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Lexapro Withdrawal
  1. #3931
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    Shew,spatzkey glad you checked in. I was thinking of you only last night. I am sure not everyone snaps on this medication but I have been a bit concerned ever since that gun went missing. Glad you are ok and sorry to hear about your wreck. Rib injuries can be so painful.
    I wouldn't ask him, but wonder why he went back on the Lexapro I do wish he had tried a slow taper and maybe he wouldn't have felt the need but this is definitely not an issue someone can be forced into. If, years ago, someone had told me I would regret being on Paxil and then Lexapro I would have argued them up one side and down the other. I did get where I didn't care about anything at all. The tough thing is that it is hard to know if this is the effect of the Lexapro or his personality without him getting off the Lexapro long enough for him to revert back. Who knows, maybe you are giving him more credit than he deserves and this IS a part of his personality. But my money is still on the Lexapro, and if it is he WILL come to the point where he realizes it. At least know that you have done all that could be done to convince him that it is worth trying to get off of it. I know it must be terrible moving and going it alone at this point but at least you will be safe and there won't be the additional stress that you would be subjected to if you stay in this situation. And, as I mentioned before, maybe your leaving will give him some time to think and reconsider his position. I wanted to give you my email address because I really would love to keep in touch with you and make sure you are doing ok. I promise I am not a nut. Well, maybe a little bit of a nut but nothing harmful anyhow, please feel free to email ANYTIME My email is hairyarmadillo@msn.com I am serious about keeping in touch-you can never have too much support or too many friends!

  2. #3932
    spatzkey is offline New Member
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    Thank you so much Hairyarmadillo. I will def. keep in touch!!! These last 4 months have been really trying for me. I guess my I have been trying to convince myself that this is the meds and not the person I have known all these years who is capable of such ugly behavior. I have to say, I am concerned about him when I leave. I worry that he will snap out of what ever he is in (drugs or not) and do something crazy. He has OCD, and I know he used to beat himself up in the past when he didn't do something "right". I fortunately was able to get the guns!! I actually took them to the Police station and "turned them in". You know they say "God wispers", and boy did I ever get a gut feeling about them things 2 or 3 wks ago. Good thing! He actually told me he hid them from me!
    I am wondering what you think of me sending an email to his boss before I leave CA. Its not a tattle thing because I am not like that, but a concern letter since he has no family here. I don't know if this would be a good thing or not. The last thing that I want to do is come off as a nutty person, or make him seem like one. I just wanted to say how he has been stressed and has had alot of anxiety and his OCD got worse and now since he has been on Lexapro I have seen first hand how his behavior has changed severly and I am just concerned once I leave it will get worse. I feel like if I don't say something and leave, and something bad happens that I would never forgive myself. ahhhhhhh......Anyhow,let me know what you guys think. Thanks everyone!

  3. #3933
    azureblue is offline Junior Member
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    Default Hey Guys!

    I haven't been on here for a bit. My tapering has been going EXTREMELY well (knock on wood!)! The only problem I do have is EXTREME sleepiness! I fell asleep at a stop sign the other day... scary, I know. I am always SUPER tired! I only feel good when I get 12 to 15 hours of sleep/ night. Then, I still want to come home from work and fall asleep. Could this be caused by my Lexapro. I have been on it for three+ years, and I have been EXTREMELY tired for at least a year and a half... probably longer. My husband says I have always been this way (we have been together for three years as well). But my mom says I was NEVER this way! I have even been to the doctor twice for it in the last year and a half. They have given me glucose tests to check for diabetes and my thyroid, but I turn out just fine. They want to send me to a sleep doctor, but I am afraid it will just be a waste of time and money. Do you think it is just the lex, or do I need to go to the doctor? If it is the lex., when will it go away? I am curently on 9mg.

    Also, I have this crazy rash that comes and goes all the time. It itches SUPER bad, and looks like heat rash. However, I get it even in the winter, and I HATE cold weather... I freeze in the winter (I am not a hot-blooded person). Could this rash somehow be explained by Lex., or am I just going overboard now? Just curious.

    PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!!!!

  4. #3934
    azureblue is offline Junior Member
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    Oh, I forgot to mention, I was on 20mg for three years.

    I also have a substansial amount of weight gain. I used to weigh 115-120. Now I weigh 142. Will this weight come off once I am off the drug? Will it be easier to loose then, or am I going to have to starve myself and workout like a maniac to loose it?

  5. #3935
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    Hi azureblue,
    am so glad that your tapering is going so well!! That is wonderful! -- I'm sorry that you've been soo sleepy - but just thought to give a couple ideas -- first, since antidepressants 'work' by slowly excavating your adrenal glands, you may be experiencing adrenal exhaustion, thus an extreme sleepiness all the time, night time etc.. I think you might be able to get it checked out, but do some research on that to see if you have other symptoms of that.. I went through an extreme sleepiness phase withdrawing, but that slowly got better and aunty said it is adrenal exhaustion.. could very easily make you cold sensitive too..
    Also, just because I have been recovering from chronic fatigue syndrome, it is something to be aware of - antidepressants can be a cause of it too... It's characterized mostly by extreme fatigue, need to sleep a lot but don't sleep that deeply, swollen lymph/other glands, low blood pressure, stiff muscles/pain in some, decreased memory/concentration, sensitive to heat and cold, etc.. and one of the main things that part of the treatment was to get your sleep schedule so that you are only in bed 8-9 hours a night... (our bodies are designed to only be lying down that many hours a day, -- more is actually quite detrimental, unless you have a different serious condition) really hard, but vital.. Anyways, if you've got adrenal exhaustion, you probably need that sleep time, but if you've got CFS, or like that, a person has to work on 'sleep hygiene'...
    Anyhow, I don't know, but these are some possibilities -- also , if you do have adrenal exhaustion, don't take supplements or B vitamins to stimulate your adrenals, that makes it worse in the long run as the glands need to rest and recover (probably will be until the drug is out of your system though .. I don't know, just some ideas!!!
    hope you feel better soon, and are almost done tapering???
    take care,
    Elizabethmarie

  6. #3936
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    HI again azureblue,
    Weight gain is sooo common, and it's 'cause your adrenal glands are pumping out cortisol, it makes you hold onto the weight... I'm guessing your exhaustion is adrenal related --
    I'd bet the weight will come off when your off the drug and totally clear of it...!
    Elizabethmarie

  7. #3937
    overtherainbow is offline Junior Member
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    Yesterday was a loooonnnngggggg day. Up at 2 in the morning, and not feeling sleepy during the day.

