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Skin Cancer News

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Could a Laser Skin Test Someday Replace Biopsy to Spot Melanoma?

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 – Skin cancer remains the most common cancer for Americans, and invasive biopsies for lesions that could be dangerous melanomas have long been routine. Now, researchers say they've developed a non-invasive test that can spot melanoma skin cancer without a biopsy, according to a new study. Researchers led by Aneta Stefanovska, of Lancaster University in the United Kingdom, say they've used a laser to identify slight differences in blood flow beneath the lesion, which differentiate melanoma from non-cancerous moles. The test, which takes about 30 minutes, was assessed in 55 people with irregular moles. Follow-up biopsies showed that the test was 100 percent accurate in identifying patients with melanoma. "We used our knowledge of blood flow dynamics to pick up on markers which were consistently different in the blood vessels supplying malignant moles and those ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer

Many Parents Aren't Shielding Babies From Sun's Harmful Rays: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Many parents aren't providing their babies with proper sun protection, a new small study finds. University of Miami researchers surveyed 95 parents, most of them black or Hispanic, and found that only about 15 percent knew American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommendations for sun safety in infants. Eighty-three percent of the parents said they regularly seek shade for their babies, but only 43 percent routinely use a hat to shield their baby from the sun, and 40 percent said they routinely dress their babies in long sleeves and pants to protect them from the sun. Twenty-nine percent of parents said they regularly use sunscreen on children younger than 6 months, even though other methods of sun protection are recommended for children that young. The survey also found that one-third of the parents said they often tried to get their baby to "develop tolerance ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

People With Few Moles Apt to Develop Deadlier Skin Cancer: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – People who have many moles are at increased risk for melanoma skin cancer, but people with fewer moles may be more likely to develop a more aggressive form of the disease, a new study suggests. Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer. For the study, researchers analyzed medical records of 281 melanoma patients: 89 had more than 50 moles and 192 had fewer than 50 moles. Patients with fewer moles had thicker, more aggressive melanoma and were more likely to be diagnosed at a later age than those with more moles, according to the study scheduled for presentation Thursday at an American Academy of Dermatology meeting in New York City. Doctors may be more likely to educate patients with a large number of moles about their increased risk of developing melanoma, said study author Dr. Caroline Kim. Kim is director of the pigmented lesion clinic at Beth Israel ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, History - Skin Cancer

Deadly Skin Cancer More Common in Organ Transplant Recipients: Study

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 – People who've received organ transplants may face an increased risk for the deadly skin cancer melanoma, a new study suggests. The researchers said the increased risk may stem from the immune system-suppressing drugs that must be taken to prevent rejection of the new organs. The analysis of data from hundreds of thousands of transplant recipients and melanoma patients in the United States showed that transplant recipients were twice as likely to develop melanoma and three times more likely to die of the disease than people who had not undergone a transplant. The researchers also found that transplant recipients were four times more likely to be diagnosed with melanomas that had already spread to other parts of the body. "We knew that melanoma was more likely in transplant recipients, but we thought it might be a function of intensive screening since they are ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Immunodeficiency, Organ Transplant, Rejection Prophylaxis

Serving in Middle East May Raise Skin Cancer Risk in U.S. Vets

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 – U.S. veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are at increased risk for skin cancer because of long hours spent in the desert sun, a new study suggests. "Our study has identified factors that put veterans at risk for skin cancer, including melanoma, but we need to better understand the 'why' of sun protection in the field," said study author and dermatologist Dr. Jennifer Powers, an assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Factors contributing to this higher risk include long periods of sun exposure in a desert climate, lack of training about the need for sun protection, and limited use of sunscreen and other types of protective gear, she and her colleagues said. The researchers analyzed data from 212 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were asked about sun exposure and protection during their last deployment. Only ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Scientists Spot What Keeps Moles From Becoming Melanomas

Posted 7 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 – A major genetic factor that prevents moles from turning into deadly melanoma skin cancer has been pinpointed by researchers. It's long been known that a mutation in the BRAF gene causes moles to start growing, but it wasn't understood why they stop growing. "The BRAF mutation that stimulates the initial growth of moles also stimulates the production of a tumor suppressor protein, p15, which ultimately acts as a powerful brake on further cell division," study senior author Dr. Todd Ridky, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania, explained in a university news release. "It's this cell division that ultimately allows the transition from a normal mole into melanoma. When mole cells lose the p15 brake, cells can start dividing again and can progress into cancer," he explained. The study was published online recently in the journal ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic

FDA Approves Odomzo (sonidegib) for Locally Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma

Posted 26 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

July 24, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Odomzo (sonidegib) to treat patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma that has recurred following surgery or radiation therapy, or who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. Skin cancer is the most common cancer and basal cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 80 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers. Basal cell carcinoma starts in the top layer of the skin (called the epidermis) and usually develops in areas that have been regularly exposed to the sun and other forms of ultraviolet radiation. According to the National Cancer Institute, the number of new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer appears to be increasing every year. Locally advanced basal cell skin cancer refers to basal cancers that have not spread to other parts of the body, but cannot be curatively treated with local treatments, ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Sonidegib, Odomzo

