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Antidepressant, Painkiller Combo May Raise Risk of Brain Bleed

Posted 14 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 – Taking both an antidepressant and a painkiller such as ibuprofen or naproxen may increase risk of a brain hemorrhage, a new study suggests. Korean researchers found that of more than 4 million people prescribed a first-time antidepressant, those who also used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had a higher risk of intracranial hemorrhage within the next month. Intracranial hemorrhage refers to bleeding under the skull that can lead to permanent brain damage or death. The findings, published online July 14 in BMJ, add to a week of bad news on NSAIDs, which include over-the-counter pain relievers such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Aleve). Last Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration strengthened the warning labels on some NSAIDs, emphasizing that the drugs can raise the risk of heart attack and stroke. As far as the new ... Read more

Related support groups: Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Bleeding Disorder, Celexa, Paxil, Trazodone, Citalopram, Pristiq, Ibuprofen, Sertraline, Viibryd, Amitriptyline, Naproxen, Bupropion, Effexor XR, Fluoxetine

Experts Urge Caution With Popular Painkillers After FDA Warning

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 – People who regularly reach for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen may need to think carefully before they pop those pills, heart experts say. Mounting evidence has shown that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can raise a person's risk of heart attack and stroke. The evidence is strong enough that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday ordered drug makers to toughen warning labels on both prescription and over-the-counter NSAIDs. The tougher warning does not include aspirin, an NSAID that has been shown to lower heart risks in some patients. Most people who occasionally take ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) for infrequent headaches or pain don't have to worry, as long as they follow the dosage directions on the bottle, said Dr. Richard Chazal, president-elect of the American College of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Vicoprofen, Flector, Ketorolac, Flector Patch

FDA Strengthens Heart Attack, Stroke Warning for Popular Painkillers

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 – The U.S Food and Drug Administration on Thursday strengthened the warning labels for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen, saying they can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. The FDA is asking people to think carefully about their use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly if they've already had a heart attack, according to a consumer update on the agency's website. The agency said it is taking this action based on recent data that shows the risk of heart attack or stroke can increase even after using NSAIDs for a short time. "They used to say they might cause risk of heart attack or stroke. Now we are saying they do cause increased risk of heart attack and stroke," FDA spokesman Eric Pahon told NBC News. In particular, people should avoid taking multiple products that contain NSAIDs, according to the revised FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Vicoprofen, Flector, Ketorolac, Flector Patch, Arthrotec

FDA Medwatch Alert: Non-aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Drug Safety Communication - FDA Strengthens Warning of Increased Chance of Heart Attack or Stroke

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

[Posted 07/09/2015] ISSUE:  FDA is strengthening an existing label warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Based on FDAs comprehensive review of new safety information, FDA is requiring updates to the drug labels of all prescription NSAIDs. As is the case with current prescription NSAID labels, the Drug Facts labels of over-the-counter (OTC) non-aspirin NSAIDs already contain information on heart attack and stroke risk. FDA will also request updates to the OTC non-aspirin NSAID Drug Facts labels. See the FDA Drug Safety Communication (Table 1) for a list of non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug products. Prescription NSAID labels will be revised to reflect the following information: The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Vicoprofen, Flector, Flector Patch, Ketorolac, Arthrotec

Insomniacs May Be More Sensitive to Pain

Posted 12 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – People with insomnia or poor sleep quality may be less tolerant of pain, new research suggests. The more frequent and severe the insomnia, the greater the sensitivity to pain, the Norwegian study showed. Additionally, the researchers noted that people with insomnia who also suffer from chronic pain have an even lower threshold for physical discomfort. It's important to note, however, that while the study found an association between a lack of quality sleep and increased pain sensitivity, it wasn't designed to show a cause-and-effect relationship. The study, led by Borge Sivertsen, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Bergen, involved more than 10,000 adults. The study participants all underwent a standard test of pain sensitivity by dunking their hands in a bath of cold water for 106 seconds. The volunteers were also asked about their sleep quality. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Headache, Back Pain, Sleep Disorders, Tramadol, Insomnia, Oxycodone, Methadone, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Chronic Pain, Morphine, Norco, Fentanyl, Tylenol, Lortab, Codeine

