severe cases that do not respond to benzodiazepines may respond to dantrolene, which may be effective in relieving muscle rigidity and hyperthermia.1

    Pharmacists should recognize potential problems associated with the concurrent use of certain medications, such as the MAOIs and the SSRIs and other agents that can cause serotonin syndrome. Due to the potentially serious nature of this condition, it seems prudent that pharmacists always monitor patients who are taking combinations of serotonergic drugs and be alert to the possibility of "serotonergic duplication" and notify physicians and other prescribers when the risk of drug adversity appears eminent. The use of therapeutic alternatives in certain instances could be life-saving.


  5. #1145
    tamra is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    72

    Default

    WOW IS THERE ALOT OF INFO HERE! I've got 72 pages of reading to catch up on! So far, most of my life's mysteries on Lexapro are being solved just by reading all of your posts! About 2 years on it. In the beginning they were my happy pills. This past holiday season, I knew that I needed to make some changes in my life. I started on Lexapro after exhausting efforts on other meds. I've had depressive times, anxiety related episodes, post partum blues, etc...now I'm carrying 45 pounds of extra weight around and I'm wondering what could have been so bad in my life that I started taking these pills!?!

    Does anyone have a listing of "helps" and natural supplements? I'm going to start a multivitamin and omega's. This is the 1st day of feeling foggy, dizzy, not quite right. It's my 3rd day on 10 mg. I've tapered down from 20, then 15 for a week, now 10.

    I hadn't realized the number of health issues that I've been having are related to the Lexapro. The Cushing Syndrome info was extrememly helpful...I want to read more about this. I was almost going in for surgery (gynocologist) because of episodes of extreme pain 2 months ago.

    So, how about the GOOD NEWS?? Who is loosing weight and how long does it take? Is there info on jump starting your metabolism? Maybe this goes along with the multi vitamin question.

    Thanks for any responses! Thank goodness I found you all when I did! Have a great day! Tamra


    Live every day to it's fullest!

  6. #1146
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Tamara,

    Welcome, Supplements many have started with may be Omega 3 Fish Oil preferably Carson's.This will help with depression and weight loss.

    Magnesium Citrate or Magnesium malate will help with anxiety and leg or muscle cramping. Take prior to dinner, preferably in the AM.

    Primal Defense by Garden Of Life if you are experiencing stomach

    cramping and gas and bloating. It's expensive but worth it, Start slow and work up to recommended amount.

    Calcium taken within 2 hours of the magnesium, not together.

    A Good multivitamin with minerals. Garden of Life has good selections, not one a day or cheaper brands.

    Bonnie or Draminine for dizziness works for many.

    Benydryl at bedtime helps with occasional sleeplessness.

    If you are having depersonalization issues, Noani Juice 4 ounces mixed with 12 ounces of water will help these feelings. Sip this thru out the day.

    Walnuts or almonds are good for blood sugar issues which for many are the cause of the dizziness.Also if you take a handful of walnuts or almonds before bed they help some to wake up less often during the night due to low blood sugar levels.
    If you are experiencing the anxiety attacks you may want to try Bach's Flower Essences in White Chestnut for anxiety. Google Bach's Flower Essences to find out more. They are available at Health Food Stores such as Vitamin Shoppe.

    Vitamin C as able to tolerate. Or get it by drinking orange juice or oranges.


    That should get newcomers started but everyone is different so start slowly with supplements. Stay away from caffeine and sugar and carbs. Vegetables and quality protein are great.

  7. #1147
    enaek is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Thanks for the info on cushing syndrome...

    It's just so frustrating that I have no control over my body. I've posted on other sights and done a lot of research on weight gain from antidepressants, and there is hardly any advice on how to lose it. The best results I heard was how one woman lost 1/2 her weight gained by doing a year of weight watchers. I don't want to wait a year to get my figure back.

    Sorry to harp on this...for me it's be the most difficult side effect to deal with. I guess I am vain...