    My main 'plaint is this heart flopping. Palpitations. I can't sit still. Yesterday, my body needed to keep moving, in whatever way. Sitting still, I was constantly shifting, feeling the need to move something always.

    So after reading this thread (I hope to finish it all some time ! - I'm up to page 8), yesterday, I thought okay. I started back on the Lex, regular dose, and am now going to try halfing that for a number of days, and then halfing that. I do need to be systematic about this. If that's too much, I'll see about doing the liquid dilution method. I did manage to find that.

    I also took the regular Flexeril last night, and slept very well. I'm thinking I may need to get off/decrease Lex first, then Flex.

    Aunty, you are doing a great service here. I wish this thread was on a separate board somewhere where all this info could be organized.

    I'm still so mad I got blindsided, to find out I'm on a drug that has a withdrawal syndrome.

    What I want to know is, what happens when you stop/decrease this drug?

    Is there TOO much serotonin bathing the cells/receptors? Too little all of a sudden? It seems like there might be too much - hence the euphoria, UP-ness, and little need for sleep, AND the return of the libido (welcome back, I'm going to like that).

    If there's too much serotonin, is it okay to take SAM-E. I read someone was doing that. Does that make sense biochemically?

    And one should not take 5-HTP, as that is the precursor to serotonin, and would cause more serotonin in the system?

    I know magnesium is talked about here, as well. But isn't magnesium involved in the pathway as well? Wouldn't that give you more serotonin too?

    Sorry for the blabbing on and on. I would love to talk to someone / e-mail off-board. Any takers? I have a fairly good understanding of what might be going on, but I just need a sounding board.

    Have a good day all !

  8. #3938
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default overthe rainbow

    Using lexapro causes less receptors in the brain for the serotonin. Lexapro causes a reuptake of the serotonin so less serotonin is naturally produced and the receptor number decreses or shrivel up since they are not needed.

    In my understanding SAM e increases serotonin so I personally would be afraid to take it.

    In all my research I have not heard where magnesium uses the p 450 pathways for metabolism............could you show me a reference as to where you may have read this? I have severeal cytochrome charts involving the pathways used by lexapro and I do not even see magnesium listed on the chart at all for any medication. You may have very new research that I am unaware of so I am curious where you read this.

    After taking lexapro and stopping the brain has less receptors to utilize the serotonin so therefore one must be careful for about a year with any serotonin enhancing drug/herb or food, until the brain begins producing natural serotonin and the receptors regenerate. This can take about 18 months.

    Foods that increase serotonin are eggplant, turkey, tomatoes.

    It sounds like you may have a side effect of the lexapro use, I am sure the 5 Mg that you believe is a low dose is actually much higher due to the flexeril use. I will post a article on the side effect of constantly having to move.

    Exactly how have you decreased in the past? By decreasing by more then 10% of your current dose you are doing more harm to your body. I can speak from experience at having corresponded with a thousand people that have tried this method of Fast Tapering and regretted it. 5 to 10% decreases are the safest way to get off of lexapro.

    I will paste the article following this post.

  9. #3939
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default Akathisia during withdrawal from lexapro

    Article:

    Akathisia
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    Akathisia
    Classification & external resources ICD-9 781.0, 333.99
    DiseasesDB 32479
    MeSH D011595
    Akathisia (or "acathisia") is an often extremely unpleasant subjective sensation of "inner" restlessness that manifests itself with an inability to sit still or remain motionless, hence the origin of its name: Greek a (without) + kathesis (sitting). Its most common cause is as a side effect of medications, mainly neuroleptics, and rarely, antidepressants.

    Akathisia may range in intensity from a mild sense of disquiet or anxiety (which may be easily overlooked) to a total inability to sit still with overwhelming anxiety and severe dysphoria (manifesting as an almost indescribable sense of terror and doom). In the most severe cases, dysphoria can be so severe that the patient is literally compelled to take action, leading, possibly, to suicide attempts.

    It is not unknown to have patients (who have been treated most often with neuroleptics for psychotic episodes or prochlorperazine for nausea) to bolt out of hospitals or emergency rooms due to this odd and disconcerting emotion.

    Partially because the condition (and its attendant feeling) is difficult for the patient to describe, it is often misdiagnosed. When misdiagnosis occurs in neuroleptic-induced akathisia, more neuroleptics may be prescribed, potentially worsening the symptoms.

    The presence and severity of akathisia can be measured using the Barnes Akathisia Scale [1].

