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A pingueculum is a common, non-cancerous growth of the conjunctiva. This is the clear, thin tissue that covers the white part of the eye (sclera). The growth occurs in the part of the conjunctiva that is exposed when the eye is open.

Causes of Pinguecula

The exact cause is unknown. Long-term sunlight exposure and eye irritation may be factors. Welding is a major job-related risk.

Pinguecula Symptoms

A pingueculum looks like a small, yellowish bump on the conjunctiva near the cornea. It can appear on either side of the cornea. However, it more often occurs on the nose (nasal) side. The growth may increase in size over many years.

Tests and Exams

An eye exam is often enough to diagnose this disorder.

Treatment of Pinguecula

No treatment is needed in most cases. Keeping the eye moist with artificial tears may help prevent the area from becoming inflamed. Temporary use of mild steroid eye drops can also be helpful. Rarely, the growth may need to be removed for comfort or for cosmetic reasons.

Prognosis (Outlook)

This condition is non-cancerous (benign) and the outlook is good.

Potential Complications

The pingueculum may grow over the cornea and block vision. When this happens, the growth is called a pterygium. These two conditions occur under similar conditions. However, they are thought to be separate diseases.

When to Contact a Health Professional

Call your health care provider if the pingueculum changes in size, shape, or color, or if you would like to have it removed.

Prevention of Pinguecula

Things you can do that may help prevent a pingueculum or keep the problem from getting worse include:

  • Keeping the eye well lubricated
  • Wearing good quality sunglasses
  • Avoiding eye irritants


Sugar A, Shtein RM. Pterygium and conjunctival degenerations In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 4.9.

Zloty P, Belin MW. Pterygium. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology. 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2032:vol 6; chap 35.

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Review Date: 11/5/2014
Reviewed By: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La Jolla, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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