  8. #1148
    Ron714 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    30

    Default

    My wife has been on lexapro 10 mgs for about 4 months now , she has gained atleast 40lbs , I Never would tell her that I can see it , she was always on the heavy side but now its really bad, I have been telling her about this post and the problems people are having getting off it , but she doesn't listen , maybe becuse the drug thing is always about me , will explain another time. good luck everybody.
    RON
    quote:Originally posted by kimi_d

    Hello all,

    I'm now about day 8 on my Lexapro taper. Still on the 10mg/day.

    Auntybiotic, could you elaborate on the bloat? Is it a fluid bloat? In any of the tissues? ... My scale tells me I am gaining weight, yet my appetite and eating has decreased. This is depressing in itself.

    I'm also having some mild stabing pains in my leg. They seem to come like waves and then subside. Sleeplessness is still an issue. But none of these things have gotten bad enough to make me go back to the 20mg dose. I know from past posts I am only at the beginning of perhaps a long road, but knowing what may come has helped so much. Thanks to everyone on this board.

    Debbie, I'm a newbie here , but I can certainly relate to the weight issues. There is so much good information here (at times overwhelming for me)... but the one thing I learned for myself...know what may come, it makes it easier...if you really need/want off the Lexapro.


  9. #1149
    tamra is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Thanks for the info on vitamins and supplements! On the weightloss issue...I'm right there with you! If anyone would like to chat about Weight Watchers...just let me know. I don't want to bore those who are trying to gain weight with diet talk! lol My mom just started and loves it because it's so easy...she's convinced to try it too.

    To Ron: It's so wonderful that you are supporting your wife and getting involved with what's happening to her. Maybe the best way to help would be to get healthy and exercise with your wife. Try to go for a walk or try something different..like a salad for dinner - because it's healthy..(don't say "to loose weight") maybe she'll open up to you and admit that it's been bothering her too. If she's at all like me...the weight is just uncontrollably happening and you can stop it. I haven't had cravings like that since I was pregnant! My husband has been wonderfully supportive and encouraging...but all along he has been thinking that my weight gain has been because of my interest in the "Bakery Group"...and so have I! It's nice to know that there are others with Carb based cravings. Since I decreased my dosage, I've noticed that I don't really have an interest in the cookie bag anymore. Actually, my stomach is too gurgly to think about it. It's been great to vent here! I try my best to use humor in my life and make the most of it. If I really dwelled on this...I could convince myself in 10 minutes that I had more side effects than I'm really having and would be in tears. I haven't read enough of the posts here to know if humor is the beginning of the crash...I sure hope not! Have a great evening! Tamra


    Live every day to it's fullest!

  10. #1150
    juleswha is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Hi Aunti,
    looking for yet more info from you. I did some reading via the net and it seems there are several herbs that lower cortisol in the body. Holy Basil is supposed to be excellent and I found a lot of positive data on this herb. I know you have consulted a chart in the past to check on interactions, would you let me know if you see anything regarding taking Holy Basil. I am down to 2.5 MGs a day taking B vitamins, Omega 3's magnesium and a multi. some nauseu and pretty cranky but okay so far with only a few brains zaps. The omegas must be helping with that.

    thanks for any info you can provide me, I really appreciate it!

  11. #1151
    lexex is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I want to thank you all for sharing all of your stories! It has been so helpful. I thought I was crazy until I came across this site several months ago. I stopped taking Lexapro on Aug. 1, and I’ve been on a roller coaster ever since. I was on 10 mg for two years. I was taking it for depression. Once I felt I was ready to stop, I went to my doctor and he told me to take 5 mg for three months and then stop. I didn’t know anything about the kind of withdrawal symptoms that are associated with Lex., so I only took the 5 mg for about six weeks then I stopped.

