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Tensilon test

The Tensilon test is a method to help diagnose myasthenia gravis.

How is the Test Performed?

A medicine called Tensilon (also called edrophonium) or a dummy medicine (inactive placebo) is given during this test. The health care provider gives the medicine through one of your veins (intravenously, through an IV). You may also be given a medicine called atropine before receiving Tensilon so that you do not know you are getting the medicine.

You will be asked to perform some muscle movements over and over again, such as crossing and uncrossing your legs or getting up from a sitting position in a chair. The health care provider will check whether the Tensilon improves your muscle strength. If you have weakness of the eye or face muscles, the effect of the Tensilon on this will also be monitored.

The test may be repeated and you may have other Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions.

Preparation for the Test

No special preparation is usually necessary. Follow your health care provider's instructions about how to prepare.

How will the Test Feel?

You will feel a sharp prick as the IV needle is inserted. The drug may cause a feeling of a churning of the stomach or a slight feeling of increased heart rate, especially if Atropine is not given first.

Why is the Test Performed?

The test helps:

  • Diagnose myasthenia gravis
  • Tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other similar brain and nervous system conditions
  • Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase drugs

The test may also be done for conditions such as Lambert-Eaton syndrome.

What Abnormal Results Mean

In many patients with myasthenia gravis, the muscles will improve right after the Tensilon. The improvement lasts only a few minutes. For some types of myasthenia, Tensilon can make the weakness worse.

When the disease gets worse enough to need treatment (myasthenic crisis), there is a brief improvement in muscle strength.

When there is an overdose of anticholinesterase (cholinergic crisis), Tensilon will make the person even weaker.

Tensilon test Risks

The medicine used during the test may cause side effects, including fainting or breathing failure. This is why the test is done by a health care provider in a medical setting.

References

Huff JS. Special neurologic tests and procedures. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2009:chap 62.

Meriggioli MN, Sanders DB. Disorders of neuromuscular transmission. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 78.

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Review Date: 2/27/2013
Reviewed By: Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles and Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2014 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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