Diazepam and Alcohol / Food Interactions

There are 4 alcohol/food/lifestyle interactions with diazepam which include:

diazepam ↔ Caffeine

Minor Drug Interaction

One study has reported a 22% reduction in diazepam plasma levels when coadministered with caffeine. The exact mechanism of this interaction has not been specified. Physicians and patients should be aware that changes to caffeine consumption habits may impact the efficacy of diazepam therapy.

References

  1. Ghoneim MM, Hinrichs JV, Chiang CK, Loke WH "Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between caffeine and diazepam." J Clin Psychopharmacol 6 (1986): 75-80

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diazepam ↔ Alcohol (Ethanol)

Moderate Drug Interaction

GENERALLY AVOID: Acute ethanol ingestion may potentiate the CNS effects of many benzodiazepines. Tolerance may develop with chronic ethanol use. The mechanism may be decreased clearance of the benzodiazepines because of CYP450 hepatic enzyme inhibition. Also, it has been suggested that the cognitive deficits induced by benzodiazepines may be increased in patients who chronically consume large amounts of alcohol.

MANAGEMENT: Patients should be advised to avoid alcohol during benzodiazepine therapy.

References

  1. Divoll M, Greenblatt DJ, Lacasse Y, Shader RI "Benzodiazepine overdosage: plasma concentrations and clinical outcome." Psychopharmacology (Berl) 73 (1981): 381-3
  2. Ochs HR, Greenblatt DJ, Arendt RM, Hubbel W, Shader RI "Pharmacokinetic noninteraction of triazolam and ethanol." J Clin Psychopharmacol 4 (1984): 106-7
  3. Nichols JM, Martin F, Kirkby KC "A comparison of the effect of lorazepam on memory in heavy and low social drinkers." Psychopharmacology (Berl) 112 (1993): 475-82
View all 7 references

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diazepam ↔ food

Moderate Food Interaction

MONITOR: Grapefruit juice may increase the plasma concentrations of orally administered drugs that are substrates of the CYP450 3A4 isoenzyme. However, the interaction seems to affect primarily those drugs that undergo significant presystemic metabolism by CYP450 3A4 (i.e., drugs with low oral bioavailability), presumably due to the fact that grapefruit juice inhibits intestinal rather than hepatic CYP450 3A4. Because pharmacokinetic interactions involving grapefruit juice are often subject to a high degree of interpatient variability, the extent to which a given patient may be affected is difficult to predict.

MANAGEMENT: Patients who regularly consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice should be monitored for adverse effects and altered plasma concentrations of drugs that undergo significant presystemic metabolism by CYP450 3A4. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice should be avoided if an interaction is suspected. Orange juice is not expected to interact with these drugs.

References

  1. Gunston GD, Mehta U "Potentially serious drug interactions with grapefruit juice." S Afr Med J 90 (2000): 41
  2. Bailey DG, Arnold JMO, Spence JD "Grapefruit juice and drugs - how significant is the interaction." Clin Pharmacokinet 26 (1994): 91-8
  3. Bailey DG, Dresser GR, Kreeft JH, Munoz C, Freeman DJ, Bend JR "Grapefruit-felodipine interaction: Effect of unprocessed fruit and probable active ingredients." Clin Pharmacol Ther 68 (2000): 468-77
View all 32 references

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Obesity

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

benzodiazepines - obesity

The plasma half-lives of benzodiazepines may be prolonged in obese patients, presumably due to increased distribution into fat. Marked increases in distribution (> 100%) have been reported for diazepam and midazolam, and moderate increases (25% to 100%) for alprazolam, lorazepam, and oxazepam. Therapy with benzodiazepines should be administered cautiously in obese patients, with careful monitoring of CNS status. Longer dosing intervals may be appropriate. When dosing by weight, loading doses should be based on actual body weight, while maintenance dose should be based on ideal body weight to avoid toxicity.

References

  1. "Product Information. Tranxene (clorazepate)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  2. "Product Information. Librium (chlordiazepoxide)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Ativan (lorazepam)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
View all 14 references

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There are 10 disease interactions with diazepam which include:

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2014 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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