Myomectomy

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

  • Myomectomy surgery removes one or more myomas from your uterus (womb). Myomas are also called fibroid tumors (growths of tissue and muscle) or leiomyomas. A woman's uterus is the organ where a fetus (unborn baby) grows during pregnancy. Myomas may cause more bleeding than usual during or between your monthly periods. Your periods also may last longer if you have myomas. If you bleed too much, you may get anemia (a condition where your blood does not have enough iron). Myomas can cause pain and pressure in your lower abdomen, and you may need to urinate more often. Myomas may make it harder to get pregnant or may cause problems during pregnancy. Myomas are usually benign, which means they do not have cancer in them.
    Picture of the anatomy of the reproductive system of a female


  • Myomas are removed using open or laparoscopic surgery. During an open myomectomy, your caregiver will make an incision (cut) into your abdomen to remove your myomas. If you are having laparoscopic surgery, your caregiver will remove the myomas through smaller cuts in your abdomen. After a myomectomy, you may bleed less during or between your periods. You may have less pain in your abdomen. It may be easier for you to get pregnant and to carry your baby full-term.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Take your medicine as directed.

Call your primary healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

  • Antibiotics: This medicine is given to fight or prevent an infection caused by bacteria. Always take your antibiotics exactly as ordered by your primary healthcare provider. Do not stop taking your medicine unless directed by your primary healthcare provider. Never save antibiotics or take leftover antibiotics that were given to you for another illness.

  • Anti-hormone medicine: Your caregiver may give you medicine to help decrease certain hormones in your blood. Hormones are chemicals that may create new myomas.

  • Iron: Your caregiver may give you iron pills if you have anemia.

  • Pain medicine: You may need medicine to take away or decrease pain.

    • Learn how to take your medicine. Ask what medicine and how much you should take. Be sure you know how, when, and how often to take it.

    • Do not wait until the pain is severe before you take your medicine. Tell caregivers if your pain does not decrease.

    • Pain medicine can make you dizzy or sleepy. Prevent falls by calling someone when you get out of bed or if you need help.

Ask for information about where and when to go for follow-up visits:

For continuing care, treatments, or home services, ask for more information.

  • Your caregiver will check for new myomas by doing a pelvic exam. You may have an ultrasound to check for new myomas. Ask your caregiver for more information about the tests you may need.

Wound care:

Ask your caregiver how to take care of your wound.

Activity:

Ask your caregiver if you should avoid any activities after surgery.

CONTACT A CAREGIVER IF:

  • You start to bleed more than usual during or between your monthly periods, after your myomas are removed.

  • You are constipated (have hard, dry stools).

  • You still cannot get pregnant, even after your myomas have been removed.

  • You feel new pressure in your abdomen.

  • You have a fever.

  • You have nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) or vomiting (throwing up).

  • You have new pain in your abdomen, or your pain is getting worse.

  • You have chest pain or trouble breathing that is getting worse over time.

  • Your wound is swollen, red, or has pus coming from it.

SEEK CARE IMMEDIATELY IF:

  • You cannot have a bowel movement (BM).

  • You cannot urinate or urinate very little.

  • You have bleeding from your vagina that does not stop.

  • You have new and sudden chest pain. You may have more pain when you take deep breaths or cough. You may cough up blood.

  • You suddenly feel lightheaded and have trouble breathing.

  • You suddenly have severe (very bad) abdominal pain.

  • Your arm or leg feels warm, tender, and painful. It may look swollen and red.

  • Your stitches come apart.

  • Call 911 or an ambulance if you have any signs of a heart attack:

    • Discomfort in the center of your chest that feels like squeezing, pressure, fullness, or pain, that lasts for more than a few minutes or keeps returning

    • Discomfort or pain in your back, neck, jaw, stomach, or one or both of your arms

    • Feeling sick to your stomach

    • Having trouble breathing

    • A sudden cold sweat, particularly in combination with chest discomfort or trouble breathing

    • Feeling very lightheaded or dizzy, particularly in combination with chest discomfort or trouble breathing

© 2013 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of the Blausen Databases or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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