Low Concentrated Sweets Diet

What is it?

Low Concentrated Sweets Diet Care Guide

A Low Concentrated Sweets Diet means avoiding foods with a lot of sugar or high calorie sweeteners. Sweeteners become blood sugar (glucose) in your body. If you eat too many of these foods your blood sugar can be too high.

  • You may need this diet if you have diabetes or if your blood sugar has been higher than usual.

  • Some people can control their blood sugar levels by staying on this type of diet. Others need to exercise, eat fewer calories, lose weight, or take medicine for high blood sugar.

Care:

Eat a well-rounded diet as listed under the Balanced Diet Plan below. Ask your dietitian how many servings to eat from each group. Limit the foods on the list below under Concentrated Sweets to Limit.

  • Read labels of all prepared foods that you buy. Ask your caregiver or dietitian about portion sizes before eating any foods you are unsure of.

  • The ingredients of foods are listed on labels in the order of their amount from the most to the least. Some foods have sugar or sweeteners listed after the 4th or 5th ingredient on the label. These foods are often allowed because the amount of sugar is small.

  • Staying active and getting plenty of exercise also helps control your blood sugar. Check with your caregiver before you starting an exercise program. You may need to adjust your diet on days that you exercise.

  • Get regular check-ups with your caregiver. If you have diabetes, you should check your blood sugar levels regularly. Talk with your caregiver about how often you should check your blood sugars. Talk with your caregiver if your blood sugar levels are too low or too high. Make sure your cholesterol and other blood lipids (fats) are checked at least once a year. You may need to follow a low fat diet if they are too high.

  • You should also eat non-sweetened foods with your meals, if you eat food or drink liquids that contain sugar. Check with your dietitian or caregiver before eating the following foods.

    • foods with added sugar

    • corn syrup

    • honey, molasses

    • maple syrup

    • jams and jellies.

Serving Sizes:

Use the list below to measure foods and serving sizes. A serving size means the size of food after it is cooked or prepared.

  • 1 pint or 2 cups (16 fluid ounces) of liquid is the size of 1-1/3 soda-pop cans.

  • 1-1/2 cup (12 fluid ounces) of liquid is the size of a soda-pop can.

  • 1 cup of food is the size of a large handful, or 8 fluid ounces of liquid.

  • 1/2 cup of food is about half of a large handful, or 4 fluid ounces of liquid.

  • 2 tablespoons (Tbsp) is about the size of a large walnut.

  • 1 tablespoon (Tbsp) is about the size of the tip of your thumb (from the last crease).

  • 1 teaspoon (tsp) is about the size of the tip of your little finger (from the last crease).

  • 3 ounces of cooked meat, fish, or poultry is about the size of a deck of cards.

  • 1 ounce of cooked meat, fish, or poultry is about 1/4 cup (c).

  • One ounce of hard cheese is about a 1 inch cube.

  • A serving of vegetables is 1/2 cup (1/2 handful) cooked, or 1 cup (1 handful) raw.

BALANCED DIET PLAN

Breads and Starches:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 6-11 servings per day.

  • 1 slice bread (1 ounce)

  • 1/2 cup cooked pasta, corn, cooked cereal, mashed potato, or green peas

  • 1/3 cup cooked rice, dried beans, or dried peas

  • 3/4 cup flake cereal

  • 1/2 hamburger or hot dog bun, English muffin, or frozen bagel

  • 3 cups air-popped popcorn

  • 1 small (3 inch) potato

  • 2 rice cakes

  • 6 saltines or three (2-1/2 inch squares) graham crackers

Fruits:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 3-5 servings per day.

  • 1/2 cup apple, orange, or grapefruit juice

  • 1 small (2-1/2 inch) apple, peach, or orange

  • 1/2 cup applesauce or canned fruit

  • 3/4 cup fresh blueberries

  • 1/3 cup cranberry juice cocktail, grape juice, or prune juice

  • 15 small grapes or 12 large grapes

  • 1 kiwi fruit

  • 1/2 large pear or fresh grapefruit

  • 2 Tbsp raisins or 1/4 cup dried fruit

  • 1-1/4 cup fresh strawberries or melon cubes

Dairy:

Eat or drink ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 2-4 servings per day.