Spinal Stimulation System Relieves Pain Without Tingling

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – The Senza spinal cord stimulation system has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic back pain without the tingling sensation that characterizes more traditional pain-relieving methods. The implanted device uses high-frequency stimulation to avoid the tingling sensation known as "paresthesia," the agency said in a news release. Spinal pain could be characterized by conditions including failed back surgery syndrome, low back pain and leg pain. Before treatment with Senza begins, potential users are treated with a trial system for a week or two, the FDA said. Once a physician determines that the trial device has worked, patients have minimally invasive surgery to implant Senza in the upper buttocks or abdomen. The device includes a patient-operated remote control. Senza's safety and effectiveness were clinically evaluated in a study ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Back Pain, Tramadol, Oxycodone, Methadone, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Chronic Pain, Morphine, Norco, Fentanyl, Lortab, Codeine, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen

When to Ice, When to Heat

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 10, 2015 – Athletes aren't always sure whether to use heat or ice on injuries and aches and pains, so here is some advice from experts. If you suffer a sudden sports injury, you should follow a recovery program known as RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation. "Elevation is probably the most important thing because it limits the amount of blood flow to the area and the amount of swelling," Dr. Scott Lynch, director of sports medicine at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, said in a center news release. Applying cold is important because it helps narrow blood vessels, preventing blood from accumulating at the injury site and causing too much inflammation and swelling that can delay healing. Icing an injury for the first 48 to 72 hours reduces the amount of secondary tissue damage and can also ease pain, said Dr. Cayce Onks, a family and sports medicine doctor at the medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Tendonitis, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Fracture, bone, Flector, Flector Patch, Ketorolac

Study Rates Migraine Medications

Posted 20 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 – The best medications to use if you suffer migraine headaches are listed in a new study. Researchers reviewed recent scientific literature and concluded that a number of classes of drugs were effective for treating acute migraine. These include triptans, dihydroergotamine (DHE) and many NSAIDS (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that include aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen). Also on the list: butorphanol nasal spray, and the combination medications sumatriptan/naproxen and acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeine. Several other medications are "probably effective" or "possibly effective," according to the study in the January issue of the journal Headache. While powerful opioid pain drugs such as butorphanol, codeine/acetaminophen and tramadol/acetaminophen are likely effective migraine treatments, they are not recommended for regular use, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Migraine, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Migraine Prevention, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Imitrex, Excedrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Migraine Prophylaxis, Maxalt, Etodolac, Sumatriptan

Knee Arthritis Drugs Beat Placebos, but Study Finds No Clear Winner

Posted 6 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 – Pain-relieving treatments for knee arthritis all work better than doing nothing – but it's hard to point to a clear winner, a new research review concluded. Using data from almost 140 studies, researchers found all of the widely used arthritis treatments – from over-the-counter painkillers to pain-relieving injections – brought more relief to aching knees over three months than did placebo pills. But there were some surprises in the study, according to lead researcher Dr. Raveendhara Bannuru, of Tufts Medical Center in Boston. Overall, the biggest benefit came from injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) – a treatment some professional medical groups consider only marginally effective. Hyaluronic acid is a lubricating substance found naturally in the joints. Over the years, studies have been mixed as to whether injections of synthetic HA help arthritic joints, ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Paracetamol, Cortisone, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Orthovisc, Flector

Common Painkillers May Help Prevent Certain Skin Cancers, Study Finds

Posted 18 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 – Common painkillers, including ibuprofen, might slightly reduce your risk of developing a form of skin cancer, researchers say. Use of ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) appear to reduce the risk of squamous cell skin cancer by 15 percent, the researchers concluded after reviewing nine prior studies. Squamous cell skin cancer is usually caused by sun exposure. These painkillers "have potential as part of a skin cancer-prevention strategy," said review co-author Catherine Olsen, a senior research officer with QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. But Olsen and other experts aren't ready to recommend popping these or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to prevent skin cancer. For one thing, these drugs are associated with risks of their own. "Don't rely on aspirin or other nonsteroidal ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Vicoprofen, Skin Cancer, Advil PM, Naprosyn, Vimovo, Advil Cold and Sinus, Treximet, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Naprelan, Naprelan '375', Hydrocodone/Ibuprofen, Anaprox, Duexis, Motrin PM, Motrin IB

