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Melatonin
  1. #1
    WalkingInMemphis is offline New Member
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    Default Melatonin

    Anyone with expierence using Melatonin to help with sleep problesm?

  2. #2
    looktothesky is offline New Member
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    I used it a couple years ago when I was having sleep problems...I think it was more of a placebo effect...I slept because I thought the Melatonin was helping, but I find that a cup of chamomile tea can do pretty much the same thing

  3. #3
    Sleepycat is offline New Member
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    Melatonin can help some people with sleep problems, although the success rate varies from person to person. It's best to seek professional medical advice, to see if it's right for you.

  4. #4
    pharmd06 is offline Member
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    altough it makes sense to give melatonin, studies have really never showed that it works for sleep. it has shown benefit in jet lag.

  5. #5
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    Taking neurotransmitters internally isn't well enough documented to be truly safe yet. I've heard good things about melatonin, but IMHO we don't know enough yet.

  6. #6
    nowuccas is offline New Member
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    Default Melatonin

    It has been shown to cause the brain to produce less of it, when supplemented, and accordingly , should not be used on more than a very short term basis: a few times, at most, but I wouldn't recommend even that. Rather, use the following: Exercise, but not within 2 hours of bedtime. Have a warm bath, or shower, an hour before bedtime, then a glass of very warm milk, possibly with Horlicks, or one of the herbal teas, below, and use dimmer lighting. Put your mind in a position where it wants to shut itself off, and sleep. See insomnia treatments, in much more detail than can be included here, in section 3, at ezy build, below. Use one of the relaxation methods, in bed, after lights out, on pages 2, 11, 2.c, or 2.i, but they can take some time to learn, (progressive muscular relaxation excepted) so learn and become proficient in their use during the day.

    An alternative is to use the EFT, in section 53, and pages 2.q, and 2.o, saying to yourself: "Even though I currently have a sleep disorder, I deeply and completely accept myself." (or choose your own wording) while you use the acupressure tapping. The progressive muscle relaxation, (most easily learned) guided imagery, and mindfulness breathing are known to be effective, although I haven't tried the other 2 methods.

    Find out which works best for you, in the daylight hours, so you will be prepared, come bedtime. For many people, a good idea is to develop a set "wind down" routine for the last hour before bedtime, so your subconscious mind learns that it is time to put thinking aside, and prepare for mindfulness, (awareness, without cogitation/purposeful thought) or the EFT, in preparation for sleep, but the idea with mindfulness is to not even think about sleeping: just drift off, naturally, during exercising those techniques.

    Avoid TV, computer, or anything exciting in this hour, although reading a BORING! book is a good idea. I suggest that you try using the EMDR variant, below, prior to the mindfulness, or the progressive muscular relaxation, but after the EFT, if that method is chosen. Experiment, to find which combination works best for you.

    (The following is a variant of Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing therapy, which has been used successfully for those people suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, insomnia, and anxiety: it is easily learned, quick to use, yet can be very effective. It is easy to be dismissive of such a seemingly unusual technique, but give it a good tryout, for at least a few weeks, to see if it is effective in your case).

    Prior to using either of the methods in the above paragraph, first sit comfortably, and take a deep breath. Then, without moving your head, move your eyes from the left, to the right, and back again, taking around a second to do so (say: "a thousand and one": this takes approximately a second).

    Repeat this procedure (without the words, although you can count, subvocally, if you like) 20 times: "A thousand and one; a thousand and two... " and so on, to a thousand and twenty. Then close your eyes and relax. Become aware of any tension or discomfort you feel.

    Then open your eyes, and take another deep breath, and repeat step one, closing your eyes, and relaxing afterwards, in the same manner. Then, repeat the procedure one last time. Some people may find that this is all they need do.

    With experience, you may find that you can practise this in public, with your eyes closed, which greatly widens the window of opportunity for its use, and avoids attracting unwanted attention. I have found that the 2 - 3 minutes spent using the EMDR markedly reduces distractions to the relaxation process, and is repaid many times over.

    I also use it prior to my chosen relaxation technique, after lights out, at night. For more about Eye Movement Desensitisation & Reprocessing therapy, showing recommendations by those who have used it, including a professional psychotherapist with more than 20 years of experience in that field, see sections 33 - 34, at ezy-build.

    Usually, I have a cup of chamomile herbal tea, an hour before bedtime, and employ many of the techniques in section 3. Others may prefer Sleepytime, by Celestial Seasonings, Relax, Be Sleepy, or valerian root, from supermarket tea, or health food aisles.
    Last edited by ddcmod; 06-02-2010 at 02:51 PM.

  7. #7
    confusedvette is offline Junior Member
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    My dr has me on 9 mg of melatonin a night.....seems to work pretty well...

  8. #8
    Daid is offline New Member
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    Thumbs up Melatonin is a natural sleep hormone

    Melatonin is produced when you are in a completely dark room, if you have light invading the room your body will not produce it in the same manner as it would in a dark enviroment. As you age you lose the ability to produce melatonin.
    I've taken it for four months now, (3mg one hour before bed) and it works great. You should try a lesser dose and add a bit each night until you find the best dosage for you. It has no side effects if taken in the correct manner, that is about an hour before sleep and at the minimal dose that works for you. And using the lightest dose that works makes waking up pleasent and refreshing.
    Melatonin helps your body get back in touch with its Circadian Rhythm, the natural time our bodies set up to sleep/wake and the biologic processes that take place during that time are re-enabled, giving you a more productive sleep session and a more alert wake time.

  9. #9
    PeterRabbit2 is offline Senior Member
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    I use it on occasion and find it extremely effective.
    Peter

  10. #10
    maryygane is offline New Member
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    if you have lightweight invading the room your body will not make it in the identical kind as it would in a dark environment. As you age you misplace the proficiency to make melatonin. I've taken it for four months now, (3mg one hour before bed) and it works great. You should trial a lesser dose and add a bit each evening until you find the best dosage for you.

  11. #11
    Cat561 is offline New Member
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    I too Have Used Melatonin and it worked for Me .......

  12. #12
    LadayBrownEyez is offline New Member
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    Melatonin is very safe, Dr. Atkins stated in his writing that he used ten times the reccomended dose for his patient's sleep problems with no ill effects. There is absolutely no evidence that your body will not produce Melatonin on it's own if you supplement, that's entirely untrue. As we get older, the Pineal Gland does not produce as much Melatonin, therefore older people tend to sleep less. Melatonin is very safe, and effective, I have used it myself. Make sure your using a good brand, as with all supplements, herbs, vitamins and minerals, the FDA does not regulate their production, so some companies may not be using any Melatonin at all. You will wake up feeling refreshed, and not have that awful hang over effect.

  13. #13
    offsoon is offline New Member
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    sublingal melatonin works great!

  14. #14
    micheljohn is offline Banned
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    Melatonin helps to prevent from sleep problems without any side effect.

  15. #15
    myjade_84 is offline Junior Member
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    Melatonin is a hormone that helps regulates the sleep/wake cycle, an internal pacemaker that regulates the timing and our drive for sleep in humans. It causes drowsiness, lowers body temperature, slows metabolic functions, and puts the body into sleep mode.

  16. #16
    Sideffects2 is offline New Member
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    Very good to regulate sleep/wake cycle. Also it supposedly helps with movement problems at the 10 mg dose.Definitely worth a try.

  17. #17
    JordanJones5 is offline New Member
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    My friend suffered with sleep problems and was adviced Melatonin, It was effective for her, however she also suffered from issues of drowsiness & blood pressure problems, the doctor told her that it was due to Melatonin.

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