Jock Itch

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

Jock Itch (Aftercare Instructions) Care Guide

Jock itch is a rash on your groin. The groin is the area between your abdomen and legs. Jock itch is usually easy to treat and prevent. It is caused by a fungus. The fungus also causes athlete's foot.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Fungus medicine: Jock itch is usually treated with a cream that kills the fungus. Apply the cream to the rash and the skin around it as directed. You may need to apply the cream 1 to 2 times each day for 2 weeks. You may be given this medicine as a pill if the cream does not help.

  • Take your medicine as directed. Call your primary healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Manage and prevent jock itch:

  • Keep the area dry.

  • Wear light, loose clothes. Do not share clothes.

  • Do not wear wet clothes for long periods. Wash athletic gear after you play sports.

  • Bathe daily. Dry your skin completely after you bathe. Apply cream or powder after you bathe as directed if you get jock itch often. Wash your hands often to prevent the spread of the fungus. You may want to wear disposable gloves when you clean your feet. The gloves will keep the fungus from moving from your feet to your hands.

  • Use separate towels to dry each part of your body. Put your socks on before you put on your underwear so you do not spread the fungus from your feet to your groin.

  • Lose weight if you weigh more than your primary healthcare provider suggests.

Follow up with your primary healthcare provider or skin specialist as directed:

Your primary healthcare provider will examine your rash to see how well it is healing. If you take medicine as a pill, he may draw blood to check how your liver and kidneys are working. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Contact your primary healthcare provider or skin specialist if:

  • Your signs and symptoms do not get better within 2 weeks of treatment.

  • Your signs and symptoms get worse or come back after treatment.

  • You get a rash on a part of your body other than your groin.

  • You have a fever.

  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

© 2013 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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