Taclonex (betamethasone / calcipotriene topical) Disease Interactions

There are 6 disease interactions with Taclonex (betamethasone / calcipotriene topical):

Calcipotriene (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Hypercalcemia

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Hypercalcemia, Hypervitaminosis D, Poisoning by Vitamins

The use of calcipotriene topical preparations is contraindicated in patients with demonstrated hypercalcemia or evidence of vitamin D toxicity. Calcipotriene is a synthetic vitamin D3 analog. Systemic absorption of topically applied calcipotriene ranges from less than 1% for the scalp solution to 5% to 6% for the ointment. Calcipotriene has been reported to be 100 to 200 times less potent in its effects on calcium utilization than natural vitamin D, which facilitates the absorption of calcium in the intestine. Transient, rapidly reversible elevation of serum calcium has been reported following the topical administration of calcipotriene. If elevation in serum calcium outside the normal range occurs, treatment should be discontinued until normal calcium levels are restored. Patients should be advised to contact their physician if they experience early symptoms of hypercalcemia such as weakness, fatigue, somnolence, headache, anorexia, dry mouth, metallic taste, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, constipation, diarrhea, vertigo, tinnitus, ataxia, exanthema, muscle pain, bone pain, and irritability.

References

  1. Dubertret L, Wallach D, Souteyrand P, Perussel M, Kalis B, Meynadier J, Chevrant-Breton J, Beylot C, Bazex JA, Jurgensen HJ "Efficacy and safety of calcipotriol (MC 903) ointment in psoriasis vulgaris. A randomized, double-blind, right/left comparative, vehicle- controlled study." J Am Acad Dermatol 27 (1992): 983-8
  2. Bourke JF, Berth-Jones J, Iqbal SJ, Hutchinson PE "High-dose topical calcipotriol in the treatment of extensive psoriasis vulgaris." Br J Dermatol 129 (1993): 74-6
  3. Murdoch D, Clissold SP "Calcipotriol. A review of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic use in psoriasis vulgaris." Drugs 43 (1992): 415-29
View all 8 references

Topical Corticosteroids (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Diabetes Mellitus

Corticosteroids can raise blood glucose level by antagonizing the action and suppressing the secretion of insulin, which results in inhibition of peripheral glucose uptake and increased gluconeogenesis. Therapy with topical corticosteroids rarely produces these effects but should be administered cautiously nonetheless in patients with diabetes mellitus, glucose intolerance, or a predisposition to hyperglycemia. Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids may occur depending on the vehicle and concentration of the preparation, the size of the application area, the integrity of the skin, and the duration of administration. Use of occlusive dressings over the applied areas may also increase percutaneous absorption. Given equivalent doses, small children are generally at the greatest risk because of their larger skin surface to body mass ratios. If possible, the use of highly potent agents (e.g., augmented betamethasone, clobetasol, diflorasone, and halobetasol) should be avoided in children and limited to small areas for 2 weeks in adults.

References

  1. "Product Information. Decadron Phosphate, Topical (dexamethasone topical)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Cyclocort (amcinonide topical)." Fujisawa, Deerfield, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Proctocream HC 2.5% (hydrocortisone topical)." Schwarz Pharma, Mequon, WI.
View all 23 references

Topical Corticosteroids (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Diaper Rash

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Diaper Rash

Topical corticosteroids, especially the potent agents (e.g., augmented betamethasone, clobetasol, diflorasone, and halobetasol), are generally not recommended for use in the treatment of diaper rash. Topical corticosteroids may be systemically absorbed, depending on the vehicle and concentration of the preparation, the size of the application area, the duration of administration, and whether or not occlusive dressings are used. Given equivalent doses, small children are usually at the greatest risk for systemic toxicity such as adrenal suppression, Cushing's syndrome and intracranial hypertension because of their larger skin surface to body mass ratios. If topical corticosteroids are necessary to treat diaper rash, medium- to low-potency agents should preferably be used, and parents should be advised not to put tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants over the rash, since occlusion of treated area may increase percutaneous drug absorption.

