Ventolin (albuterol) Disease Interactions

There are 4 disease interactions with Ventolin (albuterol):

Beta-2 Adrenergic Bronchodilators (Includes Ventolin) ↔ Cardiovascular

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Heart Disease, Hypertension, Hyperthyroidism

Adrenergic bronchodilators can stimulate cardiovascular beta-1 and beta-2 receptors, resulting in adverse effects such as tachycardia, palpitation, peripheral vasodilation, blood pressure changes, and ECG changes (e.g., flattening of the T wave; prolongation of the QT interval; ST segment depression). Direct stimulation of cardiac tissues is mediated by beta-1 receptors and thus less likely to occur with beta-2-selective agents such as albuterol. However, beta-2-selectivity is not absolute and can be lost with larger doses. High dosages of these agents have been associated with precipitation or aggravation of angina, myocardial ischemia, and cardiac arrhythmias. Therapy with adrenergic bronchodilators should be administered cautiously in patients with sensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, hyperthyroidism, and/or underlying cardiovascular disorders such as coronary insufficiency, cardiac arrhythmias, or hypertension. The recommended dosages should not be exceeded. Systemic adverse effects are minimized, but not abolished, by administration of these agents via oral inhalation.

References

  1. Tranfa CME, Pelaia G, Grembiale RD, Naty S, Durante S, Borrello G "Short-term cardiovascular effects of salmeterol." Chest 113 (1998): 1272-6
  2. Price AH, Clissold SP "Salbutamol in the 1980s. A reappraisal of its clinical efficacy." Drugs 38 (1989): 77-122
  3. Chodosh S, Crooks LA, Tuck J "Comparative effects of pirbuterol acetate, metaproterenol, and placebo aerosols on pulmonary function and incidence of cardiac ectopy." J Asthma 26 (1989): 309-15
View all 50 references

Beta-2 Adrenergic Bronchodilators (Includes Ventolin) ↔ Diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Diabetes Mellitus

Adrenergic bronchodilators may cause increases in blood glucose concentrations. These effects are usually transient and slight, but may be significant with dosages higher than those normally recommended. Large doses of IV albuterol (not commercially available in the U.S.) and terbutaline sulfate have been reported to cause exacerbation of preexisting diabetes mellitus and ketoacidosis. Therapy with adrenergic bronchodilators should be administered cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus. Closer monitoring of blood glucose concentrations may be appropriate. Systemic adverse effects are minimized, but not abolished, by administration of these agents via oral inhalation.

References

  1. "Product Information. Ventolin (albuterol)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. Gawchik SM, Saccar CL, Noonan M, Reasner DS, DeGraw SS "The safety and efficacy of nebulized levalbuterol compared with racemic albuterol and placebo in the treatment of asthma in pediatric patients." J Allerg Clin Immunol 103 (1999): 615-21
  3. Meyer JM, Wenzel CL, Kradjan WA "Salmeterol: a novel, long-acting beta 2-agonist." Ann Pharmacother 27 (1993): 1478-87
View all 15 references

Beta-2 Adrenergic Bronchodilators (Includes Ventolin) ↔ Hypokalemia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hypokalemia

Adrenergic bronchodilators may cause decreases in serum potassium concentrations, primarily when given by nebulization or intravenous administration. Although this effect is usually transient and does not require supplementation, clinically significant hypokalemia may occur in some patients, with the potential to induce cardiovascular adverse effects. The relevance of these observations to oral or oral aerosol/powder for inhalation therapy is unknown. Therapy with adrenergic bronchodilators should be administered cautiously in patients with or predisposed to hypokalemia.

References

  1. Wong CS, Pavord ID, Williams J, Britton JR, Tattersfield AE "Bronchodilator, cardiovascular, and hypokalaemic effects of fenoterol, salbutamol, and terbutaline in asthma." Lancet 336 (1990): 1396-9
  2. Allon M, Dunlay R, Copkney C "Nebulized albuterol for acute hyperkalemia in patients on hemodialysis." Ann Intern Med 110 (1989): 426-9
  3. "Product Information. Alupent (metaproterenol)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
View all 29 references

Beta-2 Adrenergic Bronchodilators (Includes Ventolin) ↔ Seizures

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Seizures

Adrenergic bronchodilators may cause CNS stimulation. Seizures have been reported rarely in patients treated with terbutaline. Therapy with adrenergic bronchodilators should be administered cautiously in patients with seizure disorders. Systemic adverse effects are minimized, but not abolished, by administration of these agents via oral inhalation.

References

  1. "Product Information. Proventil (albuterol)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Ventolin (albuterol)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  3. "Product Information. Alupent (metaproterenol)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
View all 10 references

You should also know about...

Ventolin (albuterol) drug Interactions

There are 450 drug interactions with Ventolin (albuterol)

Ventolin (albuterol) alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Ventolin (albuterol)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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