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Tai Chi: Rx for Arthritic Knees

Posted 14 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, a new study looks East for relief – to the martial art tai chi. Researchers concluded that tai chi offers an alternative to physical therapy for common knee osteoarthritis – and it might also boost well-being. This ancient Chinese exercise may particularly benefit overweight older adults, the researchers said. Heavier people are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than people with a healthy weight, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This research strengthened the evidence that the effectiveness and durability of both tai chi and physical therapy extend to obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis," said Dr. Chenchen Wang. "Such people typically face limited options due to ineffectiveness of osteoarthritis treatments," Wang said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Endocet

Giving the 'Green Light' to Migraine Relief

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 – A new study sheds light – literally – on a potential means of easing migraine pain. Researchers in Boston exposed 69 migraine patients to different colors of light. They found that while blue light exacerbated headache pain, a narrow spectrum of low-intensity green light significantly reduced light sensitivity. In some cases, this green light also reduced migraine pain by about 20 percent, the researchers found. They noted that migraine headache affects nearly 15 percent of people worldwide, and a frequent symptom of migraine is light sensitivity, also known as photophobia. "Although photophobia is not usually as incapacitating as headache pain itself, the inability to endure light can be disabling," study author Rami Burstein, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, said in a medical center news release. "More than 80 percent of migraine attacks ... Read more

Related support groups: Migraine, Celebrex, Fioricet, Excedrin, Imitrex, Tylenol PM, Maxalt, Sumatriptan, Fiorinal, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Relpax, Zomig, Midrin, Advil PM, Treximet, Vioxx, Ergotamine, Celecoxib

Got Unused Meds? Here's What to Do

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – While doing your spring cleaning, don't just toss out expired or unused prescription medications. Unwanted drugs need to be properly disposed of to reduce the risk of abuse or accidental use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Follow disposal instructions on the drug label or patient information that came with the medicine. Don't put medicines down the sink or flush them down the toilet unless this information specifically says to do so. Call local law enforcement agencies to find out if your community has a medication take-back program or event. Or, ask your local trash or recycling services about medication disposal services and guidelines, the FDA suggests. Another option is to deliver unused medicines to collectors registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). These authorized sites may be retail, clinic or hospital pharmacies, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Plan B, Oxycodone, Lexapro, Methadone, Zoloft, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Cymbalta, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Effexor, Prozac, Norco, Mirena, Fentanyl, Morphine, Sprintec, NuvaRing

Health Tip: Enjoy a Healthier Plane Ride

Posted 28 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Planning a plane trip? There are steps you can take for a better, healthier excursion. Here are suggestions from the American Academy of Family Physicians: Store medication to be taken during the trip in a carry-on bag. Pack extra meds in case of unexpected delays. Talk to your doctor about whether you'll need to adjust your meds during your trip. Keep an identification card with you at all times if you have epilepsy or diabetes. Also, bring a list of all medications and doses, and your doctor's contact information. Drink plenty of water before and during your flight to prevent dehydration. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, NyQuil, Tylenol PM, Unisom, Alka-Seltzer, Doxylamine, Motion Sickness, Benadryl Allergy, Advil PM, Promethazine DM, Itch Relief, Simply Sleep, Sominex, ZzzQuil, Cyclizine, Nyquil Cold Medicine, All-Nite

Painkiller Addiction Relapse More Likely for Some

Posted 22 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – Certain factors can help health care professionals predict who might relapse during treatment for prescription opioid painkiller addiction, Canadian researchers report. Opioid abuse is a serious problem in Canada and the United States, the researchers said. Methadone treatment is the most common therapy. But, nearly half of patients continue to abuse opioids during or after methadone treatment, researchers noted. Opioid painkillers include such drugs as Oxycontin, Percocet and Vicodin. "We can improve our tailoring of treatment to each patient if we know who among patients taking methadone treatment is at high risk for opioid relapse," said principal author Dr. Zena Samaan. Samaan is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. "As well, health care providers can target more aggressive therapies ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Can Certain Allergy Meds Worsen Restless Legs Syndrome?

