Blood Pressure Medicines Reduce Stroke Risk in People With Prehypertension

Study Highlights:

-- Blood pressure medicines reduced the risk of stroke by 22 percent in people with prehypertension.

-- More than 50 million Americans have an increased risk of stroke due to prehypertension.

DALLAS, Dec. 8, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- People with prehypertension had a lower risk of stroke when they took blood pressure-lowering medicines, according to research reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Prehypertension, which affects more than 50 million adults in the United States, is blood pressure ranging between 120/80 mm Hg and

139/89 mm Hg. Hypertension is 140/90 mm Hg or higher.

"Our study pertains to people with pre-hypertensive blood pressure levels and shows that the excess risk of stroke associated with these high-normal readings (top number 120-140) can be altered by taking blood pressure pills," said Ilke Sipahi, M.D., lead author of the study and associate director of Heart Failure and Transplantation at the Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute in Cleveland, Ohio.

In a meta-analysis of 16 studies, researchers examined data that compared anti-hypertensive drugs against placebo in 70,664 people with average baseline blood pressure levels within the pre-hypertensive range. The researchers found:

-- Patients taking blood pressure-lowering medicines had a 22 percent lower

risk of stroke compared to those taking a placebo. This effect was

observed across all classes of anti-hypertensive drugs studied.

-- No significant reduction in the risk of heart attack occurred, but there

was a trend toward lower cardiovascular death in patients taking blood

pressure medications compared to those on placebo.

-- To prevent one stroke in the study population, 169 people had to be

treated with a blood pressure-lowering medication for an average 4.3

years.

American Heart Association treatment guidelines call for lifestyle changes, not medications, to reduce blood pressure in people with prehypertension. Those lifestyle changes include weight loss, physical activity, a diet rich in fruit and vegetables and low in salt and fat, and keeping alcohol consumption moderate (no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women).

"We do not think that giving blood pressure medicine instead of implementing the lifestyle changes is the way to go," Sipahi said.

"However, the clear-cut reduction in the risk of stroke with blood pressure pills is important and may be complementary to lifestyle changes."

The cost of long-term therapy and the risks associated with blood pressure medicines need to be discussed extensively within the medical community before undertaking guideline changes, Sipahi said.

Co-authors are: Aparna Swaminathan, fourth-year medical student; Viswanath Natesan, M.D.; Sara M. Debanne, Ph.D.; Daniel I. Simon, M.D.; and James C. Fang, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position.

The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

NR11 -- 1183 (Stroke/Sipahi)

Additional resources available in the right column of this link:

http://newsroom.heart.org/pr/aha/_prv-blood-pressure-medicines-reduce-2

20122.aspx

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For journal copies only, please call: (214) 706-1396 For other information, contact:

Maggie Francis: (214) 706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org Karen Astle: (214) 706-1392; karen.astle@heart.org Julie Del Barto (broadcast): (214) 706-1330; julie.delbarto@heart.org For public inquires: 1 (800) AHA-USA1

Posted: December 2011

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