    I have experienced so many symptoms. They seem to come in waves. First it was the flu-like symptoms and then the “brain zaps.” Then I had this really bad sinus infection. Then I had migraines. They went on for what felt like forever. The only thing that helped me were almonds. I have no idea why. Now for the past few weeks I have been experiencing really bad anxiety. I don’t remember having this kind of anxiety before I started the Lexapro. I have this irrational fear of riding the elevator at work now. Also I think I gained about 20 pounds while I was on Lex. Even after being off the drug for 5 months and working out 3 to 4 days a week, I still haven’t lost a pound. My doctors have not been very helpful through this process. I’m trying to work through it on my own. I have shied away from supplements. I did try the omega 3’s but I would get this fishy taste in my mouth.

    If you guys have any suggestions on how to cope with anxiety I would really appreciate it. I was reading about SAMe on the web today. Does anybody have any info. on it? Thanks!

  12. #1152
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    I was hesitant to make this post yet as I know I'm far from over this, but the past 4 days I have felt very well. I have never had more than 2 days in a row before where I felt good at all. Now likely tomorrow I will have issues again, but who knows. I still have 2 or 3 times when I feel a bit dizzy per day, and stomach issues once or twice, but not nearly as much as even last week. I have done nothing different yet, as I am still awaiting my shipment. If I feel this good for a week more, I'll have some good news to share with you all. Keeping my fingers crossed.

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  13. #1153
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    I was hesitant to make this post yet as I know I'm far from over this, but the past 4 days I have felt very well. I have never had more than 2 days in a row before where I felt good at all. Now likely tomorrow I will have issues again, but who knows. I still have 2 or 3 times when I feel a bit dizzy per day, and stomach issues once or twice, but not nearly as much as even last week. I have done nothing different yet, as I am still awaiting my shipment. If I feel this good for a week more, I'll have some good news to share with you all. Keeping my fingers crossed.

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  14. #1154
    enaek is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Still feeling good Red?

    To all of us with Lex weight issues...I'm trying a metabolism booster (Xenadrine) to see if that will get my metabolism going. It's been 3 days...I'll let you know if it does anything...

  15. #1155
    debbie724 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Well, I'm on my 2nd week of tappering off the lexapro. Went from 20mg. to 10mg. and now I'm on 5mg. I've lost 3 pounds and haven't changed any of my eating habits. Yeah! I've got a LOT more to go. I haven't experienced anything bad from tappering the lexapro. I also take Depakote, Wellbutrin, and Ativan. Maybe that's why. I have a LOT more energy, and I feel more "up" than I have in years. I really think getting off this medication will be a good thing. The only reason my doctor added that to my other meds was because I was going through a divorce and needed an extra boost. It took us 5 1/2 years, 6 moves, and the ex moving back in with his girlfriend (for the last time) for me to finally file for the divorce. We were married for a very long time... so we gave it our all. I think we both felt guilty for wanting to go on without each other. I now look forward to getting on the scale every day. I've got 37 more pounds to go.

    debbie menocal

  16. #1156
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Day 5 of no real problems. The only time I felt funny was while driving today. Has anyone else noticed an increase in the heat haziness when driving?

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  17. #1157
    Shifty is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Take a closer look at those fat burners. I saw an expose about them having excessive amounts of caffeine in them. Here is one link:

    http://www.oprah.com/health/omag/hea...etsupp_b.jhtml

    Try running maybe?

    ---
    I have taken : Paxil, Lexapro, Xanax, and Lithium
    Currently: 450mg Eskalith CR (Lithium)

    I was mis-diagnosed for 3 years. They thought I had Generalized Anxiety Disorder with a Major Depressive Episode. The real problem was Bipolar Disorder.
    Quit Lexapro cold-turkey Dec 22, 2005.
    Ask me anything, nothing is off-limits.

  18. #1158
    enaek is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I run between 2 and 4 miles a day, 4 times a week. My weight isn't budging!

  19. #1159
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Sure seems quiet in here lately, everyone must be feeling better

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  20. #1160
    tamra is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Last nite I went from 10mg to 5mg. Last week would have been much worse if I didn't have this forum as a reference to what was going on...thanks to everyone again! I'm starting to feel like my clouds are lifting. There were so many times on Lexapro that I wondered "who I was" the day before...strange.

