Ibuprofen Dosage

This dosage information may not include all the information needed to use Ibuprofen safely and effectively. See additional information for Ibuprofen.

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea

200 to 400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis

Initial dose: 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
Maintenance dose: May be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Initial dose: 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
Maintenance dose: May be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Usual Adult Dose for Headache

Study (n=34) - Prevention of Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-induced headache:
600 mg orally 90 minutes prior to the initial ECT session

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

Oral: Mild to moderate pain:
200 to 400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Doses greater than 400 mg have not been proven to provide greater efficacy.

IV: (Patients should be well hydrated before IV ibuprofen administration):
Pain: 400 to 800 mg intravenously over 30 minutes every 6 hours as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Fever

Oral:
200 to 400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

IV: (Patients should be well hydrated before IV ibuprofen administration):
Fever: Initial: 400 mg intravenously over 30 minutes
Maintenance: 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 100 to 200 mg every 4 hours as needed.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fever

Greater than 6 months to 12 years:
5 mg/kg/dose for temperature less than 102.5 degrees F (39.2 degrees C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
10 mg/kg/dose for temperature greater than or equal to 102.5 degrees F (39.2 degrees C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

The recommended maximum daily dose is 40 mg/kg.

OTC pediatric labeling (analgesic, antipyretic): 6 months to 11 years: 7.5 mg/kg/dose every 6 to 8 hours; Maximum daily dose: 30 mg/kg

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pain

Infants and Children: 4 to 10 mg/kg orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
The recommended maximum daily dose is 40 mg/kg.

OTC pediatric labeling (analgesic, antipyretic): 6 months to 11 years: 7.5 mg/kg/dose every 6 to 8 hours; Maximum daily dose: 30 mg/kg

Usual Pediatric Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis

6 months to 12 years:
Usual: 30 to 40 mg/kg/day in 3 to 4 divided doses; start at lower end of dosing range and titrate; patients with milder disease may be treated with 20 mg/kg/day; doses greater than 40 mg/kg/day may increase risk of serious adverse effects; doses greater than 50 mg/kg/day have not been studied and are not recommended.
Maximum dose: 2.4 g/day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cystic Fibrosis

Oral: Chronic (greater than 4 years) twice daily dosing adjusted to maintain serum concentration of 50 to 100 mcg/mL has been associated with slowing of disease progression in pediatric patients with mild lung disease.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Patent Ductus Arteriosus

Ibuprofen lysine:
Gestational age 32 weeks or less, birth weight: 500 to 1500 g:
Initial dose: 10 mg/kg, followed by two doses of 5 mg/kg after 24 and 48 hours
Note: Use birth weight to calculate all doses. Hold second or third doses if urinary output is less than 0.6 mL/kg/hour; may give when laboratory studies indicate renal function is back to normal. A second course of treatment, alternative pharmacologic therapy, or surgery may be needed if the ductus arteriosus fails to close or reopens following the initial course of therapy.

Renal Dose Adjustments

In premature infants who present with marked oliguria or anuria (urinary output less than 0.6 mL/kg/hr) at the scheduled time of the second or third dose of ibuprofen lysine, no additional dosage should be given until laboratory studies indicate that renal function has returned to normal.

Use with caution in patients with significantly impaired renal function. A reduction in dosage should be anticipated to avoid drug accumulation.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Ibuprofen should be avoided in patients with severe hepatic disease.

Dose Adjustments

If the ductus arteriosus closes or is significantly reduced in size after completion of the first course of ibuprofen lysine, no further doses are necessary.

The smallest effective dose should be used. The dose should be tailored to each patient, and may be lowered or raised from the suggested doses depending on the severity of symptoms either at time of initiating drug therapy or as the patient responds or fails to respond.

In general, patients with rheumatoid arthritis seem to require higher doses than do patients with osteoarthritis.

Precautions

Infusion time for intravenous ibuprofen should be no less than 30 minutes.

Caution is advised when initiating treatment with ibuprofen IV in patients with considerable dehydration, fluid retention, or heart failure.

Safety and effectiveness of ibuprofen oral have not been established in pediatric patients (less than 18 years of age).

Safety and effectiveness of ibuprofen IV marketed as Calador (TM) have not been established in pediatric patients (less than 17 years of age).

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Stop ibuprofen use and consult with doctor if a child does not achieve any relief within the 24 hours of start of treatment, if fever or pain worsens or lasts more than 3 days, if redness or swelling is present in the painful area, or if any new symptoms appear.

Take with food or milk, if upset stomach or stomach pain occurs with use. If no improvement is seen within 2 to 4 weeks of start of therapy, an alternative NSAID should be considered.

Ibuprofen lysine should be administered carefully to avoid extravascular injection or leakage, as solution may be irritating to tissue.

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