Pregabalin use while Breastfeeding

Drugs containing Pregabalin: Lyrica

Pregabalin Levels and Effects while Breastfeeding

Summary of Use during Lactation

Very limited data indicate that amounts of pregabalin in breastmilk are low. If pregabalin is required by the mother of an older infant, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding, but until more data become available, an alternate drug may be preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant.

Drug Levels

Maternal Levels. In one woman, the breastmilk pregabalin level was about equal to the maternal serum concentration.[1]

Infant Levels. The breastfed infant of a woman who was taking pregabalin (dose not specified) as an anticonvulsant during pregnancy and breastfeeding had a pregabalin serum concentration of 429 mcg/L at 48 hours postpartum, which was about 8% of the mother's serum concentration. Some of the infant's serum concentration could have been derived from transplacental passage, because the pregabalin half-life in this and another newborn averaged 17 hours.[1]

Effects in Breastfed Infants

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects on Lactation and Breastmilk

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

1. Ohman I, De Flon P, Tomson T. Pregabalin kinetics in the neonatal period, and during lactation. Epilepsia. 2011;52 (Suppl 6):249-50. Abstract p824. DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03207.x

Pregabalin Identification

Substance Name

Pregabalin

CAS Registry Number

148553-50-8

Drug Class

Analgesics

Anticonvulsants

Administrative Information

LactMed Record Number

908

Last Revision Date

20130907

Disclaimer

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