    Contents [hide]
    1 Causes
    2 Description
    3 Treatment
    4 References
    5 External links



    [edit] Causes
    Akathisia is most often the side effect of certain drugs - commonly seen in the antipsychotics, and less so in the others listed below:

    typical or atypical antipsychotics, such as haloperidol (Haldol®) and droperidol, olanzapine (Zyprexa®), aripiprazole (Abilify®); Pimozide is especially infamous for causing akathisia;
    SSRIs, such as paroxetine (Paxil®); see Healy (2006) reference, below, which focuses primarily on SSRIs and specifically paroxetine.
    Other antidepressants, such as the tricyclics and trazodone
    certain antihistamines, such as promethazine and diphenhydramine (Benadryl®);
    certain anti-emetic drugs, particularly the dopamine blockers (e.g. metoclopramide (Reglan®) and prochlorperazine (Compazine®)).
    certain drugs of abuse, such as GHB, methamphetamine and MDMA when administered in excessive doses.
    A 2006 U.K. study by Healy, Herxheimer, and Menkes observed that akathisia is often miscoded in antidepressant clinical trials as "agitation, emotional lability, and hyperkinesis (overactivity)" [2]. The study further points out that misuse of akathisia as simple motor restlessness occurs, but that this is more properly classed as dyskinesia. Healy, et. al., further show links between antidepressant-induced akathisia and violence, including suicide, as akathisia can "exacerbate psychopathology." The study goes on to state that there is extensive clinical evidence correlating akathisia with SSRI use, showing that approximately ten times as many patients on SSRIs as those on placebos showed symptoms severe enough to drop out of a trial (5.0% compared to 0.5%).


    [edit] Description
    Healy, et. al. (2006), described the following regarding akathisia: tension, insomnia, a sense of discomfort, motor restlessness, and marked anxiety and panic. Increased labile affect can result, such as weepiness. (Interestingly, in some people the opposite response to SSRIs occurs, in the form of emotional blunting. Sufficient clinical research has not yet been made in this area.) [3]

    [edit] Treatment
    Treatment includes the discontinuation or reduction of dose of the causative agent and the use of typical or atypical antipsychotics (also called major tranquilizers) to reduce the agitation and anxiety. Unfortunately, these neuroleptics are often the cause of the condition and are known to cause irreversible akathisia in some cases.[citation needed] While the administration of these drugs may temporarily ameliorate the symptoms, there is a serious risk of worsening the condition over the longterm.

    Therefore, some consider the drug of choice for the treatment of akathisia to be propranolol, along with other beta blockers such as metoprolol. The antihistamine cyproheptadine is also effective, though with shorter effect than beta blockers. Second-line treatments include benztropine and benadryl, though excess use of Benadryl may worsen symptoms. Most of the clinical cases of akathisia can be prevented by not administering the drugs that cause the condition.

    Recent studies have shown that Vitamin B6 is effective for the treatment of neuroleptic induced akathisia. [4]


    [edit] References
    ^ Barnes T.R.E. (1989). "A Rating Scale for Drug-Induced Akathisia". British Journal of Psychiatry 154: 672-76.
    ^ Healy D., Herxheimer A., Menkes D.B. (2006). "Antidepressants and Violence: Problems at the Interface of Medicine and Law.". PLoS Med 3 (9).
    ^ Healy D., Herxheimer A., Menkes D.B. (2006). "Antidepressants and Violence: Problems at the Interface of Medicine and Law.". PLoS Med 3 (9).
    ^ Lerner V., Bergman J., Statsenko N., Miodownik C. (2004). "Vitamin B6 treatment in acute neuroleptic-induced akathisia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study". J Clin Psychiatry 65 (11): 1550-4. PMID 15554771

  10. #3940
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Article:
    APPENDIX 1 SSRIs & MECHANISMS OF SUICIDE: 1

    Agitation/Akathisia
    The evidence that SSRIs cause agitation comes directly from the clinical trial programs run by the market authorization holders, where approximately 5% of patients have dropped out because of drug induced agitation. Rates of drop-out for agitation are significantly greater than for placebo.

    These clinical trial findings in depressed patients are corroborated by the results from healthy volunteer studies. In these phase 1 studies, the companies generally code akathisia to agitation or to hyperkinesis. The critical point that emerges from these studies is how the market authorization holders can argue that their drugs do not lead to suicide against a background of their drugs causing agitation severe enough to lead to drop-outs from clinical trials at an up to 5% rate - in addition to all the less severe forms of agitation caused – and to agitation at an approximately 25% rate, occurring in a dose dependent fashion, in healthy volunteers. These data were all in place from the 1980s. In their early clinical trial program with Prozac, Lilly and their investigators specifically noted the emergence of akathisia/agitation and arranged for the concomitant administration of benzodiazepines to minimize this problem.

    The fact that SSRIs cause akathisia has been conceded by company reviewers and by regulators and and a link between akathisia and suicide has been recognized by DSM-IV and company reviewers.

    It has been long recognized in the medical community that akathisia can cause suicidality and this fact has been extensively documented in the medical literature.

    The first emergence of this link came with reserpine, a psychotropic agent with comparable efficacy to SSRIs in trials for anxious depressives done in the 1950s (Davies and Shepherd 1955). This drug however led to suicide – and did so in the hypertensive patients to whom it was being given rather than in the psychiatric patients to whom it was also prescribed in higher doses (Healy and Savage 1998). It can be noted that despite causing suicide, reserpine is still prescribed to and can be effective for depressed patients (Price et al 1987).

    Such reactions were interpreted by some as evidence in favour of the then current theory that patients with essential hypertension had a suppressed rage close to the surface (Faucett et al 1957). A description by Ayd (1958), however, seems to point to something else - "they had motor restlessness which made their muscles taut, compelled them to pace the floor and did not permit them to sit without moving their legs".

    Akathisia was later confused with tardive dyskinesia. It was retrieved from the realm of the dyskinesias by Theodore Van Putten in 1975 who wrote that akathisia was a drug-induced psychosis, which had extremely bizarre characteristics with suicidal overtones. His descriptions make it clear that there are similarities between akathisia and symptoms such as anxiety, restlessness and agitation.

    In 1983, Shear et al. reported suicide associated with akathisia with treatment of depot fluphenazine.

    In a 1985 paper, Schulte linked akathisia with psychotic acts of murder and suicide. He wrote, "The following five cases are reported to bring attention to the potential for severe violence, as a result of akathisia, following such administration of a neuroleptic (major tranquilizer) for acute psychiatric symptoms."

