Total protein

The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your blood. These are albumin and globulin.

Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues.

  • Albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels.
  • Globulins are an important part of your immune system.

How is the Test Performed?

A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand.

Preparation for the Test

Many medicines can interfere with blood test results.

  • Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.
  • Do not stop or change your medications without talking to your doctor first.

Why is the Test Performed?

This test is often done to diagnose nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease.

If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more tests will need to be done to look for the exact cause of the problem.

Normal Results for Total protein

The normal range is 6.0 to 8.3 gm/dL (grams per deciliter).

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

The examples above show the common measurements for results for these tests. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different specimens.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Higher-than-normal levels may be due to:

Lower-than-normal levels may be due to:

Considerations

Total protein measurement may be increased during pregnancy.

References

Klein S. Protein-energy malnutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 222.

Landry DW, Bazari H. Approach to the patient with renal disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 116.

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Review Date: 5/5/2013
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
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