  • 1/2 cup sugar free custard, pudding, or evaporated milk

  • 1 cup fresh milk or sugar-free yogurt

  • 1/3 cup nonfat milk powder

Vegetables:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 3-5 servings.

  • 2 Tbsp tomato sauce

  • 1 cup vegetable or tomato juice

  • 1/2 cup cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables

Meat / Meat Substitutes:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 2-3 servings per day.

  • 1/2 cup cottage cheese

  • 1/2 cup cooked dried beans

  • 1 to 2 oz lowfat cheese

  • 1 large egg (Limit eggs to 2 or 3 per week.)

  • 2 to 3 oz cooked meat, fish, poultry

  • 2 Tbsp peanut butter

Fats:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 1-3 servings per day.

  • 6 almonds or 10 small peanuts

  • 1/8 avocado

  • 1 teaspoon oil or margarine

  • 6 small olives

  • 2 Tbsp low calorie salad dressing

  • 1Tbsp regular salad dressing

Combination Foods:

Eat ____ servings per day from this list. Most people need 1-3 servings.

  • 1/2 cup of any casserole, like tuna or chicken noodle, macaroni and cheese, chili with meat, or spaghetti and meat sauce

  • 1 cup cream, bean, tomato, or vegetable soup

  • 1/8 of a 10-inch pizza

  • 1/2 of a store-bought pot pie, like chicken, turkey, or beef

  • One 3 ounce taco

Concentrated Sweets to limit:

Eat only ____ servings per week, in the amount suggested by your dietitian.

  • Cakes, candy, cookies

  • Chocolate milk

  • Fruit canned in syrup

  • Fruit drinks with added sugar or corn syrup

  • Granola and granola bars

  • Honey and molasses

  • Ice cream and sherbet

  • Jelly, jam, and preserves

  • Milkshakes and malts

  • Pancake or maple syrup

  • Pastries, donuts, pies, and sweet rolls

  • Regular pudding and custard

  • Regular soda pop

  • Sugar coated cereals

Food Ingredients to limit:

Eat only small amounts of foods with these ingredients, in the amount suggested by your dietitian.

  • Brown, granulated, or powdered sugar

  • Corn sugar or corn syrup

  • Dextrin, dextrose, and maltose

  • Fructose, glucose, and sucrose

  • High fructose corn syrup

Foods To Try Instead Of Eating Sweets:

Count the foods below as part of the meal plan from your dietitian. The food groups for each food are in parentheses. You can have up to three servings of free foods per day.

  • 1/2 cup cooked cereal (1 starch)

  • 3/4 cup plain or low sugar cereal (1 starch)

  • 12 ounces diet or sugar-free drink from a mix (free food)

  • 1/4 cup dried fruit (1 fruit)

  • 1/2 English muffin or small bagel (1 starch)

  • 1 medium piece of fresh fruit (1 fruit)

  • 1/2 cup fruit canned in water (1 fruit)

  • 3 cups air-popped or lowfat microwave popcorn (1 starch)

  • 1 ounce pretzels (1 starch)

  • 2 rice cakes (1 starch)

  • 3/4 cup sugar free gelatin dessert (free food)

  • 1/2 cup sugar free pudding or custard (1/2 milk)

  • 12 ounces sugar free soda pop (free food)

  • 2 cups tossed salad with 1 Tbsp regular salad dressing (free food and 1 fat)

  • 1 cup vegetable or tomato juice (1 vegetable)

  • 1 cup raw vegetables with 1 Tbsp regular salad dressing (1 vegetable and 1 fat)

  • 1 cup sugar free fat free yogurt (1 milk)

CALL YOUR CAREGIVER IF:

  • You have questions about the serving sizes in this diabetic diet.

  • You have questions about how to prepare or cook foods on this diet.

  • You have questions about how or where to buy foods on this diet.

  • You have questions or concerns about your illness, medicine, or this diet.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. To help with this plan, you must learn about your diet. You can then discuss treatment options with your caregivers. Work with them to decide what care may be used to treat you. You always have the right to refuse treatment.

Copyright © 2008 Thomson Healthcare Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Hide
(web2)