    In another 1985 paper, Drake and Ehrlich reported further on the link between akathisia and suicide attempts.

    With the advent of the SSRIs, evidence emerged regarding SSRI-induced akathisia and suicidality. A rechallenge study conducted by Rothschild and Locke in McLean Hospital brought this out clearly. The authors described Prozac-induced emergent suicidality associated with akathisia in several patients. In order to test whether the emergent suicidality was coincidental or was associated in a cause and effect way with Prozac, they withdrew Prozac, then re-administered it and all three cases after having made a previous serious suicide attempt on Prozac experienced the exact same effect on rechallenge. "All three patients developed severe akathisia during treatment with fluoxetine and stated that the development of the akathisia made them feel suicidal and that it had precipitated their prior suicide attempts."

    Wirshing and Van Putten described a further set of patients who became suicidal during treatment with Prozac as follows: "[n]one (of the patients discussed) had a history of significant suicidal behavior; all described their distress as an intense and novel somatic-emotional state; all reported an urge to pace that paralleled the intensity of the distress; all experienced suicidal thoughts at the peak of their restless agitation; and all experienced a remission of their agitation, restlessness, pacing urge, and suicidality after the fluoxetine was discontinued."

    This article was followed up by the peer-reviewed article, "Akathisia, Suicidality and Fluoxetine," by Hamilton and Opler which ties SSRI-induced akathisia to suicidality, "[t]he proposed link between fluoxetine and suicidal ideation is explained by fluoxetine-induced akathisia and other dysphoric extrapyramidal reactions," and provides an extensive history of drug-induced akathisia causing suicidality:

    "Several reports already exist in the literature documenting the development of EPS [extrapyramidal symptoms] in association with fluoxetine, but without necessarily linking this to an increased incidence in suicidal ideation. Specifically, Lipinski et al. first reported the occurrence of akathisia in five patients treated with fluoxetine. Bouchard et al. reported that EPS developed in several of their patients while they were being treated with fluoxetine and in other patients the baseline levels of EPS worsened during fluoxetine treatment. Symptoms noted included bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, and akathisia. Tate reported that a patient who had previously tolerated haloperidol alone had an increase of EPS (including parkinsonism and akathisia) when fluoxetine was added. Stein reported a case of tardive dyskinesia that developed when a low dose of haloperidol was added to fluoxetine. In the case reported by Teicher et al., four of the six patients described complained of an inner restlessness which Opler has previously argued could reflect that they were experiencing akathisia. Wirshing et al. recently reported that five patients treated with fluoxetine experienced ‘agitation, restless motor movement, dysphoria, pacing, an internal sense of desperation, and suicidal ideation,’ and they too suggest ‘that fluoxetine-induced akathisia can lead to suicidal ruminations.’

    A separate clinical literature suggests that akathisia can at times lead to emergence of suicidal ideation. Akathisia is defined as an ‘inner sense of restlessness’ and an ‘inability to sit still.’ Patients who experience this often give reports such as ‘I feel like I’m jumping out of my skin.’ As akathisia is a common side effect of neuroleptic medications, information regarding subjective response to akathisia exists primarily, although not exclusively, in the literature on schizophrenia. In 1974 Van Putten et al. noted that nine schizophrenics treated with high-potency neuroleptics showed ‘behavioral toxicity’ associated with akathisia. Three of these patients developed de novo suicidal ideation. Schulte reported five cases of violent behavior, including completed suicides, as a result of akathisia in patients treated with neuroleptics. Shear et al. reported two cases of completed suicide by jumping in patients who the authors argue were suffering from akathisia. Drake and Ehrich also reported two cases of suicidal ideation secondary to akathisia. In one case the patient stated that he did not intend to die but that he would do anything to escape the intolerable feeling of restlessness. Drake and Ehrlich noted that these patients were unable to distinguish the akathisia from the ongoing symptoms of their psychiatric illness. Weiden reported that the use of prochlorperazine for nausea in a patient receiving chemotherapy led to akathisia which was very distressing to the patient. In 1986 Weddington and Banner successfully used chlorpromazine and metoclopramide to treat intractable hiccups but found that after 3 days of treatment the patient became restless, felt like he was ‘going crazy,’ and began obsessing about suicide. During a crossover study involving haloperidol and BW2344-U (which is characterized by the absence of dopamine receptor affinity), Shaw et al noted that during haloperidol treatment the patients experienced a clinical decline characterized by severe akathisia and an increase in violent behaviors as well as suicidal ideation and homicidal thinking. None of the symptoms were present with BW2344-U. In a 1987 review article, Van Putten et al. cite several studies in which it was noted that akathisia leads to suicidal ideation or homicidal thinking. They called this the ‘behavioral toxicity’ of antipsychotic medication. By 1988 Hermesh et al. began studying the use of propranolol to treat akathisia because of the authors’ familiarity with the above literature and their concern that akathisia might lead to suicide attempts."

  11. #3941
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default Lexapro use with RX sleeping pills and muscle relaxers

    Please use extreme caution when taking Lexapro with Muscle relaxants and sleeping pills such as ambien and lunesta as the combination can be fatal by slowing down you centeral nervous system and causing your heart to stop beating.

    Lexapro causes your body to speed up..................Rx sleeping pills and muscle relaxants cause the body to slow down....................this can be fatal.

    Anna Nichol's son was on Lexapro, Zoloft and Methodone.
    Autopsy: Drug cocktail killed Anna Nicole's son


    By MICHAEL MELIA
    Associated Press

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    Drug combo blamed in Smith's son's death
    Lawyer: I'm the father of her baby SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Anna Nicole Smith's 20-year-old son died from the accidental effect of methadone and two antidepressant drugs interacting in his system, according to a prominent American pathologist who conducted a private autopsy.

