Medication Guide App

One-Third of Patients Discontinue Common Breast Cancer Therapy

PRINCETON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar 15, 2007 - An alarming study that appeared in the March 1, 2007 issue of CANCER (a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society), reports that one-third of women taking the standard five-year regimen of the hormonal breast cancer treatment tamoxifen citrate, discontinue therapy early.(1)

According to the authors, non-compliance with tamoxifen tablets is a major issue that may negatively affect treatment efficacy. While tamoxifen tablets remain a standard of care, according to these data, they are associated with compliance and persistency issues. Oncologists need to identify those at risk of non-persistence and develop strategies to combat this barrier to treatment success.

Patients at risk of non-persistence include those who prefer alternative delivery formats to traditional pills/tablets, such as liquid formulations. SOLTAMOX, the only liquid form of tamoxifen citrate, is an alternative for women who require tamoxifen therapy. SOLTAMOX may be an attractive option for women who do not like pills or cannot swallow pills. SOLTAMOX is approved by the FDA and is available in the U.S. through Cytogen Corporation. For more information about SOLTAMOX, please visit www.soltamoxus.com. -0-

WHO:   Linda Vahdat, MD, Weill Cornell Medical Center. Dr. Vahdat is a

        leading breast cancer expert and a participant in the

        Compliance Strategic Initiative -- a program designed to

        increase awareness compliance and to raise awareness

        importance of hormonal therapy in breast cancer.


WHAT:  Dr. Vahdat is available to speak with media regarding the

        importance of tamoxifen compliance and the need to offer

        patients more options.


WHEN:  March 2007


WHERE: Please contact Eliza Schleifstein (973) 387-0342 to set up a

        convenient time to interview Dr. Vahdat.

About SOLTAMOX

SOLTAMOX (tamoxifen citrate) is now available in U.S. pharmacies nationwide. SOLTAMOX is the only liquid form of the hormonal breast cancer therapy, tamoxifen, approved by the FDA and available in the U.S. SOLTAMOX is indicated for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, adjuvant treatment of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and reduction in breast cancer incidence in high risk women.

WARNING - For Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) and Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer: Serious and life-threatening events associated with tamoxifen in the risk reduction setting (women at high risk for cancer and women with DCIS) include uterine malignancies, stroke and pulmonary embolism.

Incidence rates for these events were estimated from the NSABP P-1 trial (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies, Reduction in Breast Cancer Incidence In High Risk Women).

Uterine malignancies consist of both endometrial adenocarcinoma (incidence rate per 1,000 women-years of 2.20 for tamoxifen vs. 0.71 for placebo) and uterine sarcoma (incidence rate per 1,000 women years of 0.17 for tamoxifen vs. 0.0 for placebo) *. For stroke, the incidence rate per 1,000 women years was 1.43 for tamoxifen vs. 1.00 for placebo**.

For pulmonary embolism, the incidence rate per 1,000 women years was 0.75 for tamoxifen versus 0.25 for placebo**. Some of the strokes, pulmonary emboli, and uterine malignancies were fatal.

Health care providers should discuss the potential benefits versus the potential risks of these serious events with women at high risk of breast cancer and women with DCIS considering tamoxifen to reduce their risk of developing breast cancer. The benefits of tamoxifen outweigh its risks in women already diagnosed with breast cancer.

Full prescribing information for SOLTAMOX is available on Cytogen's Web site at http://www.cytogen.com.

(1) Barron, Thomas I., Roisin Connolly, Bennett Kathleen, John Feely, and M. John Kennedy. "Early Discontinuation of Tamoxifen." Cancer 109 (2007): 1-9.

Contact

JFK Communications, Inc.
Eliza Schleifstein, 973-387-0342
efschleifstein@aol.com

Posted: March 2007

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