    Has anyone had muscle pain? Not stabbing, but like overworked very sore muscles? I fell on the ice last week and expected to have a couple days of stiffness and soreness, but this seems a little different. The pain is most noticeable at night (when I'm trying to sleep) and in the morning. I'm hoping that rest and multivitamin will aid in healing.

    I've also noticed that I have absolutely NO interest in my beloved bakery group! The things that I craved and thought that I needed to survive are not the least appetizing.

    I think I'm going to make an appt with my doctor when this is all over..and go over all of the interesting details with him. I don't think he's aware of "this" side of Lexapro.

    Thanks everyone & have a great sunny day![8D]

    Live every day to it's fullest!

  21. #1161
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Hi Everyone,

    I have been busy with major projects so I have not been able to check in very much. It does seem quiet here, I hope that is a good sign.

    Ms. Lee,
    How are you doing?? Have the withdrawals been getting easier?



    I have researched Holy Basil and can not find any contraindication to taking it with Lexapro. As with anything new, if you are going to take it to block cortisol absorption, go cautiously.

    Debbie,
    Congratulation on making the choice to divorce and go on with your life, sometimes making the decision can be the hardest part.Many have stayed in relationships that are unrewarding and even unhealthy emotionally because it is easier then making the changes necessary to leave.

    Always remember that when a door closes, windows open to other opportinities. It can be overwhelming at first and it is funny how we can feel guilty for leaving someone that cheated on us and made us feel less then loved.

    You say you are two weeks into the taper from 20 MG/ How long did you take 20 MG? How long have you been on the Wellbutrin and the Adivan and at what dosage?

    How have you tapered from 20 to 10 to 5 MG.............over what period? For example a week at 10 then tapered to 5? Let me know the details as this can be very important three months from now with understanding side effects you may get down the line.

    It can take about 7 days to 14 days for the body to feel the effcts of a taper. Ypu may not have given your body a chance to adjust to the first tapers yet. Or you may be one of the few lucky ones that will get by with minimum discomfort.

    Generally after a 5 to 10% taper you wait three weeks, if you have not fely any withdrawals it would be safe to say that you can go ahead and taper 5 to 10% again and wait three weeks.

    If you do get withdrawals such as dizziness, naseau, nightmares, crying or anxiety.....................then wait intil you stabilize.

    Debbie,

    The wellbutrin is also acting on your neurotransmitters so you may not feel the full effects of stopping the Lexapro. Do you also plan to stop the Wellbutrin amd Ativan ?

    When you are stopping all chemical alterations of the brain chemistry, then the withdrawal effects may really hit as your body tries to readjust the trying to normalize.The ativan will be covering up the anxiety and sleeplessness caused by Lexapro withdrawals,

    Mr. Spock,

    How are you doing with our withdrawals. Miss you informative and uplifting posts.

    For those raeding, take a minute to let us know how you are all doing, good or bad................... as it helps others going thru this to have a idea of what can be expected.

    Hoping to hear from prevoius posters.How are all of you???


  22. #1162
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Last night and so far today I am feeling like junk for some reason. Not sure if its something I ate, but my bowell area is just really ticked off. I suppose a full 7 days of feeling better was to much to ask for Oh well, heres to hanging in there.

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  23. #1163
    elliee50 is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Hello Everyone,

    I was currently on 5mg of lexapro for about 6 months. 2 months ago I started cutting the pills in half so i was taking 2.5mg once a day. I stayed on 2.5 for 2 months, 5 days ago I stopped taking lexapro all together. I now feel sick to my stomach and a bit weird, I keep getting hot flashes and feel terribly tired. Did i wean myself off the drug correctly? How much longer will these side effects last?

