Paracetamol (acetaminophen) Disease Interactions

There are 3 disease interactions with Paracetamol (acetaminophen):

Acetaminophen (Includes Paracetamol) ↔ Alcoholism

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Alcoholism

Chronic alcohol abusers may be at increased risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment with acetaminophen (APAP). Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure resulting in liver transplant and death, has been reported in patients using acetaminophen. Therapy with acetaminophen should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients who consume three or more alcoholic drinks a day. In general, patients should avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure. They should also be advised to seek medical attention if they experience signs and symptoms of liver injury such as fever, rash, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, right upper quadrant pain, dark urine, and jaundice.

References

  1. Whitcomb DC, Block GD "Association of acetaminopphen hepatotoxicity with fasting and ethanol use." JAMA 272 (1994): 1845-50
  2. Bonkovsky HL "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, fasting, and ethanol." JAMA 274 (1995): 301
  3. Kaysen GA, Pond SM, Roper MH, Menke DJ, Marrama MA "Combined hepatic and renal injury in alcoholics during therapeutic use of acetaminophen." Arch Intern Med 145 (1985): 2019-23
View all 11 references

Acetaminophen (Includes Paracetamol) ↔ Liver Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Acetaminophen is primarily metabolized in the liver to inactive forms. However, small quantities are converted by minor pathways to metabolites that can cause hepatotoxicity or methemoglobinemia. Patients with hepatic impairment may be at increased risk of toxicity due to increased minor metabolic pathway activity. Likewise, chronic or overuse of acetaminophen can saturate the primary hepatic enzymes and lead to increased metabolism by minor pathways. Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure resulting in liver transplant and death, has been reported in patients using acetaminophen. Therapy with acetaminophen should be administered cautiously in patients with hepatic insufficiency. Clinical monitoring of hepatic function is recommended. Instruct patients to avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure.

References

  1. Gillette JR "An integrated approach to the study of chemically reactive metabolites of acetaminophen." Arch Intern Med 141 (1981): 375-9
  2. "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  3. Clements JA, Critchley JA, Prescott LF "The role of sulphate conjugation in the metabolism and disposition of oral and intravenous paracetamol in man." Br J Clin Pharmacol 18 (1984): 481-5
View all 6 references

Acetaminophen (Includes Paracetamol) ↔ Pku

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Phenylketonuria

Several oral acetaminophen and acetaminophen-combination products, particularly flavored chewable tablets, contain the artificial sweetener, aspartame (NutraSweet). Aspartame is converted to phenylalanine in the gastrointestinal tract following ingestion. Chewable and effervescent formulations of acetaminophen products may also contain phenylalanine. The aspartame/phenylalanine content should be considered when these products are used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonurics).

References

  1. "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.

You should also know about...

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) drug Interactions

There are 157 drug interactions with Paracetamol (acetaminophen)

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Paracetamol (acetaminophen)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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