    The low levels of the three drugs detected by toxicology tests indicated Daniel Smith died "a tragic, accidental, drug-related death," Dr. Cyril Wecht told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

    Smith died Sept. 10 at his mother's hospital bedside in the Bahamas, where the reality TV star and former Playboy playmate was recuperating from giving birth to a daughter three days earlier.

    Wecht said Zoloft, Lexapro and methadone had a lethal "cumulative effect on the central nervous system" that ultimately stopped Smith's heart — a "classical" death resulting from a combination of drugs without an overdose of any one.

    "Oh my, that's a really lethal combination right there," said Lisa Johnson, a pharmacist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "If that's what he was on, it could very well have caused this."

    "The methadone will slow you down, but the other ones make your system speed up, so it's an odd combination," she said in an interview.

    Smith had reportedly been suffering depression related to a breakup with a girlfriend when he went to visit his mother and newborn half-sister in Nassau. Zoloft and Lexapro, which a U.S. doctor had prescribed, are antidepressants commonly used to treat anxiety and panic disorders.

    Wecht said he did not know why Smith was taking methadone, a pain-reliever that is also used to ease >>>>>> cravings for recovering addicts.

    "It is used for people who have been on >>>>>> or morphine," Wecht said from his home in the Pittsburgh area. "I have made those inquiries. I can only say to you no one has suggested anything having to do with drug addiction in this boy."

    A lawyer for Anna Nicole Smith said she hired Wecht, a forensic pathologist who gained fame as a consultant on celebrity cases including Elvis Presley's death, to end speculation about her son's death.

    He conducted the autopsy Sept. 17 at a downtown Nassau morgue, and signed a death certificate with the official pathologist that listed the cause as pending toxicology reports. He had previously ruled out the possibility of suicide or homicide.

    Wecht said he would share his results today with the examiner who conducted the official autopsy, but did not know whether they would issue a joint report on the cause.

    In Nassau, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez said he has not yet received official toxicology results, which will determine whether a jury inquest into the death is necessary. He declined to comment on Wecht's findings.

    Smith's body on Wednesday remained at a Bahamas funeral home hired by the family.

    Howard K. Stern, a lawyer for Anna Nicole Smith who was in the hospital room when Daniel died, told CNN's "Larry King Live" on Tuesday that he is the father of the 3-week-old baby girl, Dannie Lynn Hope.

    But photographer Larry Birkhead, a former boyfriend of Anna Nicole Smith, told Us Weekly magazine that he's the father and is seeking a DNA test to prove it.

    Stern said he plans to marry the 38-year-old celebrity "at some point."

    "Right now we have to somehow get through what we're going through," said Stern, adding: "And I'll tell you, our baby is the one ray of hope."

    Daniel Smith, who appeared several times on the E! reality series "The Anna Nicole Show," was the son of Anna Nicole and Bill Smith, who married in 1985 and divorced two years later.

    Anna Nicole married Texas oil tycoon J. Howard Marshall II in 1994, when she was 26 and he was 89. He died the following year and she has since been involved in legal disputes over the estate.

    ———

    Associated Press writer

  12. #3942
    overtherainbow is offline Junior Member
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    Hello Auntyb,

    You are a woman after my own heart - research, research, research !

    I am at work but will get a quick reply now.

    Lexapro is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). That to me, means that Lexapro is sitting on the serotonin receptors, blocking serotonin from reuptake (or from being processed, metabolized). So, more free serotonin available in the cells.

    So, if I am also taking 5-HTP, and other things that positively affect serotonin at the same time, I'd be getting too much serotonin, or headed for serotonin syndrome. That may be what happens in this withdrawal syndrome - there's TOO MUCH serotonin. As you said, there are fewer receptors post-SSRI, and there needs to be time for those to repair / regenerate. (Need some more info as to what exactly is going on there.)

    After seeing the naturopath on Apr 12, I would say I started decreasing then, as well as started taking the homeopathic with 5-HTP, magnesium malate (his choice of magnesium), vitamin B complex, and omega-3's. I believe all of this are involved with proper neurotransmitter/serotonin functioning.

    Re magnesium - I don't have anything specifically. The book states that magnesium is ubiquitous ! and is involved in hundreds of processes in the body. I have a book called the Miracle of Magnesium - I came on board to the idea that magnesium was something we were all deficient in, and all needed, following worsening of migraine headaches. I'll look at her book later at home. If you google magnesium and neurotransmitters, you may get a hint as to what some say.

    So back to the change in what I was doing. I started all of the things the naturopath advised AND started decreasing Lex & Flex. I must admit I was not being very systematic about it - I was too busy to pay attention, and didn't think it really mattered, since I've been on Prozac before, and had no trouble w/d. I was flying like a kite !!!!! and then all this heart flip-flopping started showing up last week, and increased by until yesterday, it was bad bad bad !

    So I took a dose of Lex yesterday, and will try to decrease that dose by 1/2 and see how I do for a week or so. I'm not up to doing the dilution thing yet. My brain will 'splode. I will not resume any of what the naturopath advised me, yet.

    I also took Flex last night and slept gooooood ! So feeling much better today. The heart has calmed down. So maybe decrease the Lex first, and then the Flex. It's going to be a long long wild ride. Blech !

    BTW, I have never had the brain zaps peeps are talking about.

    So much for a quick reply !

    Gratefully yours !

    OTR

  13. #3943
    spatzkey is offline New Member
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    This may seem like a really stupid question... I am wondering if someone who is supper hyper by nature and who as a child was majorly hyper( to the point the doctors wanted to put them on meds for ADD ) as an adult if they take Lexapro or an antidepressant isn't or couldn't it be kinda drangerous. I am just wondering because don't these meds give you energy? And if you already have that "energy" to begin with then isn't there to much or can there be too much in combination with medication? And if so, then would the end result be mania or something of that sort? Sorry if the questions seem silly, but I really wonder what the effects usually are if your personality is already energetic.

