Nizatidine Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

Initial: 300 mg orally once a day at bedtime, or alternatively may use 150 mg orally twice a day.
Maintenance: 150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis

150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer

300 mg orally once a day at bedtime, or alternatively may use 150 mg orally twice a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

150 mg twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

150 mg twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Dyspepsia

75 mg orally once or twice a day, taken right before or up to 60 minutes before eating.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Investigational:

Greater than 1 year (n=26): In mild to moderate reflux esophagitis: 10 mg/kg/day divided in two doses for 8 weeks.

Greater than or equal to 4 to 11 years (n=104): 6 mg/kg/day divided in two doses, one dose given at 9 PM the night before surgery, and the other given at 6:30 AM the day of surgery.

Renal Dose Adjustments

CrCl less than 20 mL/min: Initial dose: 150 mg orally every other day.
Maintenance dose: 150 mg orally every 3 days.

CrCl 20 to 50 mL/min: Initial dose: 150 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 150 mg orally every other day.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

In the geriatric population dosage adjustments may be warranted since it is more likely for elderly patients to have decreased renal function.

Precautions

Any gastric malignancies must be ruled out before the start of nizatidine treatment, since symptom relief may delay proper and timely diagnosis.

Nizatidine may cause a false positive result for urobilinogen with Multistix.

Clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Nizatidine is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be exercised in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function.

Safety and efficacy in pediatric patients have not been determined.

Dialysis

Hemodialysis: The ability of hemodialysis to remove nizatidine from the body has not been conclusively shown; however, due to its large volume of distribution, nizatidine is not expected to be efficiently removed from the body.

Other Comments

The duration of nizatidine therapy should generally not exceed 12 weeks.

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