Some Painkillers Tied to Bleeding Risk in Those With Abnormal Heartbeat

Posted 17 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 – People with the abnormal heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation who take common painkillers might significantly increase their risk for bleeding and blood clots, according to a new study. That risk was even higher among patients who took a blood thinner along with one of these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory painkiller drugs (NSAIDs), which include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Aleve) and celecoxib (Celebrex). "If you add NSAIDs on top of blood-thinning medication, you double the risk of bleeding," said lead researcher Dr. Gunnar Gislason, from the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen. Many people with atrial fibrillation take blood thinners to reduce the risk of stroke, he noted. Atrial fibrillation causes the upper chambers of the heart to contract quickly and irregularly. These abnormal contractions allow blood to pool in the heart, forming clots ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Atrial Fibrillation, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Relafen

Painkillers May Halve Risk of Breast Cancer Return in Obese Women: Study

Posted 14 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 14, 2014 – Obese women who have battled breast cancer might halve their chances of a recurrence if they take aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) regularly, new research suggests. The researchers followed 440 breast cancer survivors – most of them past menopause and overweight or obese – who were diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. The women had estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, which requires the hormone estrogen to grow. Over the seven-year follow-up, taking the pain medications was linked to a difference in recurrence: "Twelve percent of those not taking NSAIDs had a recurrence, but 6 percent of those taking the drugs did," said study author Linda deGraffenried, an associate professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Texas in Austin. Of the 440 women, 159 used painkillers and 281 did not. Most of those using painkillers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Breast Cancer, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Relafen

More Painkillers May Raise Heart Risks for Older Women: Review

Posted 8 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 8, 2014 – A category of painkillers that includes the popular over-the-counter drug naproxen (Aleve) might increase an older woman's risk of heart attack or stroke, researchers report. Doctors already knew that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that target and inhibit the so-called "cox-2 enzyme" can raise a person's heart attack risk. This new study found the same sort of heart risks accompany NSAIDs that don't specifically target cox-2, but still inhibit the enzyme to some degree. That category of NSAIDs was associated with a 17 percent increase in postmenopausal women's risk of heart attack or stroke, compared to a 13 percent increase associated with NSAIDs that specifically target and inhibit cox-2. "These are widely used drugs in this country and worldwide, so it has huge ramifications," said study author Dr. Anthony Bavry, an associate professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Relafen, Naprosyn, Ketoprofen, Lodine

FDA Panel Sees No Heart-Safety Advantage With Naproxen

Posted 11 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2014 – The science isn't convincing enough to say that naproxen – the key pain reliever in Aleve – is safer for the heart than other popular anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin), U.S. health advisers ruled Tuesday. The decision was highly anticipated, since a vote in favor of naproxen's superiority might have led to a product labeling change, experts said. However, the 16-9 vote by the advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not find enough evidence to put naproxen ahead of other pain relievers in terms of heart risk. The FDA isn't required to follow the recommendations of its advisory committees but it usually does so. Naproxen, ibuprofen and aspirin fall under the umbrella term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Millions of people take these medicines to help relieve muscle aches, headaches and pain from ... Read more

Related support groups: Naproxen, Aleve, Naprosyn, Vimovo, Treximet, Naprelan, Naprelan '375', Anaprox, Midol Extended Relief, Naproxen Sodium DS, Esomeprazole/naproxen, Anaprox-DS, Naprelan '500', Naproxen/Pseudoephedrine, Aleve-D Cold and Sinus, Prevacid NapraPAC 375, Flanax Pain Reliever, Aleve Sinus & Headache, Naproxen/Sumatriptan, Prevacid NapraPAC

Certain Blood Proteins Higher in People Prone to Outbursts of Rage

Posted 18 Dec 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 18, 2013 – Recurrent, unwarranted blow-ups such as road rage may have a biological basis, according to a new study. Blood tests of people who display the hostile outbursts that characterize a psychiatric illness known as intermittent explosive disorder show signs of inflammation, researchers say. "What we show is that inflammation markers [proteins] are up in these aggressive individuals," said Dr. Emil Coccaro, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. Currently, medication and behavior therapy are used to treat intermittent explosive disorder, which affects about 16 million Americans, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health. But these methods are effective in fewer than 50 percent of cases, the study authors noted. Coccaro now wants to see if anti-inflammatory medicines can reduce both unwarranted ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Relafen, Naprosyn, Ketoprofen, Lodine

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