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Surgery News

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. Tommy John surgery is named after the big league pitcher who was the first to undergo the operation more than 40 years ago. Its medical name is ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. The procedure involves replacing the UCL in the medial elbow with a tendon from the same arm or the hamstring area. The researchers found that 83 Major League Baseball pitchers who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow, Surgical Prophylaxis

Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer. If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future. The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive an average of less than two years, even after treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the study authors said. "We've had luck with other types of cancer in removing the brakes on the immune system to allow it to fight the tumors, but this has not been the case with glioblastoma," said study author Dr. Anhua Wu, of First Hospital of China Medical University in Shenyang, China. "If our discovery of these genes is validated in other studies, we could use this 'gene signature' to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Brain Tumor, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Head & Neck Surgery, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma, Head Imaging

Weight-Loss Surgery Helps Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery quickly improves blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, and should be recommended or considered as a treatment for certain obese people with diabetes. That's the message of a joint statement endorsed by 45 international professional organizations. It appears in the June issue of the journal Diabetes Care. "Given the rapid developments in the field, it is important to focus on this topic for those who care for individuals with diabetes. These new guidelines, based on the results of multiple clinical studies, validate that [weight-loss] surgery is indicated in certain people with diabetes and can yield significantly improved outcomes," editor-in-chief of Diabetes Care Dr. William Cefalu said in a journal news release. These are the first guidelines recommending surgery as a treatment option specifically for diabetes, he added. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Rural Hospitals Often Safer, Cheaper for Common Surgeries: Study

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 – Having a commonplace surgery – such as a gallbladder removal – may be safer when done in a rural hospital compared to a suburban or city hospital, a new study finds. "This study gives credence to what rural surgeons long suspected – that well-done rural surgery is safe and cost-effective," study author Dr. Tyler Hughes said in a University of Michigan news release. Hughes is one of only two surgeons at McPherson Hospital in rural McPherson, Kan., and a director of the American Board of Surgery. Rural hospitals are also called critical access hospitals. They're the closest option for tens of millions of patients living outside major cities and suburban areas, the researchers said. For the study, the researchers reviewed 1.6 million surgeries. They were performed at 828 rural hospitals or 3,600 larger hospitals. Specifically, the researchers compared outcomes ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Gallbladder Disease, Gallstones

Parents Often Don't Get Rid of Leftover Prescription Opioids

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 – When children are prescribed opioid painkillers, such as Oxycontin or Percocet, for surgery or illness, about half of parents say they keep the leftover medicine on hand. "We found that the amount of pain medication prescribed for children is frequently greater than the amount used, and too few parents recall clear direction from their provider about what to do with leftover medication," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. "This is a missed opportunity to prevent prescription drug misuse among children," Clark added in a statement from the University of Michigan Health System. "Many parents simply keep extra pain pills in their home. Those leftover pills represent easy access to narcotics for teens and their friends." According to the poll results, about a third of parents said their kids had ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Surgery, Oxycodone, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Ultram

No Statins Before Heart Surgery, Study Suggests

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – Taking cholesterol-lowering statins right before heart surgery, once touted as a way to prevent common postoperative complications, has no benefit and may even cause harm, a new study suggests. In that setting, Crestor (rosuvastatin) did not prevent either the abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation or heart damage, and it was linked to a slightly increased risk of kidney damage, researchers said. "There are many valid reasons why one may want to take statins, but prevention of postoperative complications in cardiac surgery is not one of them," said lead researcher Dr. Barbara Casadei. She is a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Oxford in England. "Our study is consistent with the idea that well-established beneficial effects of statin therapy, such as the reduction in heart attacks and strokes, are only achieved by long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Renal Failure, Pravastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Chronic Kidney Disease, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lescol

Robots Stake Their Claim in the Operating Room

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A surgical robot outperformed human surgeons in stitching the small intestines of pigs back together, researchers report. Without any direct human interaction, the Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) reconnected the intestines with sutures that proved more accurate, evenly spaced and durable than those created by human hands, the machine's developers said. The test shows it's possible to create a smart robot that will be able to perform an entire surgical procedure on its own, much as robot technology is now used to assemble complex machinery or safely steer airplanes and automobiles, said senior researcher Dr. Peter C.W. Kim. "Our hypothesis is you should be able to eventually program the entire surgical procedure beginning-to-end, intelligently and autonomously," said Kim, who is a pediatric surgeon and vice president of the Sheikh Zayed Institute for ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Emergency Surgery Risky Business in Poor Countries

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – People who have emergency surgery in poor nations may be much likelier to die than patients in wealthy countries, a new study finds. British researchers analyzed data on more than 10,000 people who had emergency abdominal surgery in 58 countries. They found death rates in the 30 days after surgery were three times higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. This disparity remained even after the investigators accounted for patient factors such as diabetes, smoking and physical condition before surgery. "The association between increasing mortality and lower-income countries might be explained by differences in prognosis, in treatment or maybe both. What we can say is that our study highlights the significant disparity between countries, and an urgent need to address it," researcher Dr. Aneel Bhangu, from the University of Birmingham, said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Diabetes, Type 2, Smoking, Smoking Cessation

