Methanol test

Methanol is a toxic type of alcohol used for industrial and automotive purposes. It is not found in alcoholic beverages. It is sometimes called "wood alcohol."

A test can be done to measure the amount of methanol in your blood.

See also: Methanol poisoning

How is the Test Performed?

A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

Preparation for the Test

No special preparation is necessary.

How will the Test Feel?

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

Why is the Test Performed?

This test is done to see if you have methanol in your body. You should not drink methanol. However, some people accidentally drink methanol, or drink it on purpose as a substitute for grain alcohol (ethanol).

Methanol is extremely poisonous. As little as 2 tablespoons can be deadly to a child. About 2 to 8 ounces can be deadly for an adult. Methanol poisoning mainly affects the gastrointestinal, nervous, and ophthalmological (eye) systems.

Normal Results for Methanol test

No presence of methanol is normal.

What Abnormal Results Mean

No amount of methanol is normally found in the body. Its presence indicates possible poisoning.

Methanol test Risks

Veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight but may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

References

 

Ford MD. Acute poisoning. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds.Cecil Medicine. 24th ed.Philadelphia,PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 110.

Related Images

Review Date: 11/17/2011
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2014 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
Hide
(web4)