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Iomai Announces Data from Phase 2 Field Study of Travelers' Diarrhea Vaccine Accepted for Presentation at ICAAC

GAITHERSBURG, Md., August 23, 2007 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Iomai Corporation today announced that the abstract detailing efficacy and safety results from its double-blind Phase 2 field study of a patch-based vaccine for travelers' diarrhea has been accepted as a "late breaker" presentation at Interscience Conference on Antimicrobials and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), to be held in Chicago Sept. 17 to 20.

The abstract, "Transcutaneous Immunization with the Heat Labile Toxin (LT) of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Protects in a Phase 2 Field Trial in Travelers to Guatemala and Mexico," will be presented by Gregory Glenn, M.D., Iomai's chief scientific officer, on Tuesday, Sept. 18, during the session on "Vaccines and Pediatric Infections." The session will be held from 1:30 to 4 p.m.

About Travelers' Diarrhea

This year, approximately 55 million international travelers will visit countries where bacteria that cause travelers' diarrhea are endemic, particularly Africa, Asia and Latin America, and about 20 million of those travelers will develop travelers' diarrhea.

Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is caused by ingestion of pathogens in contaminated food and water. Of the 54 million travelers to endemic areas, an estimated 17 million will contract TD, making it one of the most common illnesses in travelers. Symptoms last for 3 to 5 days, and 55 percent of subjects who become ill have more than six stools daily, with an average of 18 total stools per episode. TD is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting and cramping and can result in severe dehydration, mimicking the symptoms of cholera. Although generally self-limited, TD is often accompanied by prostration and can require hospitalization, often in settings where health care is inadequate. Additionally, 10 to 30 percent of travelers who contract diarrhea also develop a more chronic condition, irritable bowel syndrome.

About Iomai Corporation

Iomai Corporation discovers and develops vaccines and immune system stimulants, delivered via a novel, needle-free technology called transcutaneous immunization (TCI). TCI taps into the unique benefits of a major group of antigen-presenting cells found in the outer layers of the skin (Langerhans cells) to generate an enhanced immune response. Iomai is leveraging TCI to enhance the efficacy of existing vaccines, develop new vaccines that are viable only through transcutaneous administration and expand the global vaccine market. Iomai currently has four product candidates in development: three targeting influenza and pandemic flu and one to prevent travelers' diarrhea.

Posted: August 2007

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