Vasopressin Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for Asystole

40 units intravenously once, followed by 20 mL of normal saline. If spontaneous circulation is not restored within 3 minutes, another 40 units may be given intravenously. If spontaneous circulation is still not restored, 1 mg of epinephrine maybe given intravenously. All doses should be followed with 20 mL of normal saline.

The use of vasopressin to treat asystole is not approved by the FDA.

Usual Adult Dose for Ventricular Fibrillation

40 units intravenously once, followed by 20 mL of normal saline. If spontaneous circulation is not restored within 3 minutes, another 40 units may be given intravenously. If spontaneous circulation is still not restored, 1 mg of epinephrine maybe given intravenously. All doses should be followed with 20 mL of normal saline.

The use of vasopressin to treat asystole is not approved by the FDA.

Usual Adult Dose for Ventricular Tachycardia

40 units intravenously once, followed by 20 mL of normal saline. If spontaneous circulation is not restored within 3 minutes, another 40 units may be given intravenously. If spontaneous circulation is still not restored, 1 mg of epinephrine maybe given intravenously. All doses should be followed with 20 mL of normal saline.

The use of vasopressin to treat asystole is not approved by the FDA.

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Insipidus

5 units to 10 units intramuscularly or subcutaneously 2 to 4 times a day.

Continuous IV infusion: 0.0005 units/kg/hour; double dosage as needed every 30 minutes to a maximum of 0.01 units/kg/hour.

Vasopressin can also be administered intranasally on cotton pledgets, by nasal spray, or by dropper. When vasopressin is administered intranasally by spray or on pledgets, the dosage must be individually titrated for each patient.

Usual Adult Dose for Postoperative Gas Pains

5 units intramuscularly once.

This dose may be doubled and repeated at three to four hour intervals as needed to prevent or relieve postoperative abdominal distention.

These recommendations apply also to distention complicating pneumonia or other acute toxemias.

Usual Adult Dose for Abdominal Distension Prior to Abdominal X-ray

10 units intramuscularly once 2 hours prior to X-ray and once again 30 minutes prior to X-ray.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

0.2 to 0.4 units/min by continuous intravenous infusion. Then titrate dose as needed (maximum dose: 0.8 units/minute); if bleeding stops, continue at same dose for 12 hours, then taper off over 24 to 48 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Diabetes Insipidus

2.5 units to 10 units intramuscularly once.

This dose may be repeated 2 to 3 times a day as needed.

Alternatively, a vasopressin infusion at 0.0005 units/kg/hour may be administered and titrated to restrict urine output and maintain a more concentrated urine.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Esophageal Varices with Bleeding

Continuous IV infusion:
Initial: 0.002-0.005 units/kg/minute; titrate dose as needed; maximum dose: 0.01 units/kg/minute.

Alternative: Initial: 0.1 units/minute; increase by 0.05 units/minute to a maximum of:
less than 5 years: 0.2 units/minute
5 to 12 years: 0.3 units/minute
over 12 years: 0.4 units/minute
If bleeding stops for 12 hours, then taper off over 24 to 48 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asystole

Limited data available: 0.4 units/kg IV after traditional resuscitation methods and at least two doses of epinephrine have been administered; Note: Due to insufficient evidence, no formal recommendations for or against the routine use of vasopressin during pediatric cardiac arrest are provided.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Ventricular Fibrillation

Limited data available: 0.4 units/kg IV after traditional resuscitation methods and at least two doses of epinephrine have been administered; Note: Due to insufficient evidence, no formal recommendations for or against the routine use of vasopressin during pediatric cardiac arrest are provided.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Ventricular Tachycardia

Limited data available: 0.4 units/kg IV after traditional resuscitation methods and at least two doses of epinephrine have been administered; Note: Due to insufficient evidence, no formal recommendations for or against the routine use of vasopressin during pediatric cardiac arrest are provided.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Since vasopressin is primarily metabolized by the liver, it is recommended that additional doses or dosage increments be made cautiously due to the increased risk of toxicity in patients with liver disease.

Dialysis

Data not available

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