  14. #3944
    overtherainbow is offline Junior Member
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    Aunty:

    I'll be quoting from Carolyn Dean's "The Miracle of Magnesium."

    In short, what I could find, is "serotonin depends on magnesium for its function and production." It is a "necessary contributor for release and the uptake of serotonin by brain cells. With proper amounts of magnesium, nature makes sufficient serotonin and you experience emotional balance."

    "SSRIs create artifically elevated levels of serotonin in the body by preventing its breakdown and elimination; serotonin lingers longer in the brain and theoretically causes mood elevation." She says 'theoretically' as everyone has a different reaction to the manipulation of their brain chemicals, and we all know of some extreme examples of that.

    When I went on Lexapro, the prescriber wanted to get me up to the 'therapeutic dose'. Well, guess what, that wasn't therapeutic for me !

    Back to magnesium. I am so on board that magnesium is important for mood.

    I'm just wondering whether in my case what's okay to take, in a supportive manner, while I'm trying to come off two potent drugs that have messed up my receptors and neurotransmitter balance.

    I don't know if this was posted before, but wikipedia has a fairly good summary of the SSRI withdrawal syndrome.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSRI_di...ation_syndrome

    (I LOVE wikipedia !)

    I am soooo sorry I ever went on an SSRI, and in particular, this SSRI.

    I hope your daughter is doing better. I have to get through those 120 pages.

    Rain'

    PS Spatzkey, if you're reading, I was never super hyper by nature.

  15. #3945
    abracazapya is offline New Member
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    Aunty,

    I have been following this thread over the past six months, sometimes reading for hours during those long, lonely evenings when I thought I was losing my mind. Reading about the experiences of others both scared me and also gave me hope. I regret not sharing my experiences, but maybe I'll start now. Here's a short summary of what happened. My doc put me on 10 mg for depression back in Sept 06, basically calling it a wonder drug with no side effects. After a couple months, I felt more depressed than ever, and asked him how to get off of it. He told me to take a half for a couple more days, then stop. Simple as that. WOW. Within days I was crazy, hearing things, seeing things, and worst of all.....The Zaps. I could barely function. I called my doc and he referred me to a neurologist! Can you believe that? And he didn't have an opening for about 2 months! Well, I put 2 and 2 together on my own, started the Lex again(5mg), and my symptoms cleared up by the next morning. Both my neurologist and doc claimed to have never heard of such a thing. Anyway, I found this thread and started the first of many taper attempts. I felt so horrible, the thought of a 1 - 2 year taper seemed impossible. So I did the 50% taper, 1 week at a time. Ummmm.......doesn't work. Tried the 25% taper, 2 weeks at a time. Nope. I finally ended up going down 1 mg at a time, from 5 mg)for about 3 weeks each. I don't recommend this, I experienced some discomfort and consistent, though milder zaps. After a few more weeks, the zaps disappeared, and I felt better than I had in years! This was a couple of months ago, and recently the zaps have come back mildly in the evenings. When I last visited my doctor and told him everything I had experienced and learned, he did some research and told me a dose of Prozac can help with the zaps. I got a script filled as a last resort. Well, tonight I took one. My question to you, Aunty, is what do I do? Do I somehow keep trudging forward and hope these zaps will go away some day? When? Years? My understanding from your posts is that my receptors need to grow anew, is there anything I can do to help this process? Please advise Aunty. Thank you for all of your work and care. There are probably many more people like me who are reading silently. Sorry this is so long.

  16. #3946
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default abra

    I would love to exactly understand how you tapered and over what time frame before I can suggest anything.

    I know you had a couple of failed attemps to taper. Please explain when you started tapering, how long were you on the 5 Mg of lexapro?

    How did you atper and when did you get to zero. Explain the withdrawals that you experienced in detail, sleeplessness? moody, sweating? Zaps? mania?

    What supplements or vitamins are you taking?

    What dose of prozac did your doctor put you on and is it one dose or will you taper the prozac dose. Prozac has a ling half life so withdrawals will be about 30 days after the last dose. This has worked for some and not for others.

    If I am understanding this correctly the zaps went away and returned? How long have you been off the lexapro. Have you experience any depersonalization yet?

    The more information I have the more I can ubderstand what you are experiencing.

  17. #3947
    hbco2 is offline New Member
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    Pretty much any drug that alters neurochemicals will give withdrawal symptoms usually opposite of what they were designed to relieve... because your body has to learn how to re-make the serotonin. When you have a drug that leaves extra serotonin in the synapse for a while longer your body won't make as much... it down regulates production. That is why it is usually tapered off, to give your body time to start making adequate amts again.Thus if you take a ssri for a long time or high dosage you can get really bad withdrawal symptoms....

    Just because a doctor says it isn't "addictive" doesn't mean the body can develop dependence to it. It is what the human body does... it adjusts to maintaiin homeostasis.

    Some people don't have any problems getting off ssri's at all. Others have to take it slower.

  18. #3948
    NewMom_on_Lexapro is offline New Member
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    Default How do I stop these symptoms? LEXAPRO WITHDRAWL

    Hi People!

    I have been reading your posts and I am mainly looking to see if any of you know what can I take, perhaps some natural supplement that will help me with the withdrawal symptoms I am getting from stopping my Lexapro.

    I started Lexapro shortly after I had my daughter, to battle with Post-Partum. I started at 10 mg. I felt great relativeley quickly and then my body sort of like plato'd and I double up on it. I have been taking 20 mg for about 8-10 months now. I have been feeling great and I decided that it was time to start lowering my dosage and eventually stop, as my husband and I decided we wanted to have another baby.

