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drug induced dementia
  1. #1
    narsatya is offline New Member
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    Default drug induced dementia

    Did anyone of you face drug induced dementia or cognitive problems like ADHD slow processing speed through anti-psychotics risperidone and dyslexia, memory lapses through lithium toxicity? Then what naturopathic or biological treatment approaches have u made to restore those problems to original state?

  2. #2
    BGElectricity is offline New Member
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    Dementia is defined as a global impairment of higher cortical functions including memory, the capacity to solve problems of everyday living, the performance of learned perceptual motor skills, the correct use of social skills, and the control of emotional reactions in the absence of gross clouding of consciousness.

    Mental deterioration due to alcohol has been recognized for at least a century. The term "alcohol dementia" lacks a distinct defined pathology (Victor 1992). The first mention of a therapeutic drug-induced dementia was after the introduction of synthetic anticholinergic drugs for the treatment of Parkinson disease (Porteus and Ross 1956). The pathophysiology of memory loss associated with anticholinergic drugs was strengthened by the emergence of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory and by the demonstration that memory is adversely affected by the injection of scopolamine, but that these adverse effects are reversible by an injection of physostigmine (Drachman and Leavitt 1974). In the early days of levodopa therapy, its use was deemed responsible for dementia in Parkinson disease patients (Barbeau 1971; Wolf and Davis 1973). Dementia is now considered part of the natural progression of the disease rather than an effect of levodopa.

    Various terms are used to describe dementia associated with drugs. Patients on long-term phenytoin therapy have been reported to deteriorate intellectually in the absence of any signs of oversedation, a condition termed "Dilantin dementia" (Rosen 1968). Drug-induced dementias fall under the broad category of pseudodementias, which differentiates them from dementias associated with degenerative neurologic disorders, as well as under the category of reversible dementias, which implies that the manifestations improve following discontinuation of the offending drug.

    Contributors K K Jain MD, contributing editor. Dr. Jain is a consultant in neurology and has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.
    Last edited by ddcmod; 06-14-2011 at 05:44 PM.

  3. #3
    narsatya is offline New Member
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    Starr and Whalley make the following distinction: “Drug induced dementias reversed by withdrawal of the offending drug are probably best thought of within the spectrum of delirious states, while dementias that are drug-related and persist when the drug is withdrawn are, de facto, drug induced.” This is true in my case that cognitive deficits persist even long time after withdrawal of medications. But it is too said class of dementias in which cause is treatable i.e., in my case the offending drug is treatable. This definitely means by removal of offending drug dementia symptoms go away. But this statement is not true in my case. Hence is the paradox. Can you clarify upon this?

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