    Thanks!
    Elliee

  24. #1164
    Redbled is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Hi Elliee,

    No one can really answer the question of how long it will last for you. At least you did some level of tapering, several of us here did not. I'm heading towards 5 months of withdrawal, though I'm not nearly as bad as the beginning. All the symptoms you describe are normal. If you start to get zaps in your brain, don't panic, that is normal as well.

    Only took Lexapro for 10 days, as a doctors response to my brief anxiety over a treatable medical condition. Took my last pill at the very end of August.

  25. #1165
    Mr Spock is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Australia.
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Hi everyone,
    I also had a few days off, as basically I really haven't had anything to report, or been inspired.
    First of all I would like to thank both Kimi D and Auntybiotic for your warm complementary comments. I certainly have felt a fond cameraderie with other members of this forum, as we are all either directly or vicariously dealing with a very difficult, frustrating and at times, heartbreaking battle. But we will all win in the end!!! And I know that we will certainly be the stronger and the wiser for it, if not already!!!
    Anyway, as I briefly memtioned in my last post, I had started taking all these things. These were Mega B's, Omega 3, Vitamin C (1000mg), the Brahmi complex, and Lethicin for the Choline (makes Cholecystine, another neuro-transmitter). Anyway, I read in Antidepressantfacts somewhere, that Cholecystine only acts when there is a lack of serotonin, so I am wondering if it may be more harm than good, so I stopped taking it. Has anyone any thoughts on this issue??
    Also, I went and saw another naturopath. Unfortunately, she did not have any knowledge or experience with an SSRI withdrawal, so basically suggested a 2 day fast, where one eats just carrots or celery and drinks lots of water.
    So, yesterday I tried it. Couldn't hack two days of carrots, so has 3 sticks of celery for breakfast, and from there on the day went completely downhill!!! I was so drowsy, I started to get a bad headache early afternoon, despite more celery, and had probably the worst day since I started withdrawing 16 weeks ago. Further in the afternoon I partially capitulated by having an apple, and more celery. By this time I couldn't stomach the stuff raw, so I doused it with salad dressing with a minor improvement. Things didn't get better, so I eventually had some muffins and a cup of tea about 7PM. However, by then the damage had been done, and the headache got worse, and the extreme tiredness prevailed. So, the day ended with 1000mg of Paracetamol and an early night. Today, I'm back on normal food and feel a lot better than yesterday although still have the usual side-effects.
    I mention as a prelude to a discussion. First of all, I only normally drink two cups of instant coffee a day and one cup of tea, so I really don't think that this would account for it.
    However, I really now have a suspicion that if someone has been on an SSRI for a while, not only do the neuro-receptors down-regulate but the body itself reduces the amount of serotonin it produces... Is this possible, or even correct?
    And, as we have found out, sources of serotonin are from carbohydrates, of which I had nil for most of yesterday. Of course, I also could have been hypoglycaemic as well... Excuse the pun but it certainly is "food for thought".
    Anyway, I have now come to the conclusion that we need to keep up a level of carbohydrates whilst withdrawing, although giving up sugar (which I have just done) is a good idea, paricularly as it is short acting and ends up causing a low blood sugar once it wears off anyway.
    If you want to get the weight off, you have to wait for the cortisol level to drop and do some light to moderate exercise daily, and it will come. Speaking of which, after two days off, I'll be back on the bike tonight, as it really has become a high point of the day, not just for the endorphins, but also knowing that it is a very positive activity, and a good way to get rid of my paunch, something that I have never previously had.
    Redbled, I know you must be disheartened, but I believe that you are really close to a full recovery. Obviously, you're still are going to have hiccups, but these will occur less and less, and then finally disappear. Both Miss Lee and I are right behind you in this regard, and this will all be a distant memory for us all soon.
    I know that for others who are browsing this site, whoever you are, don't go cold turkey!!!
    Lexex, stay away from the SAMe, it increases Serotonin, and paradoxically, may make your anxiety worse. The anxiety could still be due to withdrawals as after the physical symptoms abate, depression and/or anxiety can appear. Some medical practitioners may suggest that this is a return of your original symptoms, but this is not necessarily true, although it could be...