    I started taking 10 mg's and I did that for about 2 weeks. I felt fine. I then started taking the 10 mg. every other day, for about 2 weeks as well. RIght now I haven't taken it for about 1 full week and I feel like a freak! I am dizzy all the time and naucious. I mainly get headaches and feel really really dizzy.

    Please tell me what can I do or take to relieve these symptoms?

    Thank you!

  19. #3949
    KEITH L.I is offline New Member
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    Default It's Been 5 Weeks

    I'm new to this site..thank god I found it.I have been off lexapro 10 mg for my fifth week.And yes it's been horrible from the first week on.I went cold turkey(big mistake),well I learned my lesson in a big way.A question,Im starting to have some good days and the dizziness isn't as severe as it was a few weeks ago,it's still there though and some days are worst than others.My bad dreams are going away.Do you think I'm on the road back,or should I go back to a dose and wean myself off? Can somebody explain to me the stages of recovery?Thanks Keith

  20. #3950
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    Hi Aunty, everyone,
    I just talked with a doctor/neurologist/psychiatrist who's an expert in the ssri adverse reaction - he wanted to know my case as I was a different one..! Anyways, it was really good to get some actual info - I'm almost at 5 months off, and he said I'm having parkinsonianlike motor problems, that's probably going along with the blackouts/seizures, all from the drug reaction DEFINITELY.. yay! of course, it doesn't take it away, but he said there is no drug in the body now, but only damage due to neurotoxicity damage that occured when on the drug/bad reaction... so! yay, validation from an expert is so great! makes me feel better, in some way,..
    just wanted to share...
    hope all are doing well,
    Elizabethmarie

  21. #3951
    overtherainbow is offline Junior Member
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    Default Elizabethmaria

    Wow, EM, wow, is all I can say. Its horrible what you've been through. How did you find this expert? Does he think this will get better ? ? ? I HOPE !

    I've had a lot of problems while on Lex, and I thought it was left over stuff from Lyme. I now wonder whether it was the drugs after all.

  22. #3952
    Long Island Girl is offline New Member
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    Default Cognite Therapy instead of Lexapro?...Please Help

    Hi Everyone,

    I am new to this...I'm really in need of support, so I thought I'd give this a try. I just got married last month and my fourteen year old daughter and I moved to my husband's home.The change has been wonderful and tough, but what's really made it tough is taking the lexapro. I have no sex drive ( not a good thing on your honeymoon!) and I feel like all of my emotions have become numb, and to me this is just as bad as depression.

    I decided to get more involved in my cognitive therapy,(which is drug free) My Dr. believes that my use of deep breathing, meditation & P. Rochsi (neuro bio-feedback) will completely change my brain's chemistry naturally and ultimately do what the lexapro is supposed to do.

    I'm afraid of the withdrawal, I currently take 30 mgs. a day and have just cut it back to 25 mgs for the last 3 days.

    I'm not liking feeling this way at the beginning of my marriage. He's a wonderful man & supports me fully, but I know it has been hard for him.

    Is there anyone who believes in cognite therapy over Lexapro? I didn't realize how many people are going through these same issues addressed. I'm upset because my Doctor (psych.) didn't warn me of all of these withrawal symptons. I wish you all the best, God Bless

  23. #3953
    elfaygobaca is offline New Member
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    Hi, Keith
    I have been off MY Lexapro for about a week and a half (also cold turkey), and I have noticed a BIG improvenemt in my withdrawl symptoms. I still have the random "zap", or some dizziness, but am overall much better. I would say, one ex-Lex user to another, to see if you can go without starting it up again. Others on this site may have different opinions, but I personally tried the "wait and see" approach, and have not felt this great in months.

    I don't specifically know the stages of recovery, but feel that as long as your symptoms are getting farther and farther apart, you are on your way to being OK again.

  24. #3954
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default Kieth

    I can only tell you what I would do based on my experience talking with others. You only have six weeks to reinstate after a cold turkey. I have so many that months and even years have passed and they would give any amount of money to have the chance you now have.

    The physical symptoms may be improving but there may be months ahead that will be tough. You brain has adapted to the lexapro and the misfiring of the neurotransmiters are the zaps so many people feel. The chemistry of you brain was chemically changed from lexapro and by stopping cold turkey,,,,you basically pulled the rug out.

    If it was someone in my family...................I would strongly advise them to go back on a small dose....................maybe 2 or 3 Mg and then slowly taper off from that. This way you are giving the neurotransmitters a chance to adapt to functioning with lesser amounts of lexapro/

    Many have gone cold turkey but in the end it could take up to 18 months to feel like you are back to normal. Depersonalization is a common withdrawal for those that tapered quickly or cold turkeyed. This will not appear for a couple of months.

    The fact that you did have such strong withdrawal symptoms the first few weeks is evidence that some damage/dependency has taken place..............do I think you are nearing the end of the withdrawals..................to be very honest.....................no.

    You have a few days to think about it. After six weeks it will too late to reinstate. Others that have cold turkeyed.............................please offer your opinions.......................I may just hear of the serious cases and possibly there may be some that breezed thru.

    Good luck whatever your choice may be.

  25. #3955
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default Long island Girl

    Yes I do believe in Codnitive therapy, Vitamins, Supplements, Exercise will treat depression......anything over lexapro. Please read the previous posts so you can get a idea of what you may expect from withdrawaing. 30 Mg is a high dose of lexapro so you can taper off in larger increments at first. Withdrawals take between 4 and 7 days to be noticed.

    Congrats on the marriage.

  26. #3956
    auntybiotic is offline Senior Member
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    Default New Mom,

    Omega 3, s will help, Inisitol will also aleviate some of the symptoms but I would not suggest stopping the lexapro so quickly.

    You may experience, vivid nightmares, stomach cramping, dizziness, headaches, depersonalization, inability to sleep, anxiety and the imfamous ZAPS which are your neuritransmitters misfiring........just to name a few.

