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Rapamune Blog

Grapefruit Juice May Give Boost to Cancer Treatment: Study

Posted 7 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 – In a small study of patients with incurable cancer, drinking 8 ounces of grapefruit juice a day boosted the effect of a drug they were given during the study. Although some participants had a response, tumors did not disappear after using the drug, which is mostly used to treat conditions unrelated to cancer. The study's main finding was that grapefruit juice might allow treatment using smaller drug dosages, therefore reducing side effects and perhaps costs. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is an immunosuppressant and not approved as a cancer drug. Its primary use is to prevent rejection after kidney transplants. It is also used as a treatment for psoriasis, the researchers noted. Some early studies suggest that sirolimus may have tumor-fighting effects. Derivatives of the drug are used in kidney cancer and breast cancer. The drug, however, has what is called poor ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Sirolimus, Rapamune

Organ Transplant Drug Might Treat Rapid-Aging Disease in Kids

Posted 30 Jun 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 29 – A drug currently used to fight rejection in organ transplant recipients may also reverse DNA cell damage in children with a rare, deadly disorder that leaves them old long before their time, a new study suggests. Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and several universities and hospitals used the antibiotic rapamycin on skin cells taken from children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), which typically kills sufferers during their teenage years. About 100 cases of progeria have been documented since the disease was discovered at the turn of the 20th century. Rapamycin appeared to heighten the cells' ability to clear out a toxic protein called progerin, which causes children with progeria to develop skin and joint problems as well as advanced cardiovascular disease that quickly proves fatal. Progerin is present in small amounts in ... Read more

Related support groups: Sirolimus, Rapamune

Transplant Drug May Fight Rare Lung Disorder

Posted 17 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 16 – An already approved transplant-rejection drug is the first treatment to show a benefit for women with a rare lung disease that has had no cure or, until now, even a treatment. The drug, sirolimus (Rapamycin), improved both lung function and quality of life in women with lymphangioleiomyomatosis, or LAM, according to a study published online March 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine. "To have a therapy for this disease is rare and special," said the study's lead author, Dr. Francis X. McCormack, a professor and director of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at the University of Cincinnati and scientific director of the LAM Foundation in Cincinnati, which helped fund the trial and also recruited participants. LAM is characterized by progressive loss of lung function from the invasion of abnormal muscle tissue that obstructs airways. According to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sirolimus, Rapamune

FDA Medwatch Alert: Rapamune (sirolimus)

Posted 20 Feb 2003 by Drugs.com

Wyeth, in cooperation with FDA, notified healthcare professionals of post-marketing reports of bronchial anastomotic dehiscence, including fatal cases, in lung transplant patients treated with Rapamune in combination with tacrolimus and corticosteroids. The safety and efficacy of Rapamune as immunosuppressive therapy has not been established in lung transplant patients.[February 2003 Letter - Wyeth] PDF Format Read more

Related support groups: Rapamune

FDA Medwatch Alert: Rapamune (sirolimus)

Posted 24 Apr 2002 by Drugs.com

FDA notified healthcare professionals of a "Dear Health Care Provider" letter issued April 24, 2002 by Wyeth, sent to members of the American Society of Transplantation and The American Society of Transplant Surgeons. The letter informs clinicians of the risk of hepatic artery thrombosis, graft loss, and death associated with the use of Rapamune (sirolimus) in de novo liver transplantation.[April 25, 2002 Letter - Wyeth] Read more

Related support groups: Rapamune

FDA Medwatch Alert: Immunosuppressant Drugs: Required Labeling Changes

Posted 14 Jul 2009 by Drugs.com

Sirolimus (marketed as Rapamune), Cyclosporine (marketed as Sandimmune and generics), Cyclosporine modified (marketed as Neoral and generics), Mycophenolate mofetil (marketed as Cellcept and generics), Mycophenolic acid (marketed as Myfortic)   The FDA is requiring the makers of certain immunosuppressant drugs to update their labeling to reflect that immunosuppressed patients are at increased risk for opportunistic infections, such as activation of latent viral infections, including BK virus-associated nephropathy. These immunosuppressant drugs are used to protect against the rejection of certain organ transplants. The association of BK virus-associated nephropathy has previously been reported for another immunosuppressant drug, tacrolimus (marketed as Prograf). Monitoring for this serious risk and early intervention by the health care provider is critical. Adjustments in ... Read more

Related support groups: CellCept, Myfortic, Gengraf, Rapamune

FDA Medwatch Alert: Sirolimus (marketed as Rapamune)

Posted 11 Jun 2009 by Drugs.com

FDA notified healthcare professionals of clinical trial data that suggest increased mortality in stable liver transplant patients after conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based immunosuppressive regimen to sirolimus (Rapamune). The trial was conducted by sirolimus manufacturer, Wyeth. The Agency will continue to examine the data on mortality and other adverse events in this study, and will make further recommendations, as appropriate. The FDA is determining whether a labeling change for sirolimus is needed. In the interim, physicians should continue to use the drug’s professional labeling as a guide to therapy. See the FDA Healthcare Professional Information sheet for current FDA recommendations. [06/11/2009 - Healthcare Professional Information Sheet - FDA] Read more

Related support groups: Rapamune

Drug Shows Promise Against Childhood Epilepsy

Posted 15 Jun 2009 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 15 – A drug commonly used to prevent rejection in organ transplant patients may be effective against childhood epilepsy, animal studies suggest. The drug, rapamycin (also known as sirolimus), appears to block seizures in mice with cortical dysplasia, a brain malformation that is a common cause of childhood epilepsy and a frequent reason for pediatric epilepsy surgery, said Gabriella D'Arcangelo, an associate professor in the department of cell biology and neuroscience at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. "The surgery is not without risks, and while it may help control the seizures, it does not work in all cases," D'Arcangelo said in a news release from the university. "Clearly, there is a pressing need to come up with new strategies for treatment." In the study, published online in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms, researchers tested rapamycin, a widely ... Read more

Related support groups: Epilepsy, Rapamune

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Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis

Rapamune Patient Information at Drugs.com