Flamel Technologies Receives FDA Approval of Akovaz (ephedrine sulfate) for Surgical Hypotension

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

LYON, FRANCE--(Marketwired - May 2, 2016) - Flamel Technologies (NASDAQ: FLML) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Company's New Drug Application (NDA) for Akovaz™ (ephedrine sulfate), a drug administered parenterally as a pressor agent to address clinically important hypotension in surgical settings. Flamel obtained NDA approval for Akovaz as scheduled on April 29 and is the first to receive approval from the FDA for ephedrine sulfate. Flamel expects to launch Akovaz during the third quarter 2016 in a strength of 50 mg/mL. "We are very excited to receive FDA approval for Akovaz, the third product from our Éclat portfolio, and in line with the PDUFA date expectations. Revenue expectations associated with this product were included in our previously issued 2016 revenue guidance of $110 - $130 million. Our Éclat portfolio of products, which in ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Anesthesia, Hypotension, Ephedrine, Akovaz

Nipple-Preserving Mastectomies Appear Safe for High-Risk Women: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 25, 2016 – Preventive breast removal (mastectomy) that preserves the nipple and surrounding skin may be as effective in preventing breast cancer in high-risk women as more invasive surgeries, a new study suggests. The study included 348 women with BRCA genetic mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer. They had preventive nipple-sparing mastectomies between 1968 and 2013. Of those women, 203 had both breasts removed (bilateral mastectomy) and 145 had one breast removed preventively after cancer occurred in the other breast. Three to five years after surgery, none of the women who had bilateral nipple-sparing mastectomy developed breast cancer at any site. No breast cancers developed in the remaining skin, nipples or lymph nodes on the side of the breast removal. Seven women died from breast cancer during follow-up. All of them had a previous or concurrent breast ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention

New Guidelines Issued on Breast, Genital Plastic Surgery for Teen Girls

Posted 23 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – A growing interest among teenaged girls in plastic surgery on their breasts or genitals has prompted a leading ob/gyn group to recommend that doctors first talk to these young women about "normal" sexual development. "Our membership has been telling us this is coming up more and more frequently with their adolescent patients," said Dr. Julie Strickland. She is chair of the Adolescent Health Care Committee of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). The new recommendations also suggest that physicians screen these patients for body dysmorphic disorder, which is an obsession with an imagined or slight defect in appearance. There are already guidelines from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) on breast augmentation and reduction among teenagers. If it's strictly for cosmetic reasons, the society recommends surgery should ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Breast Asymmetry Disorder

Cancer History May Affect Survival After Organ Transplant

Posted 22 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – Organ transplant patients who previously had cancer may be at increased risk for new cancer and early death compared to organ recipients with no cancer history, new research suggests. The findings indicate that transplant patients with a history of cancer may need closer monitoring to detect recurrent and new cancers early, the study's senior author, Dr. Nancy Baxter, said in a news release from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Baxter is chief of the hospital's General Surgery Department. She and her colleagues reviewed 33 studies that included a total of nearly 400,000 patients in 12 countries. They found that organ recipients with previous cancer were 1.5 times more likely to die prematurely from any cause than those with no previous cancer. Moreover, those with previous cancer were nearly twice as likely to develop a new cancer and had three times higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Renal Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Graft-versus-host disease, Rejection Reversal, Kidney Transplant

Celebrity Cases May Help Spur Rise in Double Mastectomies

Posted 22 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – Media coverage of celebrities who battle breast cancer is not always balanced or thorough, and this skewed view may be one factor in the growing popularity of double mastectomies, a new study suggests. "Celebrities do have a significant impact on medical decision-making, but in this case it might be a negative effect," said study author Dr. Michael Sabel. He is chief of surgical oncology at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. "The media coverage represents a kind of bias that makes people think this [double mastectomy] is the [best] treatment for breast cancer," Sabel said. Still, the study didn't prove that media coverage actually caused the increase in double mastectomies seen in the past decade. In the study, Sabel and his team gathered information on 17 celebrities who publicly disclosed their breast cancer diagnosis between 2000 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Vascular Surgery

Childhood Cancer Survivors Often Feel Older Than Their Years

Posted 21 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 21, 2016 – Surviving a childhood cancer can take a toll on health, and new research shows that young adults who've been through the ordeal often feel aged before their time. "Our findings indicate survivors' accelerated aging, and also help us understand the health-related risks associated with having had cancer as a child," said study senior author Dr. Lisa Diller. She is chief medical officer of Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. "What's encouraging is that the lower quality-of-life scores are associated with chronic disease after treatment, not with a history of pediatric cancer itself," Diller explained in a Dana-Farber news release. The researchers studied data on thousands of childhood cancer survivors in the United States. Among 18- to 29-year-olds, overall health-related quality-of-life scores were similar to those of adults in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Heart Disease, Female Infertility

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Surgical Prophylaxis, Ophthalmic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Vascular Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Biliary Tract Surgery, Extracorporeal Perfusion