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Sleep Disorders Blog

Sleep Apnea May Boost Depression Risk in Men, Study Finds

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 – Men who have the sleep disorder known as obstructive sleep apnea appear to have a higher risk of depression, new research suggests. Men with undiagnosed, severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) had more than double the risk of depression compared to those without sleep apnea, said study researcher Carol Lang, a research fellow in the department of medicine at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Men who had both undiagnosed, severe apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness had an even greater risk of depression. Their risk of depression was up to five times greater, the study said. Lang said she can't explain why these conditions seem to be linked. "Many of the symptoms of OSA and depression overlap, such as tiredness, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, low vitality and poor concentration," she said. The two conditions also share some common risk factors, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Major Depressive Disorder, Sleep Apnea, Dysthymia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Shift Work Linked to Health Problems

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 – Shift work may harm your health, a new study warns. Researchers examined data on nearly 1,600 people in Wisconsin, comparing the health of shift workers with those who worked a 9-to-5 schedule. The results showed that shift workers were more likely to be overweight than people who didn't do shift work – 48 percent vs. 35 percent. Shift workers were also around 10 percent more likely to have sleep problems, get too little sleep, and be excessively sleepy. "Shift workers are more commonly men, minorities, and individuals with lower educational attainment and typically work in hospital settings, production, or shipping industries," lead investigator Marjory Givens, an associate scientist at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said in a Sleep Health journal news release. "Shift work employees are particularly vulnerable to experiencing ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Obesity, Fatigue

Too Much, Too Little Sleep May Up Stroke Risk for Those With High Blood Pressure

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 15, 2015 – People with high blood pressure who sleep less than five hours or more than eight hours each night may have significantly higher odds of a stroke, new research suggests. Analyzing data from more than 200,000 U.S. residents with high blood pressure, scientists determined that "insufficient" sleepers logging less than five hours of shuteye each night had an 83 percent increased risk of stroke compared to "healthy" sleepers who got seven to eight hours of sleep. "Long" sleepers reporting more than eight hours of nightly sleep experienced a 74 percent higher stroke risk than healthy sleepers, according to the study. "We were surprised, especially with the individuals reporting insufficient sleep, because most studies . . . have shown [only] a modest increase in the chances of suffering a stroke among those with short sleep duration," said study author Dr. Oluwaseun ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis

Insomniacs May Be More Sensitive to Pain

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – People with insomnia or poor sleep quality may be less tolerant of pain, new research suggests. The more frequent and severe the insomnia, the greater the sensitivity to pain, the Norwegian study showed. Additionally, the researchers noted that people with insomnia who also suffer from chronic pain have an even lower threshold for physical discomfort. It's important to note, however, that while the study found an association between a lack of quality sleep and increased pain sensitivity, it wasn't designed to show a cause-and-effect relationship. The study, led by Borge Sivertsen, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Bergen, involved more than 10,000 adults. The study participants all underwent a standard test of pain sensitivity by dunking their hands in a bath of cold water for 106 seconds. The volunteers were also asked about their sleep quality. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Headache, Back Pain, Sleep Disorders, Tramadol, Oxycodone, Insomnia, Methadone, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Chronic Pain, Morphine, Norco, Fentanyl, Tylenol, Lortab, Codeine

Study Links Sleep Troubles to Children's Mental Health

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – There is a link between sleep and young children's mental health, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at sleep patterns and the mental health of 1,000 children starting when they were toddlers. They found that those with sleep disorders at age 4 were at increased risk for mental health problems – such as anxiety and depression – at age 6. They also discovered that children with mental health problems at age 4 were at increased risk for sleep disorders at age 6. Due to the study's design, however, it wasn't possible for the researchers to prove that sleep problems caused mental health issues or vice versa; the researchers could only show an association between these factors. Insomnia was the most common type of sleep disorder. Insomnia was diagnosed in nearly 17 percent of the children at age 4 and in 43 percent of them at age 6. Insomnia increased the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Nightmares, Night Terrors, Dysthymia

Health Tip: Sleep Better During Pregnancy

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- A growing belly and various aches and pains can make sleep difficult during pregnancy. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these suggestions for a more restful sleep during pregnancy: Avoid caffeinated beverages. If you do indulge, only drink them in the morning or early afternoon. In the hours before bedtime, limit fluids and don't eat a heavy meal. Create a consistent sleeping and waking schedule. Skip intense exercise just before bed in favor of a relaxing bath. Press feet firmly against the wall if you have a leg cramp, or stand on the cramped leg. If your doctor says it's OK, practice daily yoga to help manage stress. Taking a childbirth or parenting class may also help ease baby-related anxiety. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Anxiety and Stress, Fatigue, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Delivery, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Sleepwalking Parents Likely to Have Sleepwalking Kids

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 – More than 60 percent of children with two sleepwalking parents go on to develop the condition themselves, new research shows. "These findings point to a strong genetic influence on sleepwalking and, to a lesser degree, sleep terrors," the Canadian study authors wrote. "Parents who have been sleepwalkers in the past, particularly in cases where both parents have been sleepwalkers, can expect their children to sleepwalk and thus should prepare adequately." Sleepwalking often begins in childhood and generally disappears by adolescence. But sleepwalking may continue into adulthood. It can also start later in life, according to the researchers. Sleep terrors, in which a person screams and is intensely fearful, also begin in childhood. In the new study, Dr. Jacques Montplaisir, of Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, and colleagues examined connections between these ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Night Terrors

