Propylthiouracil Dosage

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Hyperthyroidism

Initial: 100 to 150 mg orally every 8 hours. Rarely, a patient may require 200 to 300 mg orally every 8 hours. Initial doses are continued until 2 months after symptoms are fully controlled.

Maintenance: 100 to 150 mg/day in equally divided doses every 8 to 12 hours. Therapy is usually continued until spontaneous remission occurs (up to 1 to 2 years) or ablative therapy is undertaken.

Usual Adult Dose for Thyroid Storm

Initial: 100 to 200 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours on the first day of treatment.

Maintenance: once full control has been achieved on the initial dosage, gradually taper the dose to 100 to 150 mg daily, administered in equally divided doses every 8 hours.

Concomitant use of a beta-blocker is usually recommended to help control the symptoms of thyroid storm.

Usual Adult Dose for Alcoholic Liver Damage

100 mg orally 3 times a day. While data are limited, long-term administration (up to 2 years) may reduce mortality associated with alcoholic liver disease.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hyperthyroidism

Initial: 0 to 4 weeks: 5 to 10 mg/kg/day orally in equally divided doses administered every 8 hours.
1 month to 12 years: 5 to 7 mg/kg/day orally in equally divided doses administered every 8 hours.

Alternative: 6 to 10 years: 50 to 150 mg/day orally in equally divided doses administered every 8 hours.
Greater than or equal to 10 years:150 to 300 mg/day orally in equally divided doses administered every 8 hours.

Maintenance: 1/3 to 2/3 of the initial dose orally in equally divided doses administered every 8 to 12 hours; this begins usually after 2 months on an effective initial dosage.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

Dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Precautions

Propylthiouracil-induced agranulocytosis usually occurs during the first several months of therapy. All patients receiving propylthiouracil should be closely monitored and should be instructed to contact their doctors immediately if signs or symptoms of illness occur (sore throat, skin eruptions, fever, chills, headache, or general malaise). Leukocyte and differential counts should be performed in patients who develop fever or sore throat or other signs or symptoms of illness while receiving propylthiouracil.

Thyroid function should be monitored regularly in patients receiving propylthiouracil.

Fatal hepatic reactions have been reported rarely in patients receiving propylthiouracil. Symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction (e.g., anorexia, pruritus, right-upper-quadrant pain) should be evaluated promptly. Propylthiouracil should be discontinued immediately if abnormal liver function occurs.

Propylthiouracil may cause hypothrombinemia and bleeding. Prothrombin time should be monitored during therapy, especially prior to surgery.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Propylthiouracil is associated with rare but severe side effects, including agranulocytosis, hepatitis, and vasculitis. Fatalities have been reported. Patients receiving propylthiouracil should be closely monitored for adverse effects and should be instructed to immediately report signs and symptoms of illness such as sore throat, skin rashes, fever, chills, headache or general malaise.

In addition, propylthiouracil may cause hypoprothrombinemia and bleeding. The patient's International Normalized Ratio (INR) should be monitored during therapy, especially prior to surgery or other invasive procedures.

Hide
(web5)