Partial Nail Avulsion For Ingrown Nail

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

A partial nail avulsion is a procedure to remove part of an ingrown nail. An ingrown nail is when the edge of your fingernail or toenail grows into the skin next to it.


CARE AGREEMENT:

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment.

RISKS:

After your procedure, you may have bleeding, pain, or get an infection. Your ingrown nail may happen again. You may need to have the procedure done again. You may have damage to surrounding tissue. Your nail may look disfigured, or you may have a scar. Without treatment, you may have increased pain, swelling, and infection.

WHILE YOU ARE HERE:

Informed consent

is a legal document that explains the tests, treatments, or procedures that you may need. Informed consent means you understand what will be done and can make decisions about what you want. You give your permission when you sign the consent form. You can have someone sign this form for you if you are not able to sign it. You have the right to understand your medical care in words you know. Before you sign the consent form, understand the risks and benefits of what will be done. Make sure all your questions are answered.

Before your procedure:

Your caregiver will give you numbing medicine by giving you shots near the nail. A tourniquet will be wrapped around your finger or toe to decrease bleeding during your procedure.

During your procedure:

  • Your caregiver will cut from the top of the nail down to the bottom of the nail. He will use a tool to remove the nail from your finger or toe. At this time, he may also do a matricectomy.

  • During a matricectomy, the caregiver destroys part of your nail matrix so that a small section of your nail stops growing. Your nail matrix is the area that your nail grows from. It is the pale or white color at the base of your nail. Most of the matrix cannot be seen because it lies underneath the skin. A chemical, laser, or instrument may be used to destroy the nail matrix.

After your procedure:

Your caregiver may put antibiotic ointment and a bandage on your finger or toe. He may want to look at your finger or toe again within 24 hours after your procedure.

© 2014 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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