New Skin Cancer Drug Odomzo Approved by FDA

Posted 26 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 – A new drug to treat the most common form of skin cancer has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Odomzo (sonidegib) was cleared to treat locally advanced basal cell carcinoma in patients who cannot undergo surgery or radiation therapy, or whose skin cancer has returned after surgery or radiation therapy. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, and basal cell carcinoma accounts for about 80 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers. Locally advanced basal cell skin cancer has not spread to other parts of the body, but cannot be cured with surgery or radiation. Odomzo is a once-a-day pill designed to suppress a molecular pathway that is active in basal cell cancers, according to the FDA. The drug's approval was based on a clinical trial that included 66 patients who took 200 milligrams (mg) of Odomzo a day and 128 patients who took 800 mg a ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Sonidegib, Odomzo

Odomzo Approved for Recurring Basal Cell Carcinoma

Posted 26 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 – Odomzo (sonidegib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat basal cell carcinoma skin cancer that has returned despite surgery or radiation. The treatment is sanctioned for people who are not candidates for additional surgery or radiation. Basal cell carcinoma accounts for about 80 percent of skin cancers that are not melanoma, a more deadly form of the disease. Basal cell starts in the top layer of skin, usually in areas that are most exposed to the sun, the agency said Friday in a news release. The once-daily pill is designed to inhibit a process that promotes the growth of cancerous lesions. The drug's label includes a boxed warning that it may cause death or severe birth defects in a growing fetus. Women who may become pregnant should verify pregnancy status before taking the drug. And both males and females who take Odomzo are ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Sonidegib, Odomzo

U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 – Soaring costs for cancer drugs are hurting patient care in the United States, a group of top oncologists claim. "High cancer-drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. Tefferi and his colleagues made a number of recommendations on how to address the problem in a commentary published July 23 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices is one of the suggestions the team of 118 leading cancer experts offered as a possible solution. Along with their recommendations, the group also expressed support for a patient-based grassroots movement on change.org that is demanding action on the issue. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Accutane, Prostate Cancer, Medroxyprogesterone, Tamoxifen, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Tretinoin, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Rituxan, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer

New Dumb-But-Deadly Trend: Sunburn 'Art'

Posted 16 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 – Sunburns are painful and potentially cancer-causing, but that hasn't stopped them from becoming an increasingly popular means of artistic expression. Experts are now speaking out against "sunburn art," a new social media trend in which people use stencils or strategically applied sunblock to create a do-it-yourself temporary sunburn tattoo on their bodies. Participants then take pictures of their creations and post them on sites such as Twitter and Facebook. The trend is worrisome enough that the Skin Cancer Foundation has issued an official position on sunburn art, warning of the health risks associated with tanned or sunburned skin. "Sunburns cause DNA damage to the skin, accelerate skin aging, and increase your lifetime skin cancer risk," the statement reads. "In fact, sustaining five or more sunburns in youth increases lifetime melanoma risk by 80 percent. ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Indoor Tanning Rates Decline As Cancer Warnings Mount

Posted 1 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 – Heeding warnings about increased cancer risks, a growing number of American adults are saying no to indoor tanning, a new government analysis suggests. The percentage of adults who frequented indoor tanning salons dropped from 5.5 percent in 2010 to slightly over 4 percent in 2013, according to results of the National Health Interview Survey, a poll of more than 59,000 adults. "Roughly 2 million fewer adults are engaging in indoor tanning, which is definitely encouraging, given the associated health risks," noted study author Gery Guy Jr., a health economist with the division of cancer prevention and control at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "The bad news is that even with this reduction, there's still about 10 million adults who continue to indoor tan, which clearly indicates that more efforts are needed to get the message across that ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Graphic Warnings May Work Best to Keep Women From Tanning Beds

Posted 11 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 11, 2015 – Disturbing images of skin cancer are more likely to make young women reconsider indoor tanning than the text-only warnings currently required by U.S. regulators, a new study suggests. According to a team at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., nearly 30 percent of young, white women in the United States use indoor tanning each year, and half of them use indoor tanning 10 times or more a year. "In terms of a public health issue, indoor tanning is a perfect storm – young people, primarily women, indoor tan, which raises their risk of potentially deadly skin cancer. Yet, there are few prevention efforts targeting young adult women," lead researcher Darren Mays, an assistant professor of oncology at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a center news release. Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires indoor ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Photoaging of the Skin, Dermatoheliosis, History - Skin Cancer

Online Searches for 'Skin Cancer' Go Up in Summer

Posted 10 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 10, 2015 – When summer hits the United States and sunseekers mobilize, online searches for "skin cancer" rise, a new study shows. However, it's not clear if the higher search rates mean more cancers are being detected early, said researchers reporting online June 10 in JAMA Dermatology. Researchers led by Dr. Kyle Amber, of MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn, Ill., tracked Google searches for the terms "skin cancer" and "melanoma" in the United States between 2010 and 2014. They found a spike in these types of Web searches during the summer, and that summertime bump remained relatively stable over the entire study period, the team said. Nevada had the highest number of searches for skin cancer, while Pennsylvania had the highest number of searches for melanoma, Amber's group said. The finding might be of use in the war against UV ray exposure and related skin cancers, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Health Tip: Protect Against Skin Cancer

Posted 9 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- A routine regimen of protection can help prevent you from getting skin cancer. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Cover all exposed skin with a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF of at least 30 every day, even when cold or cloudy. Make sure you use enough sunscreen. Be sure to cover the tops of your ears and feet, the back of your neck and, if balding, the top of your head. Stay in the shade between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun is strongest. Wear sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. Be particularly careful around water and snow, since reflection can make the sun's rays more intense. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

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