    Peace and Long Life

  26. #1166
    sarche is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Malaysia.
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I am seeking advice on when is the best time to take lexapro so that I can sleep well. I am currently taking 15 mg at 7 pm. I don't seem to sleep well. I am also currently tapering off clonazepem using valium. Later I will taper-off lexapro.

    If taking in the morning at 7 am will help sleep beter, how do you switch to the morning?

    Thanks for any advice.

    Sar

  27. #1167
    Kendra is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I've been taking Omega 3 Fish Oil for a few weeks. The excessive hunger has not returned (nor has the depression), but I haven't "magically" lost weight. But I haven't exactly made the best food choices or gone back to exercising yet. The real test will be when I change my diet and exercise.

    [u]Anyone see this? Prevention Magazine (Feb 2006 issue, pg 118):</u>

    Research last year found that chromium helps prevent weight gain. Now, an 8-week study shows it curbed appetite and cravings by 50% in people with depression who took a daily 600mcg chromium picolinate supplement.
    Thoughts?
    _________________

    ~ I was on Lexapro for two months -- up to 20mg. Slowly tapered to 15, 10, 5. Last dose was Dec. 14. ~

  28. #1168
    RedPA is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    17

    Default

    quote:Originally posted by Kendra


    people with depression who took a daily 600mcg chromium picolinate supplement.[/i]
    Thoughts?
    _________________
    I took Chromium picolinate about 4 yrs ago - I started to feel the shakes, as if I had had a few cups of coffee, and my heart felt like it was beating a bit fast, so I quit it. I was close to my normal weight at the time, so I didn't feel like pushing it with the supplement. It was more important I perform well at work at the time than lose a few lbs.

    Of course, I am many lbs. overweight since then, but am concerned about taking supplements.

    Update on my lex weaning: I am now taking 5 mg every other day. I'm on my own (no doctor's advice at this time - no insurance) for weaning off. But, it has been a few months coming down from 20mgs, I'm hoping my body will tolerate this fine. Glad to be able to come here over the past few months and talk.

  29. #1169
    sarche is offline New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Malaysia.
    Posts
    4

    Default

    quote:Originally posted by Kendra

    I've been taking Omega 3 Fish Oil for a few weeks. The excessive hunger has not returned (nor has the depression), but I haven't "magically" lost weight. But I haven't exactly made the best food choices or gone back to exercising yet. The real test will be when I change my diet and exercise.

    [u]Anyone see this? Prevention Magazine (Feb 2006 issue, pg 118):</u>

    Research last year found that chromium helps prevent weight gain. Now, an 8-week study shows it curbed appetite and cravings by 50% in people with depression who took a daily 600mcg chromium picolinate supplement.
    Thoughts?
    _________________

    ~ I was on Lexapro for two months -- up to 20mg. Slowly tapered to 15, 10, 5. Last dose was Dec. 14. ~
    Kendra,

    Please share how you taper off the lexapro. How many days between each reduction? Did you do it yourslef or under a doctor's supervision? Did you exercise and take supplements to help? What was the lexapro originally prescibed for?

    Please share your experience as I want to get off 15 mg of lexapro.

    Appreciate you share your experience. Thanks

    Sar

  30. #1170
    Torxis is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    USA.
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Sarche, to switch your med schedule from nights to mornings take each dose 1-2 hours earlier each day until you get to the desired time. IE if you take it normally at 7pm take tonights dose at 5:30, tommorrow's at 4:30, next day at 3 etc. Until you get to where you want to be! Good luck
    To everyone out there- exercise, exercise,exercise- It really does help with all sorts of mental issues. Anxiety, depression, phobias, etc... What doesn't kill you makes you stronger! Don't start by running a marathon, take it easy, one day at a time. We don't have to scale mountains, just climb out of the hole we find yourselves in!
    Good Luck-Be Well &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;TORXIS

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22