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – Over-the-counter allergy medications may worsen symptoms of restless legs syndrome, a neurologist contends. People with the syndrome experience uncomfortable sensations and strong urges to move their legs, which can be painful and disrupt sleep, according to Dr. William Ondo. He is director of the Movement Disorders Clinic at Houston Methodist Hospital. Nearly 12 million people in the United States have restless legs syndrome, according to the American Sleep Association. "Patients with restless legs syndrome already have difficulty sleeping as their symptoms tend to worsen at night or with rest, but sedating antihistamines ... can intensify the symptoms," Ondo said in a hospital news release. Many people take sedating antihistamines to treat sneezing, runny nose and other symptoms of seasonal allergies. "We don't yet understand why sedating antihistamines ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Allergic Rhinitis, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Atarax, Tylenol PM, Cyproheptadine, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Spinal Fusion Not Always Necessary for Back Pain, Studies Say

Posted 13 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 – Spinal fusion surgery is too often used to treat lower back pain when a simpler procedure would suffice for many patients, according to a pair of new clinical trials. People suffering from spinal stenosis – pinched nerves caused by a narrowing of the spinal canal – received similar pain relief with fewer complications when doctors performed a simpler spine surgery called decompression, as opposed to a full-fledged spinal fusion, a study from Sweden found. "Fusion was associated with longer operating time, longer hospital stay and was more expensive than decompression alone," said lead researcher Dr. Peter Forsth, an orthopedic surgeon with the Stockholm Spine Center. However, certain patients would do better with a spinal fusion, the other clinical trial concludes. That trial found that spinal fusion provided better results for low-back pain patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Back Pain, Fioricet, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Orthopedic Surgery, Advil PM, Esgic, Headache Relief, Percogesic, Bupap, Esgic-Plus, Excedrin Extra Strength, Dolgic Plus, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Menstrual PMS, Dolgic, Aleve PM

Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Acetaminophen – commonly known as Tylenol in the United States – isn't an effective choice for relieving osteoarthritis pain in the hip or knee, or for improving joint function, a new study finds. Although the drug rated slightly better than placebo in studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, the researchers said. "Regardless of dose, the prescription drug diclofenac is the most effective drug among painkillers in terms of improving pain and function in osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Sven Trelle. He's co-director of clinical trials at the University of Bern in Switzerland. However, even diclofenac comes with side effects. "If you are thinking of using a painkiller for osteoarthritis, you should consider diclofenac," Trelle said, but also ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

Health Tip: Managing a Fever at Home

Posted 15 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- While fever is part of the body's defense against illness, it doesn't mean having one is a comfortable experience. To help deal with the symptoms of fever, the University of Portland suggests: Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Never give a child aspirin. Soak in a warm or tepid bath to help bring down a fever. Don't take a cool or cold bath. Drink plenty of fluids. Get immediate treatment for complications of fever, such as seizure, difficulty breathing, delirium, severe headache with stiff neck, or fever of 104 degrees or higher. Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Fever, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, NyQuil, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol with Codeine, Vicoprofen

Health Tip: Help Prevent Back Pain During Sleep

Posted 2 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If back pain prevents you from getting a good night's sleep, your position and mattress may be to blame. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: If you're a back sleeper, place a pillow beneath your knees to ease pressure on your back. If you're a stomach sleeper, place the pillow under your belly. Side sleepers should place the pillow between the knees. Invest in a new mattress. Medium to medium-firm is best for back support. If you can't buy a new one, place some plywood beneath the mattress. Carefully ease in and out of bed, avoiding quick movements. Roll to your side, use your arms to push yourself up and carefully swing your legs over the side of the bed. Exercise regularly, making sure to work your abdominal and back muscles. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Sciatica, Fioricet, Herniated Disc, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Scoliosis, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Breakthrough Pain, Advil PM, Esgic, Headache Relief, Percogesic, Bupap, Esgic-Plus, Excedrin Extra Strength, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine

Prenatal Acetaminophen Use Tied to Higher Asthma Risk in Kids: Study

Posted 10 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 – Pregnant women who take the painkiller acetaminophen – best known under the brand name Tylenol – may be more likely to have a child with asthma, new research suggests. Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, researchers found that prenatal exposure to the over-the-counter medicine was associated with an increased risk for asthma in children. However, the study authors and a U.S. expert agreed that the effect seen in the study doesn't yet warrant any change in guidelines regarding pain relief during pregnancy. In the study, Norwegian researchers tracked data from a large database – the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The investigators focused on conditions during pregnancy for which some expectant mothers took acetaminophen, and compared that data against rates of asthma among 114,500 children as they reached the ages of 3 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Percocet, Vicodin, Emergency Contraception, Norco, Lortab, Asthma, Tylenol, Influenza, Acetaminophen, Asthma - Maintenance, Cold Symptoms, Postcoital Contraception, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Female Infertility, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100

Many Chronic Pain Sufferers May Overuse Nonprescription Painkillers

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Many people with chronic pain ignore dosing instructions on over-the-counter pain medicines and put themselves at risk for an overdose, a new survey suggests. An overdose of these medicines can result in serious side effects, such as stomach bleeding, ulcers, liver damage and even death, according to the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). The AGA-commissioned poll of more than 1,000 U.S. adults aged 30 and older and 251 gastroenterologists found that 43 percent of chronic pain sufferers said they knowingly have taken more than the recommended dose of an over-the-counter (OTC) pain medicine at some point. Common types of OTC pain medicines include acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve) and aspirin. "Pain is incredibly personal, but taking more than the recommended ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Methadone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Aspirin, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Tylenol, Muscle Pain, Chronic Pain

Health Tip: Reduce Your Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions

Posted 20 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter (OTC) medications may be available without a prescription, but that doesn't mean they don't come with potential risks. Here's advice on how to reduce your risk of adverse effects from OTC meds, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: Only take an OTC medication if you really need it. Check with your doctor before you take such medication. Read product labels to understand the ingredients, risks and how the medication works. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions. Take the medications exactly as instructed with any supplied measuring device. Never mix a medication into food or drink unless the pharmacist or doctor says it's OK. Never take a medication with alcohol. If you take vitamins, don't take them at the same time as a medication. Make a list of any adverse reactions you have with a medication, and discuss with your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone, MS Contin, Ultram, Butrans, Hydromorphone, Nucynta, Buprenorphine, Pseudoephedrine

Acetaminophen Tops List of Accidental Infant Poisonings

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Infants are just as susceptible to accidental poisonings as older children are, especially when it comes to medication errors, new research reports. A decade of poison control center calls in the United States showed that acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) was the most common medication mistake for infants. This was followed by H2-blockers (for acid reflux), gastrointestinal medications, combination cough/cold products, antibiotics and ibuprofen (such as Motrin or Advil). The most common non-medication exposures were diaper care and rash products, plants and creams, lotions and make-up, the investigators found. "I was surprised with the large number of exposures even in this young age group," said lead author Dr. A. Min Kang, a medical toxicology fellow at Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix in Arizona. "Pediatricians typically do not begin poison ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, NyQuil, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol with Codeine, Vicoprofen, Percocet 10/325

Holiday Luggage Can Be Hazardous to Your Back

Posted 18 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 – Heavy luggage may be more than a hassle for holiday travels – those overloaded bags can sometimes cause health problems, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) warns. "Individuals are at high risk for back, neck and shoulder strains when carelessly handling heavy luggage," Dr. Nitin Khanna, an orthopedic surgeon and AAOS spokesperson, said in an academy news release. "Always be cognizant of the way you are lifting heavy luggage to avoid painful injuries," Khanna advised. In 2014, Americans suffered almost 73,000 luggage-related injuries, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. When you shop for new luggage, look for a sturdy, light piece with wheels and a handle, the AAOS said. Pack lightly. If possible, put items in a few smaller bags rather than one large piece of luggage. Never twist your body when carrying or lifting luggage. ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Methadone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen, Dilaudid

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