Night Owls Run Higher Risk of Health Problems, Study Finds

Posted 1 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 – Night owls are more likely than early risers to develop diabetes and other health problems, even if they get the same amount of sleep. That's the conclusion of a new study that included more than 1,600 people in South Korea, aged 47 to 59, who provided information about their sleep habits and underwent tests to assess their health. "Regardless of lifestyle, people who stayed up late faced a higher risk of developing health problems like diabetes or reduced muscle mass than those who were early risers," Dr. Nan Hee Kim, of Korea University College of Medicine in Ansan, South Korea, said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. "This could be caused by night owls' tendency to have poorer sleep quality and to engage in unhealthy behaviors like smoking, late-night eating and a sedentary lifestyle," Kim added. Of the 1,600 people in the study, 95 were night ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Diabetes, Type 2

'Exploding Head Syndrome' Surprisingly Common Among Young People

Posted 1 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 – Nearly one in five young people suffers from what's called "exploding head syndrome," a new study suggests. People with the syndrome are startled awake from sleep by sudden loud noises – even the sensation of an explosion – that occur in their head, the researchers explained. The syndrome tends to occur when a person is falling asleep. It may be caused by brain cells associated with hearing firing all at once, said study author Brian Sharpless, director of the psychology clinic at Washington State University. "That's why you get these crazy-loud noises that you can't explain, and they're not actual noises in your environment," Sharpless said in a university news release. Sharpless said conventional wisdom holds that exploding head syndrome is a rare condition that occurs primarily in people older than 50. But he had his doubts about that. "I didn't believe ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Sleep Paralysis

Good Sleep Is Key to Good Sex

Posted 18 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 – Women looking to jump-start their sex life may want to spend more time in bed. Sleeping. That's the conclusion of a new study that suggests that each additional hour of sleep increased by 14 percent the likelihood a woman would engage in sexual activity with a partner the next day. "Our study showed that good sleep is important for healthy sexual desire and arousal in women, even when women are psychiatrically and medically healthy," said study author David Kalmbach, a researcher at the University of Michigan Sleep and Circadian Research Laboratory. Kalmbach and several colleagues evaluated 171 women, all college-age, who kept diaries of their sleep for 14 consecutive days and reported whether they engaged in sexual activity the next day. Longer sleep time was linked with greater sexual desire the next day. Women with longer average sleep duration said they ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue

Health Tip: Sleep With Fresh-Smelling Sheets

Posted 13 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Making sure that your bedsheets smell nice may help you drift into a sweeter sleep. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Wash sheets and pillow cases at least once weekly, so they always smell fresh. Have a second set of quality sheets to use when one set is in the wash. Use a laundry detergent that smells pleasant. Wash the mattress cover regularly in hot water. Use an upholstery cleaner to freshen the mattress, or sprinkle baking soda on the mattress, then vacuum. Wash your pillows regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia

Always Sleepy After the Change to Daylight Saving Time?

Posted 9 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 8, 2015 – You lost an hour's sleep overnight Saturday when the clocks moved ahead. But there are a number of things you can do to cope with the switch to daylight saving time, a sleep expert says. "It's well known that a small shift in time can have a large impact on our body clock and our health, and the time change causes sleepiness and fatigue. For a young, healthy individual, a one hour difference shouldn't make that much impact," said Dr. Yosef Krespi. He is director of the Center for Sleep Disorders at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "But the older or younger you are, the more significant the impact. Individuals with pre-existing sleep conditions such as insomnia or sleep apnea will have an even more difficult time adjusting," he said in a hospital news release. Also, research has found that heart attacks, traffic crashes, and workplace accidents increase just ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders

Always Sleepy After the Change to Daylight Saving Time?

Posted 6 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 – You'll lose an hour's sleep overnight Saturday when the clocks spring ahead. But there are a number of things you can do to cope with the switch to daylight saving time, a sleep expert says. "It's well known that a small shift in time can have a large impact on our body clock and our health, and the time change causes sleepiness and fatigue. For a young, healthy individual, a one hour difference shouldn't make that much impact," said Dr. Yosef Krespi. He is director of the Center for Sleep Disorders at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "But the older or younger you are, the more significant the impact. Individuals with pre-existing sleep conditions such as insomnia or sleep apnea will have an even more difficult time adjusting," he said in a hospital news release. Also, research has found that heart attacks, traffic crashes, and workplace accidents increase ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue

Erratic Sleep May Make Teens Hungrier

Posted 5 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 – Night-to-night changes in the amount of sleep teens get may affect how much they eat, a new study suggests. The research included 342 teens, average age 17, who slept an average of 7 hours a night. But after nights when they slept an hour less or more than normal, the teens ate an average of 201 more calories, 6 grams more fat and 32 grams more carbohydrates a day. Also, they were much more likely to have nighttime snacks on school nights and weekends, according to the study. It's scheduled for presentation Thursday at an American Heart Association meeting in Dallas. "According to the data from our study, it's not how long you sleep that matters. It's about day-to-day variations in how long you sleep," study author Fan He, an epidemiologist at Penn State University College of Medicine, said in a heart association news release. One possible explanation for the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia

Just a Half Hour of Lost Sleep Linked Weight Gain

Posted 5 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 – Think twice the next time you don't get as much sleep as you need: A new study suggests that missing just 30 minutes of shuteye during weeknights could boost your weight and disrupt your metabolism. Many people skimp on sleep during the week and try to make up for it on the weekend, wrote study author Shahrad Taheri, a professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in Doha, Qatar. But weekday sleep debt may lead to long-term metabolic disruption, which may promote or exacerbate type 2 diabetes. "Sleep loss is widespread in modern society, but only in the last decade have we realized its metabolic consequences," Taheri said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. "Our findings suggest that avoiding sleep debt could have positive benefits for waistlines and metabolism, and that incorporating sleep into lifestyle interventions for weight loss and ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Diabetes, Type 2

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Insomnia, Narcolepsy, Sleep Apnea, Sleep Paralysis, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Drowsiness, Jet Lag, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder