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Potassium gluconate Disease Interactions

There are 6 disease interactions with potassium gluconate:

Potassium Salts (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Dehydration

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Dehydration, Diarrhea

Administration of potassium salts in severe dehydration may predispose to renal impairment. Therapy with potassium salts should be administered cautiously in patients with acute dehydration (e.g., due to severe or prolonged diarrhea or heat stress). Close monitoring of serum potassium concentrations is recommended, as potentially fatal hyperkalemia can develop rapidly and is often asymptomatic, manifested only by an increased potassium level (6.5 to 8 mEq/L) and characteristic electrocardiographic changes (peaking of T waves, loss of P waves, depression of ST segment, prolongation of the QT interval). Late manifestations include muscle paralysis and cardiovascular collapse from cardiac arrest (9 to 12 mEq/L). Continuous or serial electrocardiography may be appropriate in some patients during replacement therapy, particularly if given intravenously.

References

  1. "Product Information. Potassium Acetate (potassium acetate)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  2. "Product Information. K-Lyte (potassium bicarbonate-potassium citrate)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Kaon (potassium gluconate)." Savage Laboratories, Melville, NY.
View all 4 references

Potassium Salts (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Familial Periodic Paralysis

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Familial Periodic Paralysis

Administration of potassium salts may precipitate attacks in familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis or paramyotonia congenita. Therapy with potassium preparations should be administered cautiously in patients with these conditions.

References

  1. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):

Potassium Salts (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Hyperkalemia

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Hyperkalemia, Acidosis, Adrenal Insufficiency, Burns - External, Diabetes Mellitus, Hemolytic Anemia

The use of potassium salts is contraindicated in patients with hyperkalemia, since a further increase in serum potassium concentration in such patients can lead to cardiac arrhythmias or arrest. Potassium therapy should be administered cautiously in patients with conditions predisposing to hyperkalemia, such as chronic renal failure, systemic acidosis, acute dehydration, hypoaldosteronism (e.g., due to primary adrenal insufficiency or congenital adrenal enzyme deficiency), uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and extensive tissue breakdown (e.g., due to severe burns, intravascular hemolysis, tumor lysis syndrome, or rhabdomyolysis). Close monitoring of serum potassium concentrations is recommended, as potentially fatal hyperkalemia can develop rapidly and is often asymptomatic, manifested only by an increased potassium level (6.5 to 8 mEq/L) and characteristic electrocardiographic changes (peaking of T waves, loss of P waves, depression of ST segment, prolongation of the QT interval). Late manifestations include muscle paralysis and cardiovascular collapse from cardiac arrest (9 to 12 mEq/L). Continuous or serial electrocardiography may be appropriate in some patients during replacement therapy, particularly if given intravenously.

References

  1. Perez GO, Oster JR, Pelleya R, Caralis PV, Kem DC "Hyperkalemia from single small oral doses of potassium chloride." Nephron 36 (1984): 270-1
  2. "Product Information. Kaon (potassium gluconate)." Savage Laboratories, Melville, NY.
  3. Saxena K "Death from potassium chloride overdose." Postgrad Med 84 (1988): 97-8,101-2
View all 19 references

Potassium Salts (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

The use of potassium salts is contraindicated in patients with severe renal impairment characterized by oliguria, anuria, or azotemia. Since potassium is excreted by the kidney, the administration of potassium salts in such patients, particularly by the intravenous route, may produce hyperkalemia and cardiac arrhythmias or arrest. Therapy with potassium salts should be administered cautiously in patients with diminished renal function or other conditions which impairs potassium excretion (e.g. adrenal insufficiency). Close monitoring of serum potassium concentrations is recommended, as potentially fatal hyperkalemia can develop rapidly and is often asymptomatic, manifested only by an increased potassium level (6.5 to 8 mEq/L) and characteristic electrocardiographic changes (peaking of T waves, loss of P waves, depression of ST segment, prolongation of the QT interval). Late manifestations include muscle paralysis and cardiovascular collapse from cardiac arrest (9 to 12 mEq/L). Continuous or serial electrocardiography may be appropriate in some patients during replacement therapy, particularly if given intravenously.

References

  1. "Product Information. K-Dur (potassium chloride)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Urocit (potassium citrate)." Mission Pharmacal Company, San Antonio, TX.
  3. "Product Information. Kaon (potassium gluconate)." Savage Laboratories, Melville, NY.
View all 5 references

Potassium Salts (Oral) (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Gi Irritation

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Gastrointestinal Obstruction, Peptic Ulcer, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, History - Peptic Ulcer, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Gastrointestinal Perforation, Esophageal Disease

The use of all solid oral formulations of potassium is contraindicated in patients with arrested or delayed gastrointestinal (GI) transit, whether due to structural, pathological, or pharmacological causes. Potassium is irritating to the GI mucosa and may cause ulcerative and/or stenotic lesions during prolonged physical contact. Based on spontaneous adverse reaction reports, the frequency of small bowel lesions associated with enteric-coated preparations of potassium chloride is 40 to 50 per 100,000 patient-years, while that for wax matrix controlled-release formulations is less than one per 100,000 patient years. Esophageal ulceration has also been reported following administration of controlled-release formulations of potassium chloride in cardiac patients with esophageal compression due to enlarged left atrium. Potassium supplementation should be administered as a liquid preparation or as an aqueous suspension in patients with esophageal obstruction and/or delayed gastrointestinal transit time.
<br />
<br />Because of ulcerogenic effects, oral potassium should be administered cautiously in patients with peptic ulcers or other upper gastrointestinal diseases associated with inflammation, bleeding, or perforation. Patients should be advised not to crush, chew, or break potassium tablets or capsules, and to take them with meals and a full glass of water or other liquid. Potassium liquids should be diluted prior to consumption.

References

  1. Leijonmarck CE, Fenyo G, Raf L "Nontraumatic perforation of the small intestine." Acta Chir Scand 150 (1984): 405-11
  2. Jacobs E, Pringot J "Gastric ulcers due to the intake of potassium chloride." Am J Dig Dis 18 (1973): 289-94
  3. Delaney T, Hoxworth PI "Enteric-coated potassium chloride enteropathy." Surg Gynecol Obstet 127 (1968): 76-80
View all 73 references

Potassium Alkali Salts (Includes Potassium gluconate) ↔ Alkalosis

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Alkalosis

Hypokalemia in patients with metabolic or respiratory alkalosis should generally be treated with potassium chloride rather than an alkalinizing potassium salt (i.e. acetate, bicarbonate, citrate, or gluconate), since alkali therapy may exacerbate the condition. In addition, hypochloremia may accompany alkalosis, which is best treated with potassium chloride. Close monitoring of acid-base balance, serum electrolytes, electrocardiogram, and clinical status is recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. K-Lyte (potassium bicarbonate-potassium citrate)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Potassium Acetate (potassium acetate)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Kaon (potassium gluconate)." Savage Laboratories, Melville, NY.
View all 4 references

You should also know about...

potassium gluconate drug Interactions

There are 76 drug interactions with potassium gluconate

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2014 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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