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Painkillers May Halve Risk of Breast Cancer Return in Obese Women: Study

Posted 14 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 14, 2014 – Obese women who have battled breast cancer might halve their chances of a recurrence if they take aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) regularly, new research suggests. The researchers followed 440 breast cancer survivors – most of them past menopause and overweight or obese – who were diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. The women had estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, which requires the hormone estrogen to grow. Over the seven-year follow-up, taking the pain medications was linked to a difference in recurrence: "Twelve percent of those not taking NSAIDs had a recurrence, but 6 percent of those taking the drugs did," said study author Linda deGraffenried, an associate professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Texas in Austin. Of the 440 women, 159 used painkillers and 281 did not. Most of those using painkillers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Breast Cancer, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn

More Painkillers May Raise Heart Risks for Older Women: Review

Posted 8 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 8, 2014 – A category of painkillers that includes the popular over-the-counter drug naproxen (Aleve) might increase an older woman's risk of heart attack or stroke, researchers report. Doctors already knew that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that target and inhibit the so-called "cox-2 enzyme" can raise a person's heart attack risk. This new study found the same sort of heart risks accompany NSAIDs that don't specifically target cox-2, but still inhibit the enzyme to some degree. That category of NSAIDs was associated with a 17 percent increase in postmenopausal women's risk of heart attack or stroke, compared to a 13 percent increase associated with NSAIDs that specifically target and inhibit cox-2. "These are widely used drugs in this country and worldwide, so it has huge ramifications," said study author Dr. Anthony Bavry, an associate professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

FDA Panel Sees No Heart-Safety Advantage With Naproxen

Posted 11 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2014 – The science isn't convincing enough to say that naproxen – the key pain reliever in Aleve – is safer for the heart than other popular anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin), U.S. health advisers ruled Tuesday. The decision was highly anticipated, since a vote in favor of naproxen's superiority might have led to a product labeling change, experts said. However, the 16-9 vote by the advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not find enough evidence to put naproxen ahead of other pain relievers in terms of heart risk. The FDA isn't required to follow the recommendations of its advisory committees but it usually does so. Naproxen, ibuprofen and aspirin fall under the umbrella term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Millions of people take these medicines to help relieve muscle aches, headaches and pain from ... Read more

Related support groups: Naproxen, Aleve, Naprosyn, Treximet, Vimovo, Naprelan '375', Naprelan, Anaprox, Midol Extended Relief, Anaprox-DS, Esomeprazole/naproxen, Naprelan '500', Aleve-D Cold and Sinus, Naproxen/Pseudoephedrine, Naproxen Sodium DS, Prevacid NapraPAC 375, Flanax Pain Reliever, Aleve Sinus & Headache, Naproxen/Sumatriptan, Prevacid NapraPAC

Certain Blood Proteins Higher in People Prone to Outbursts of Rage

Posted 18 Dec 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 18, 2013 – Recurrent, unwarranted blow-ups such as road rage may have a biological basis, according to a new study. Blood tests of people who display the hostile outbursts that characterize a psychiatric illness known as intermittent explosive disorder show signs of inflammation, researchers say. "What we show is that inflammation markers [proteins] are up in these aggressive individuals," said Dr. Emil Coccaro, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. Currently, medication and behavior therapy are used to treat intermittent explosive disorder, which affects about 16 million Americans, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health. But these methods are effective in fewer than 50 percent of cases, the study authors noted. Coccaro now wants to see if anti-inflammatory medicines can reduce both unwarranted ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

Always Ask a Vet Before Giving Painkillers to Pets, Expert Says

Posted 7 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 7 – When people feel pain, they often reach for common medicines such as aspirin or Motrin. These types of drugs, known as NSAIDs, also are used to treat arthritis pain in dogs and to manage pain after surgery in dogs and cats. But NSAID use in pets carries risks as well as benefits. And all dogs and cats should have a thorough physical exam by a veterinarian – including a review of the pet's medical history – before being given NSAIDs , according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Pet owners also need to be informed about possible side effects, including those that could signal danger. Some of the most common side effects of NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) in animals reported to the FDA are vomiting, loss of appetite, reduced levels of activity and diarrhea. While your pet is taking NSAIDs, watch for these side effects as well as looking for blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine

Health Tip: Can I Take an NSAID?