    Tapering slowly would be much easier on the neurotransmitters in your brain. You can reisnstate up to six weeks after stopping lexapro and then slowly taper..................the choice is up to you.
    Good luck

  27. #3957
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    Keith,
    I can only give you my experience, but cannot say it is the same for everyone, though I know as aunty and others know that this is very common. I had a very bad reaction on the drugs and had to be taken off immediately - that was in the beginning of December. The pain the first few weeks was horrendous, but I did make it through - things gradually improved, but when I hit the third month, it was dreadful. I had/still have seizures, blackouts, super depersonalization, inability to think, major memory loss, movement problems (dystonia/dyskinesia).. I am now at 5 months off just about, and at my 3rd month, though I was able to work before, I had to stop as it was impossible, I also cannot drive now because of the seizures, though I was before..
    When they say you are probably not through with the withdrawals, it is true - everyone is different though. I was almost certain I would not have the 3 month regression as I only took for a very short period of time (few days/weeks) but I was wrong.. I could not taper as being on the drug, no matter how awful it is now, was still much worse and was giving me brain damage...
    If you can taper still, even going back to a low dose, and tapering, it is probably a very good idea... no matter how good you may feel now, something will happen at the third/fourth/fifth month mark, it's almost guarenteed -- and unfortunately toughing it out isn't possible - when your brain is affected, it changes everything and is very painful...
    Perhaps you will have only mild symtoms then, but seeing how difficult a time you had in the beginning, that's a major clue that hard times are yet to come --- I don't want to seem like a downer, but just hope to prevent you from going through needless pain! take care of yourself -- read/research here and you'll get a good idea of what's going on, what to expect...
    take care, you're in our prayers,
    Elizabethmarie

  28. #3958
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    Keith,
    I can only give you my experience, but cannot say it is the same for everyone, though I know as aunty and others know that this is very common. I had a very bad reaction on the drugs and had to be taken off immediately - that was in the beginning of December. The pain the first few weeks was horrendous, but I did make it through - things gradually improved, but when I hit the third month, it was dreadful. I had/still have seizures, blackouts, super depersonalization, inability to think, major memory loss, movement problems (dystonia/dyskinesia).. I am now at 5 months off just about, and at my 3rd month, though I was able to work before, I had to stop as it was impossible, I also cannot drive now because of the seizures, though I was before..
    When they say you are probably not through with the withdrawals, it is true - everyone is different though. I was almost certain I would not have the 3 month regression as I only took for a very short period of time (few days/weeks) but I was wrong.. I could not taper as being on the drug, no matter how awful it is now, was still much worse and was giving me brain damage...
    If you can taper still, even going back to a low dose, and tapering, it is probably a very good idea... no matter how good you may feel now, something will happen at the third/fourth/fifth month mark, it's almost guarenteed -- and unfortunately toughing it out isn't possible - when your brain is affected, it changes everything and is very painful...
    Perhaps you will have only mild symtoms then, but seeing how difficult a time you had in the beginning, that's a major clue that hard times are yet to come --- I don't want to seem like a downer, but just hope to prevent you from going through needless pain! take care of yourself -- read/research here and you'll get a good idea of what's going on, what to expect...
    take care, you're in our prayers, ..
    Elizabethmarie

  29. #3959
    nona007 is offline New Member
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    Default lexapro

    i have been without my lexapro for 1 week and i am feeling very panicky and crying all the time. I have started the 20 mlg again will this feeling of helplessness go away?

  30. #3960
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    Default Taper, taper, taper

    Hello, everyone! It is now 4 weeks off the Lexapro after a slow taper-not as slow as should have been but took approximately 2 or months minus a few days. Had no idea how much it was going to impact my life or I would have been more precise with dates. And my memory is still shot. I can't remember simple things some days. Still stopping in the middle of sentences and can't remember what I was saying. I love to read and there is no hope of reading anything that is going to require much thinking. I am doing ok, just tired after my spicy crawfish incident. PEOPLE, WATCH OUT FOR THOSE SPICES. And, yes, I did wonder about MSG. I am going to do without eating out, since it is hard to tell what is added during cooking. Not worth the pain.
    Elizabethmarie-I wish none of this had happened but am clapping over the doctor admitting what is happening to you. I know you knew you were not imagining it but it is sure great to have someone say it-besides all of us,lol.

    So many new people! You all are at the right place. I have learned so much from this site as well as benefitted from the support. My big words of wisdom are to taper slowly. I was on 10 mgs and thought a drop to 5 was doable-nope, don't do it. My advice is if you are on the pill dose and don't want to go get the liquid, convert it to liquid as Aunty advised. Stupid me, I didn't even think there was a way to do so, so I just used a pill cutter and did decreases, staying on the dose for approx. 3 weeks at a time. Problem with this is that it is impossible to get a precise small dosage that is needed. It takes time, but it is worth the effort. I do believe that there are people who 1. have no problems on this drug and 2. don't have trouble withdrawaling but the tapering is not that big of a deal when you consider the problems you can avoid. When tapering by minute amounts, the symptoms you experience are so much less and your body recovers more quickly. Even the small things like fatigue are more tolerable. And the closer to the 0mg mark, the tougher the symptoms seem to be. Also, read up on here about things that can be expected along the way. It is going to pay to proactively plan for possible depression and anxiety bouts that may occur. Also, the supplements may seem like a minor thing but they are not. I am so lazy about this, since a few days go by without taking them and I feel fine and forget about them. Then I start feeling awful and remember, "oh, yeah, the supplements" so do what I say and not what I do
    I also want to say that any and all suffering is worth getting off this medication. I am by no way back to normal, but I feel it happening and it is nice. Hope this makes sense. My mind is having a very cloudy time lately

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