Sucralfate Dosage

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

1 g orally on an empty stomach 4 times a day or alternatively,
2 g orally on an empty stomach 2 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis

1 g orally on an empty stomach twice a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer

1 g orally on an empty stomach 4 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

1 g orally on an empty stomach 4 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

1 g orally on an empty stomach every 4 to 6 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Stomatitis

1 g (10 mL) topically as a suspension 4 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

1 g orally on an empty stomach twice a day.
This dose may be titrated based on serum phosphate levels.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Stomatitis

Safety and effectiveness of sucralfate in pediatric patients have not been established. However, the use of sucralfate may be appropriate in some situations.

Greater than 1 year: 250 to 500 mg (2.5 to 5 mL) topically as a suspension 4 times a day for treatment of stomatitis.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

While short-term therapy with sucralfate can result in complete healing of a duodenal ulcer, a successful course of treatment with sucralfate should not be expected to alter the posthealing frequency or severity of duodenal ulceration.

When sucralfate is given orally, small amounts of aluminum are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Concomitant use of sucralfate with other products that contain aluminum, such as aluminum-containing antacids, may increase the total body burden of aluminum. Patients with normal renal function receiving the recommended doses of sucralfate and concomitant medications adequately excrete aluminum in the urine. Patients receiving dialysis or those with chronic renal failure have impaired excretion of absorbed aluminum. Further, aluminum does not cross dialysis membranes because it is bound to albumin and transferring plasma proteins. Aluminum accumulation and toxicity (aluminum osteodystrophy, osteomalacia, encephalopathy) have been described in patients with renal impairment. Sucralfate should be used with caution in patients with chronic renal failure.

In general, dose selection for elderly patients should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Sucralfate is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because the elderly are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Therapy should be continued approximately 4 to 8 weeks depending on disease and severity.

Hide
(web3)