Posted 4 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

-- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common pain-relieving medications that often are available over-the-counter. However, the American Academy of Family Physicians says some people shouldn't take these drugs, among them: People with an allergy to pain relievers, including aspirin. People who drink three or more alcoholic beverages per day. People who have stomach or intestinal bleeding, or peptic ulcers. People who have kidney disease, heart disease or liver disease. People with a bleeding disorder or who take medication to thin the blood. Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

High Doses of Common Painkillers May Raise Risk for Heart Trouble

Posted 29 May 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 29 – People who take high doses of common painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) face a greater risk for heart problems, a new analysis shows. Although NSAIDs are used around the world to help people with inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, a review of nearly 650 randomized trials found that taking either 2,400 milligrams (mg) of ibuprofen or 150 mg of diclofenac daily increased the risk of heart attacks, strokes and death by about one-third. The findings were published online May 29 in the journal The Lancet. The study authors said, however, that the increased risk of heart attacks from individual NSAIDs is proportional to a patient's underlying risk for heart attacks. Since people with a history of heart problems or risk factors for heart disease are at greatest risk, they concluded that doctors should weigh that before ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Heart Disease, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Heart Failure, Mobic, Congestive Heart Failure, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Myocardial Infarction

Common Painkillers Tied to Kidney Risks for Children: Study

Posted 25 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 – Children taking the common painkillers known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for acute kidney damage, particularly when the kids are dehydrated, a new study finds. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (commonly called NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (brand names Advil and Motrin), naproxen (Aleve) and ketorolac (Toradol) are used to relieve pain and fever. "The one thing we did see that seemed to be connected to kidney damage was dehydration," said lead researcher Dr. Jason Misurac, a nephrologist at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. For the study, which was published in the Jan. 25 online edition of the Journal of Pediatrics, Misurac's team looked at the medical records of children admitted to Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis from 1999 through mid-2010. Over that time, they identified more than 1,000 cases of children ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

Health Tip: Should You Take NSAIDs?

Posted 9 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

-- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are popular pain relievers, usually sold over the counter. But they may not be safe for everyone. The American Academy of Family Physicians says you should speak with your doctor before you take an NSAID if you meet any of these criteria: Having a known allergy to any pain relievers, such as aspirin. Drinking at least three alcoholic beverages per day. Having stomach ulcers or bleeding in the intestines or stomach. Having heart, kidney or liver disease. Having a condition that requires a blood-thinning medication. Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

Common Painkillers Might Boost Odds for Second Heart Attack

Posted 11 Sep 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 10 – People who've already suffered a heart attack may face higher odds of death or subsequent heart attack if they regularly take a common form of painkiller, Danish researchers report. The painkillers are known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and include over-the-counter drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve), as well as prescription drugs such as Celebrex (celecoxib), the researchers noted. "These results support previous findings that NSAIDs have no apparent safe treatment window among patients with a [prior] heart attack," said lead researcher Dr. Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen from the department of cardiology at the University of Copenhagen. "Long-term caution with use of NSAIDs is advised in all patients after a heart attack," she said. Olsen added that "it is important to get the message out to clinicians taking care of ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Attack, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Myocardial Infarction, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn

Common Painkillers May Help Prevent Skin Cancer: Study

Posted 29 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 29 – Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – which include medicine cabinet staples such as aspirin, Motrin and Aleve – appears to significantly lower the risk for developing several major forms of skin cancer, a new Danish study reveals. What's more, the apparent protective impact of both prescription and nonprescription NSAIDs on skin cancer risk seems to be stronger the longer someone takes them. Over-the-counter NSAIDs are used to control pain, fever and swelling. NSAIDs also include prescription medicines called COX-2 enzyme inhibitors, such as Celebrex (celecoxib). "Our study showed that users of common painkillers, known as NSAIDs, have a lower risk of the three major types of skin cancer, [including] malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma," said study lead author, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir, at the department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Skin Cancer, Arthrotec