References

  1. "Product Information. Proctocream HC 2.5% (hydrocortisone topical)." Schwarz Pharma, Mequon, WI.
  2. Reymann F, Kehlet H "Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical function. Association with topical application of betamethasone dipropionate." Arch Dermatol 115 (1979): 362-3
  3. "Product Information. Cloderm (clocortolone topical)" Hermal Pharmaceutical Labs Inc, Delmar, NY.
View all 37 references

Topical Corticosteroids (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Hyperadrenocorticism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Hyperadrenocorticism

The use of topical corticosteroids may rarely precipitate or aggravate conditions of hyperadrenocorticism. Topical corticosteroids may be systemically absorbed, depending on the vehicle and concentration of the preparation, the size of the application area, the duration of administration, and whether or not occlusive dressings are used. Given equivalent doses, small children are generally at the greatest risk because of their larger skin surface to body mass ratios. If possible, the use of highly potent agents (e.g., augmented betamethasone, clobetasol, diflorasone, and halobetasol) should be avoided in children and limited to small areas for 2 weeks in adults. The development of symptoms such as menstrual irregularities, acneiform lesions, cataracts and cushingoid features during topical corticosteroid therapy may indicate excessive use.

References

  1. Ruiz-Maldonado R, Zapata G, Lourdes T, Robles C "Cushing's syndrome after topical application of corticosteroids." Am J Dis Child 136 (1982): 274-5
  2. May P, Stein EJ, Ryter RJ, Hirsh FS, Michel B, Levy RP "Cushing syndrome from percutaneous absorption of triamcinolone cream." Arch Intern Med 136 (1976): 612-3
  3. "Product Information. Cutivate (fluticasone)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
View all 32 references

Topical Corticosteroids (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Infections

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Infection - Bacterial/Fungal/Protozoal/Viral, Tuberculosis -- Latent

Topical corticosteroids may be systemically absorbed, depending on the vehicle and concentration of the preparation, the size of the application area, the duration of administration, and whether or not occlusive dressings are used. Clinically significant local as well as systemic immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory effects may occur, which can cause or exacerbate an infection. Given equivalent doses, small children are generally at the greatest risk because of their larger skin surface to body mass ratios. Therapy with topical corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with latent or active infections, particularly if a potent agent is used on a large area for prolonged periods or if occlusive dressings are used. Effective antimicrobial therapy or other appropriate treatment should be instituted to treat the infection. If possible, the use of highly potent agents (e.g., augmented betamethasone, clobetasol, diflorasone, and halobetasol) should be avoided in children and limited to small areas for 2 weeks in adults. Occlusive dressings should not be used in patients with skin infection.

References

  1. "Product Information. Temovate (clobetasol)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. Macdonald A "Topical corticosteroid preparations. Hazards and side-effects." Br J Clin Pract 25 (1971): 421-5
  3. Pace WE "Topical corticosteroids." Can Med Assoc J 108 (1973): 11 passim
View all 24 references

Topical Corticosteroids (Includes Taclonex) ↔ Ocular Toxicities

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Cataracts, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension

Prolonged use of corticosteroids may cause posterior subcapsular cataracts and elevated intraocular pressure, the latter of which may lead to glaucoma and/or damage to the optic nerves. Therapy with topical corticosteroids rarely produces these effects but should be administered cautiously nonetheless in patients with a history of cataracts, glaucoma, or increased intraocular pressure, especially when potent agents (e.g., augmented betamethasone, clobetasol, diflorasone, and halobetasol) are used in the periorbital area. Topical corticosteroids may be systemically absorbed, depending on the vehicle and concentration of the preparation, the size of the application area, the duration of administration, and whether or not occlusive dressings are used. Given equivalent doses, small children are generally at the greatest risk because of their larger skin surface to body mass ratios.

References

  1. "Product Information. Cyclocort (amcinonide topical)." Fujisawa, Deerfield, IL.
  2. "Product Information. Lidex (fluocinonide)." Syntex Laboratories Inc, Palo Alto, CA.
  3. "Product Information. Psorcon (diflorasone topical)." Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Collegeville, PA.
View all 27 references

You should also know about...

Taclonex (betamethasone / calcipotriene topical) drug Interactions

There are 187 drug interactions with Taclonex (betamethasone / calcipotriene topical)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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