Haloperidol Dosage

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Geriatric Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for ICU Agitation

Haloperidol lactate:
IV, intermittent: 0.03 to 0.15 mg/kg IV (2 to 10 mg) every 30 minutes to 6 hours.
IV, infusion: 3 to 25 mg/hour by continuous IV infusion, has been used for ventilator patients with agitation and delirium.

Usual Adult Dose for Dementia

For non-psychotic behavioral problems related to dementia:
Initial dose: 0.5 mg orally 2 to 3 times daily.
Maintenance dose: 0.5 to 3 mg orally 2 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Mania

Oral:
Initial dose: 0.5 to 5 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day
Maintenance dose: 1 to 30 mg/day in 2 or 3 divided doses. Infrequently, haloperidol has been used in doses above 100 mg for severely resistant patients; however, the limited clinical usage has not demonstrated the safety of prolonged administration of such doses.

Parenteral:
Haloperidol Lactate:
2 to 5 mg IM or IV for prompt control. May repeat every 4 to 8 hours. Doses up to 8 to 10 mg may be given intramuscularly. Acutely agitated patients may require hourly injections.

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

Oral:
1 to 5 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Parenteral:
Haloperidol lactate:
1 to 5 mg IM or IV every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Psychosis

Oral:
Initial dose: 0.5 to 5 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day.
Maintenance dose: 1 to 30 mg/day in 2 to 3 divided doses. Daily doses of up to 100 mg have been used. Infrequently, haloperidol has been used in doses above 100 mg for severely resistant patients; however, the limited clinical usage has not demonstrated the safety of prolonged administration of such doses.

Parenteral:
Haloperidol lactate:
2 to 5 mg IM or IV for prompt control. May repeat every 4 to 8 hours. Doses up to 8 to 10 mg may be given intramuscularly. Acutely agitated patients may require hourly injections.

Haloperidol decanoate:
Initial dose: 10 to 15 times the previous oral daily dose intramuscularly every 3 to 4 weeks. The initial dose should not exceed 100 mg and the balance should be given in 3 to 7 days. There is limited experience with doses greater than 450 mg/month. Do not give IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Tourette's Syndrome

Initial dose: 0.5 to 2 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day.
Maintenance dose: May increase every 5 to 7 days to 3 to 5 mg 2 to 3 times daily for more severe or resistant cases.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Psychosis

Oral:
Initial dose: 0.5 to 2 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day.
Maintenance dose: 1 to 30 mg/day in 2 to 3 divided doses. Daily doses of up to 100 mg have been used. Infrequently, haloperidol has been used in doses above 100 mg for severely resistant patients; however, the limited clinical usage has not demonstrated the safety of prolonged administration of such doses. The lowest possible effective dose should be used since geriatric patients are more sensitive to the adverse effects of haloperidol (e.g., tardive dyskinesia).

Parenteral:
Haloperidol Lactate:
2 to 5 mg IM or IV for prompt control. May repeat every 4 to 8 hours. Doses up to 8 to 10 mg may be given intramuscularly. Acutely agitated patients may require hourly injections.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Psychosis

Oral:
2 years or younger or less than 15 kg: Use is not recommended.
3 to 12 years and 15 to 40 kg:
Initial dose: 0.5 mg/day orally in 2 to 3 divided doses.
Maintenance dose: The daily dose may be increased every 5 to 7 days in 0.25 to 0.5 mg increments. The usual range is 0.05 to 0.15 mg/kg/day in 2 to 3 divided doses. There is little evidence that behavior improvement is further enhanced by doses greater than 6 mg/day.
13 to 18 years and greater than 40 kg:
Initial dose: 0.5 to 5 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day.
Maintenance dose: 1 to 30 mg/day in 2 to 3 divided doses. Daily doses of up to 100 mg have been used. Infrequently, haloperidol has been used in doses above 100 mg for severely resistant patients; however, the limited clinical usage has not demonstrated the safety of prolonged administration of such doses.

Parenteral:
Haloperidol lactate:
5 years younger: Use is not recommended.
6 to 12 years: 1 to 3 mg IM every 4 to 8 hours as needed (maximum 0.15 mg/kg/day). Patients should be switched to oral therapy as soon as possible.
13 to 18 years: 2 to 5 mg IM every 4 to 8 hours as needed.

Haloperidol decanoate:
17 year or younger: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tourette's Syndrome

2 years or younger or less than 15 kg: Use is not recommended.
3 to 12 years and 15 to 40 kg:
Initial dose: 0.5 mg/day orally in 2 to 3 divided doses.
Maintenance dose: The daily dose may be increased weekly in 0.25 to 0.5 mg increments up to 0.05 to 0.075 mg/kg/day. There is little evidence that behavior improvement is further enhanced by doses greater than 6 mg/day.
13 to 18 years and greater than 40 kg: 1 to 2 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day.

Renal Dose Adjustments

The manufacturer recommends caution when administering this drug to patients with renal dysfunction.

Liver Dose Adjustments

The manufacturer recommends caution when administering this drug to patients with liver dysfunction.

Dose Adjustments

Haloperidol has been associated with dose-dependent QT interval prolongation.

Precautions

Haloperidol is contraindicated in severe toxic central nervous system depression or comatose states from any cause and in individuals who have Parkinson's disease.

Sudden death has been reported in psychiatric patients treated with haloperidol. In addition, QT interval prolongation and Torsades de Pointes have been observed in patients treated with haloperidol. The risk of QT interval prolongation and Torsades de Pointes appears to be increased when larger than recommended dosages are used, and with intravenous administration. Patients with conditions that prolong the QT interval (e.g., cardiac abnormalities, hypothyroidism, long QT syndromes, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, electrolyte imbalances, drugs known to prolong QT, etc.) should be treated with caution. Haloperidol decanoate must never be given intravenously. Haloperidol lactate is not approved for intravenous use; however, if intravenous administration is given, the ECG should be monitored for QT prolongation and arrhythmias.

Dialysis

A supplemental dose is not necessary with dialysis.

Other Comments

Upon achieving a satisfactory therapeutic response, dosage should then be gradually reduced to the lowest effective maintenance level.

Hide
(web5)