Interleukin Genetics to Present New Findings at the 11th Cardiovascular Genomics and Atherosclerosis Symposium

 

 

WALTHAM, Mass., October 30, 2008 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/Interleukin Genetics, Inc. , announced today that Kenneth Kornman, Ph.D., the company's Chief Scientific Officer, will present new research findings on the genetics of cardiovascular disease at the , which takes place from Oct. 31 - Nov. 1, 2008, at the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea. Dr. Kornman will present at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 31.

 

Dr. Kornman will present "Inflammation genetics and cardiovascular disease," highlighting new findings on genetic differences between Caucasian and Asian populations relative to inflammatory response and cardiovascular disease.

 

Dr. Kornman commented, "The new genetic findings are based on a study of the genetics of early heart disease conducted in Seoul, South Korea. Genetic patterns were identified that appear to increase inflammatory responses and increase the risk for an early heart attack in Koreans. This information should be valuable in guiding the medical management of high-risk patients."

 

The new genetic findings are the result of research collaborations with Dr. Yangsoo Jang, Cardiovascular Genome Center and Cardiology Division at and Dr. Jong Ho Lee, Yonsei University Research Institute of Science for Aging. The study evaluated genetic variations involved in inflammatory responses in individuals who had a heart attack or blocked coronary arteries prior to age 56.

 

In addition, the study identified an IL-1 genetic pattern that appears to protect against early onset heart disease in approximately seven percent of Koreans. This genetic variation was associated with favorable health parameters, including low body mass index, high HDL cholesterol, and low triglycerides. Individuals with this genetic pattern were at very low risk for early onset heart disease or heart attack.

 

 

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an inflammatory disease in which plaque builds up inside the coronary arteries. These arteries supply your heart muscle with oxygen-rich blood. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, and other substances found in the blood. When plaque builds up in the arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis. Variation in interleukin genes has shown to be associated with different degrees of CAD risk.

 

 

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes heart, stroke and blood vessel disease, is the world's leading killer, accounting for nearly 30 percent, or about 17 million, of total deaths in 2003. While deaths from heart attacks have declined more than 50 percent in many industrialized countries since the 1960's, death rates from CAD are on the rise. Urban China saw an increase greater than 50 percent from 1988 to 1996. In total, 80 percent of global CVD-related deaths occur in low and middle-income nations, including most countries in Asia.

 

A recent World Health Organization report identifies the increasing importance of cardiovascular disease in developing countries. A study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology (2003; 32:563-572) concluded that in both Asian and non-Asian populations in the Asia-Pacific region, total cholesterol is strongly associated with both the risk of coronary artery disease and ischemia. Rising population-wide levels of cholesterol would be expected to contribute to a substantial increase in the overall burden of cardiovascular disease in this region. If the pattern is similar to incidence rates seen in the United States, it is estimated that East Asian countries could have a significant number of individuals at risk as their populations modernize, adopt a western-based diet and individuals' cholesterol levels rise. This estimate translates to severe heart disease in as many as 105 million individuals in China, over 10 million individuals in Japan and nearly 4 million individuals in Korea.

 

 

The genetic patterns of adults who had cardiovascular disease events prior to age 56 were compared to adults with no history or evidence of early cardiovascular disease. The populations were recruited by the Cardiology Division at , and the cases were confirmed to have either a myocardial infarction or coronary artery disease, as assessed by angiography.

 

Genetic variations were identified that are associated with increased risk of early cardiovascular events. These same gene variations were found to have higher levels of C-reactive protein.

 

 

Interleukin Genetics, Inc. , is a genetics-focused personalized health company that develops preventive consumer products and genetic tests for sale to the emerging personalized health market. Focused on the future of health and medicine, Interleukin Genetics uses its leading genetics research and scientific capabilities to develop and test innovative preventive and therapeutic products. Interleukin Genetics is headquartered in Waltham, MA. For more information about Interleukin Genetics, its products and ongoing programs, please visit http://www.ilgenetics.com.

 

 

CONTACT: Media: Lisa Rivero, LaVoie Group, +1-978-745-4200 x106,, Investor Relations: Melanie Friedman, SternInvestor Relations, +1-212-362-1200, lrivero@lavoiegroup.com melanie@sternir.com

Web site: http://www.ilgenetics.com/

Ticker Symbol: (AMEX:ILI)

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Posted: October 2008

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