FDA Medwatch Alert: Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) - Drug Safety Communication: Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD) Can be Associated With Stomach Acid Drugs

Posted 8 Feb 2012 by Drugs.com

AcipHex (rabeprazole sodium) Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) Nexium (esomeprazole magnesium)  Omeprazole (omeprazole) Over-the-Counter (OTC) Prevacid (lansoprazole) and OTC Prevacid 24hr Prilosec (omeprazole)  and OTC Protonix (pantoprazole sodium) Vimovo (esomeprazole magnesium and naproxen) Zegerid (omeprazole and Sodium bicarbonate) and OTC   [Posted 02/08/2012] ISSUE: FDA notified the public that the use of stomach acid drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be associated with an increased risk of Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea (CDAD). A diagnosis of CDAD should be considered for patients taking PPIs who develop diarrhea that does not improve. The FDA is working with manufacturers to include information about the increased risk of CDAD with use of PPIs in the drug labels. FDA is also reviewing the risk of CDAD in users of histamine H2 receptor blockers. H2 rece ... Read more

Related support groups: Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Lansoprazole, Aciphex, Zegerid, Rabeprazole, Vimovo, Esomeprazole, Prilosec OTC, Prevacid SoluTab, Kapidex, Dexlansoprazole, Zegerid OTC, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate, Protonix IV

Herbal Medicines for Arthritis Not Backed by Evidence

Posted 12 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 – There is little evidence to support the widespread use of herbal medicines to relieve the symptoms of osteoarthritis, according to a review of these products. Osteoarthritis is a painful condition that involves damage to cartilage and other structures in and around the joints, particularly the fingers, knees and hips. It differs from rheumatoid arthritis, which is an immune-based disorder. Devil's claw, cat's claw, ginger, nettle, rosehip, turmeric, willow bark, Indian frankincense and vegetable extracts of avocado or soybean oils are all among the herbal medicines traditionally used to treat osteoarthritis. "Unfortunately, a large number of people suffer from osteoarthritis pain," said one expert, Dr. Robert Graham, an internist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Current pharmacological management is largely focused upon reduction of pain and of ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Glucosamine, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone, 5-HTP, Valerian, Green Tea, Garlic, Flector

Health Tip: Don't Take Too Many NSAIDs

Posted 23 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been around for years and are frequently the medication of choice to relieve pain and inflammation. But taking too many of this type of drug, which includes aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, can lead to potential complications, including stomach bleeding or ulcer. The American Gastroenterological Association says reasons for potential NSAID overdose include: Taking a subsequent dose too soon after taking the initial one. Taking more of the medication at one time than is recommended. Taking a higher dose over a 24-hour period than is recommended. Taking more than one NSAID-containing medication at a time Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine, Vimovo

Health Tip: Alcohol Can Interact With Medications

Posted 25 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter medications may seem safer because they don't require a prescription. But they can still interact badly when alcohol enters the mix. The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these popular medications that may have adverse effects if mixed with alcohol: NSAID pain relievers, which may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding if taken while consuming as few as two alcoholic drink per week. Acetaminophen, which may cause liver damage when taken with alcohol. Some OTC antihistamines can make you drowsy when taken with alcohol. Decongestants and cough medications that contain the cough suppressant dextromethorphan can increase drowsiness when taken with alcohol. Herbal supplements, such as kava kava, St. John's wort or valerian root, may increase drowsiness if taken with alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, Norco, Tylenol, Lortab, Codeine, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Benadryl, Meloxicam, Promethazine, Diclofenac, Advil, Zyrtec, Voltaren, Hydroxyzine, Mobic, Claritin

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Osteoarthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, NSAID-Induced Ulcer Prophylaxis

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