Corrosive Esophagitis

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

Corrosive esophagitis is a condition where your esophagus is damaged by harmful substances. The damage may cause inflammation, ulcers, or scarring.

AFTER YOU LEAVE:

Medicines:

  • Antibiotics: Antibiotics help treat or prevent an infection in your esophagus.

  • Steroids: These help decrease inflammation.

  • Stomach acid medicine: These help decrease irritation from stomach acids.

  • Antiulcer medicine: These help decrease irritation from stomach acids. They may help increase the protective lining of the esophagus to help it heal.

  • Take your medicine as directed. Call your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your primary healthcare provider or gastroenterologist as directed:

You may need to have another endoscopy to make sure your esophagus is healing. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Nutrition to help your esophagus heal:

You may need to eat foods that are soft and easy to swallow. Some examples are applesauce, bananas, cooked cereal, cottage cheese, eggs, and yogurt.

Prevent corrosive esophagitis:

  • Sit or stand when you take your medicine: Do not lie down after you take your pills. Stay in an upright position for 10 to 15 minutes after you take your pills.

  • Store harmful chemicals in a safe location: Label bottles with harmful substances, and keep them out of the reach of children.

  • Ask for other ways to take your medicine: If you have a narrow esophagus, ask if you can take your medicine in liquid form. Ask if you can crush the pill and mix it with liquid to drink. If you must swallow pills, take them 1 at a time. Take each one with at least 4 ounces of liquid.

Contact your primary healthcare provider or gastroenterologist if:

  • You have a fever.

  • You have pain that does not decrease or go away after you take your pain medicine.

  • You vomit and cannot keep food or liquids down.

  • Your stomach feels very full, and you cannot burp or vomit.

  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Seek care immediately or call 911 if:

  • You feel like food or medicine is stuck in your esophagus and it does not go down when you drink water.

  • Your vomit has blood in it or looks like coffee grounds.

  • You have sudden chest pain and shortness of breath.

  • You have black or bloody bowel movements.

  • Your symptoms are getting worse.

© 2014 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Learn more about Corrosive Esophagitis (Discharge Care)

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