Medication Guide App

Open Salpingo-oophorectomy

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

  • Open salpingo-oophorectomy (sal-ping-go-of-o-REK-tah-me) is surgery to remove one or both fallopian tubes together with the ovaries. The fallopian tubes are attached on one end to your uterus (womb) and to the ovaries on the other. The ovaries are a pair of organs in the lower abdomen (stomach) that make eggs and female hormones. When one of your ovaries releases an egg, the egg passes through the tube to your uterus. The female hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, are special chemicals which help the body work correctly. A salpingo-oophorectomy is done to remove cysts, tumors, adhesions, or blockages, and treat infections in the tubes and ovaries. It is also done to treat pregnancies where the fertilized egg grows outside the womb. It may be needed to stop the ovaries from making hormones that increase your risk for having breast and ovarian cancer.



  • With an open salpingo-oophorectomy, your caregiver will do the surgery by making an incision (cut) in your abdomen. Your caregiver may take out one or both sets of your tubes and ovaries. Your caregiver may only remove a tube and an ovary on one side. You may still be able to get pregnant after this surgery. In some cases, both sets of tubes and ovaries are removed. This will make you infertile and unable to become pregnant. With an open salpingo-oophorectomy, problems in your reproductive system may be treated and the symptoms they cause relieved

INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Keep a current list of your medicines: Include the amounts, and when, how, and why you take them. Take the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency. Throw away old medicine lists. Use vitamins, herbs, or food supplements only as directed.

  • Take your medicine as directed: Call your primary healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not working as expected. Tell him about any medicine allergies, and if you want to quit taking or change your medicine.

Ask for information about where and when to go for follow-up visits:

For continuing care, treatments, or home services, ask for more information.

Bathing with stitches:

Follow your primary healthcare provider's instructions on when you can bathe. Gently wash the part of your body that has the stitches. Do not rub on the stitches to dry your skin. Pat the area gently with a towel. When the area is dry, put on a clean, new bandage as directed.

Counseling:

Having your fallopian tubes and ovaries removed may be life-changing for you and your family. Accepting your present condition may be hard. Sudden changes in the levels of your hormones may occur and cause mood swings and depression. You may feel angry, sad, or frightened, or cry frequently and unexpectedly. These feelings are normal. Talk to your caregivers, family, or friends about your feelings. You may need to attend meetings or talks together with your caregiver and family members. Your friends or other people who are close to you may also be asked to attend these meetings. These meetings can help everyone understand your condition, surgery, or care better.

Lifestyle changes:

  • Diet and drinking liquids:

    • Eat a variety of healthy foods from all the food groups. The food groups include breads, vegetables, fruits, milk and milk products, and protein (beans, eggs, poultry, meat and fish). These foods may help you feel better and have more energy. You may need to add special drinks or vitamins to your diet. You may be told to limit the amount of salt you eat. Ask your caregiver how many servings of fats, oils, and sweets you may have each day, and if you need to be on a special diet.

    • Follow your caregiver's advice if you must change the amount of liquid you drink. For most people, good liquids to drink are water, juices, and milk. Try to drink enough liquid each day, and not just when you feel thirsty.

  • Exercise: Exercise makes the heart stronger, lowers blood pressure, and helps keep you healthy. Begin to exercise slowly and do more as you get stronger. Talk with your primary healthcare provider before you start an exercise program.

  • Keep a healthy weight: Weighing too much can make your heart work harder and can cause serious health problems. Talk to your caregiver about a weight loss plan if you are overweight.

CONTACT A CAREGIVER IF:

  • You have a fever.

  • You have chills, a cough, or feel weak and achy.

  • You have nausea (upset stomach) or vomiting (throwing up).

  • Your skin is itchy, swollen, or has a rash.

  • You have chest pain or trouble breathing that is getting worse over time.

  • You have questions or concerns about your surgery, condition, or care.

SEEK CARE IMMEDIATELY IF:

  • You feel something is bulging out into your vagina or you have vaginal bleeding.

  • You have lower abdominal or back pain that does not go away even after taking your medicines

  • You have pus or a foul-smelling odor coming from your vagina.

  • You have trouble passing urine or moving your bowel.

  • You have sudden, severe shoulder pain.

  • Your bandage becomes soaked with blood.

  • You suddenly feel lightheaded and have trouble breathing.

  • You have new and sudden chest pain. You may have more pain when you take deep breaths or cough. You may cough up blood.

  • Your leg feels warm, tender, and painful. It may look swollen and red.

  • Your symptoms come back.

© 2013 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of the Blausen Databases or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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