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Scarlet Fever

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

Scarlet fever is an infection caused by bacteria. This bacteria makes a toxin (poison) that can cause a red rash on the skin. Scarlet fever is most common in children between 5 and 15 years of age.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Antibiotics: This medicine is given to fight an infection caused by bacteria. Give your child this medicine exactly as ordered by his healthcare provider. Do not stop giving your child the antibiotics unless directed by his healthcare provider. Never save antibiotics or give your child leftover antibiotics that were given to him for another illness.

  • Ibuprofen or acetaminophen: These medicines are given to decrease your child's pain and fever. They can be bought without a doctor's order. Ask how much medicine is safe to give your child, and how often to give it.

  • Do not give aspirin to children under 18 years of age: Your child could develop Reye syndrome if he takes aspirin. Reye syndrome can cause life-threatening brain and liver damage. Check your child's medicine labels for aspirin, salicylates, or oil of wintergreen.

  • Give your child's medicine as directed: Call your child's healthcare provider if you think the medicine is not helping or if he has side effects. Tell your child's healthcare provider if your child takes any vitamins, herbs, or other medicines. Keep a list of the medicines he takes. Include the amounts, and when and why he takes them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits.

Follow up with your child's healthcare provider as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your child's visits.

Manage your child's symptoms:

  • Give your child warm liquids, such as soup, or cold foods, like popsicles or milkshakes. This may help ease the pain of the sore throat.

  • Run a cool mist humidifier. This will help increase air moisture in your child's room. Follow the humidifier instructions carefully for running and cleaning it. Direct the mist stream towards your child's face, but keep the humidifier out of your child's reach.

  • Your child may need more rest than he realizes while he heals. Quiet play will keep your child safely busy so he does not become restless and risk injuring himself. Have your child read or draw quietly. Follow instructions for how much rest your child should get while he heals.

Return to school:

Your child may return to school 24 hours after he begins antibiotic medicine and when his fever has been gone for a day.

Prevent scarlet fever:

  • Keep your child away from people with strep throat.

  • Wash your child's hands often with soap and water.

  • Do not allow your child to share eating or drinking utensils.

Contact your child's primary healthcare provider if:

  • Your child has a fever.

  • Your child is tugging at his ears or has ear pain.

  • You have questions or concerns about your child's condition or care.

Return to the emergency department if:

  • It becomes difficult for your child to eat, drink, or breathe.

  • Your child cries without tears.

  • Your child has a dry mouth or cracked lips.

  • Your child is more sleepy or irritable than usual.

  • Your child has a sunken soft spot on the top of his head.

  • Your child urinates less than usual or not at all.

  • Your child says he feels dizzy.

© 2014 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Learn more about Scarlet Fever (Aftercare Instructions)

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