New Treatment for Lung Cancer Shows Promise Non-Invasive, Inhalable Powder Increases Survival Rates

Arlington, Va. — A new inhalable dry powder treatment for lung cancer shows a significant increase in survival rates and is far less invasive than current treatment options, which frequently include radiation and surgery. This research is being presented at the 2010 International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) Pharmaceutical Sciences World Congress (PSWC) in association with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans, La., Nov. 14-18.

Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the U.S., accounting for more deaths than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many people endure more than one type of lung cancer treatment, which can last for weeks to months.

Lead researcher Raimar Löbenberg and his colleagues Warren Finlay and Wilson Roa from the University of Alberta developed an inhalable dry powder using a common chemotherapy drug encapsulated into nanoparticles. Some mice were treated with the inhalable powder and others with the same drug through two different delivery methods, a solution and IV injection of drug bound nanoparticles.

Results showed that the inhalable dry powder was more effective than using the IV or solution. In the study, more than 80 percent of the mice survived for more than 90 days and more than 70 percent survived for 140 days. None of the mice treated with the IV injection or solution survived past 50 days.

“Current lung cancer treatments can be grueling and take a significant toll on the patient,” said Löbenberg. “Our results show that this treatment method may not only increase someone’s survival rate but could also potentially be less toxic to the body.”

The inhalable dry powder was also more effective than the IV injection in reducing the amount and size of tumors. Large tumor masses were seen in the lungs of those animals that were not treated or treated with the IV injection or solution. Animals treated with the inhalable dry powder showed fewer and much smaller tumors.

For the first time, FIP’s PSWC and the AAPS Annual Meeting and Exposition will join to hold the world’s largest pharmaceutical sciences meeting to improve global health through advances in pharmaceutical sciences. An estimated 10,000 scientists from more than 60 countries will participate in 100 sessions, including 40 symposia and roundtables.

Learn more about the meeting and global health from leading scientists in this webisode series and follow the tweet hashtag #PSWC2010 for meeting updates. Editor’s Note: All press must register and provide press credentials to attend this meeting. To register, please contact CatapanoJ@aaps.orgMayS@aaps.org> or 703-248-4772. To schedule an interview with Raimar Löbenberg or any other press inquiry, please contact Hillarie Turner at hbt@ecius.nethbt@ecius.net> or 202-296-2002 x113.

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About AAPS: The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists is a professional, scientific society of approximately 12,000 members employed in academia, industry, government and other research institutes worldwide. For more information, please visit www.aapspharmaceutica.com.

About FIP: The International Pharmaceutical Federation is the global federation of national associations representing two million pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists from around the world. For more information, please visit www.fip.org.

 

Hillarie Turner hbt@ecius.nethbt@ecius.net> 202-296-2002 x113
 

Posted: November 2010

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