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Pulmonary Embolism Blog

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FDA Approves Eliquis (apixaban) for the Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

Thursday, August 21, 2014 - Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) and Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Eliquis for the treatment of DVT and PE, and for the reduction in the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial therapy. Combined, DVT and PE are known as VTE. It is estimated that every year, approximately 900,000 Americans are affected by DVT and PE. “We are pleased that Eliquis is now available as an effective treatment option for DVT and PE,” said Douglas Manion, M.D., Head of Specialty Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “Eliquis offers oral dosing, no routine coagulation testing, and does not require the use of a parenteral anticoagulant or bridging during initiation.” “DVT, which may lead to PE, can be a serious medical condition, with PE requiring immediate med ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Eliquis, Venous Thromboembolism, Apixaban

FDA Medwatch Alert: Coumadin (warfarin sodium) for Injection by Bristol-Myers Squibb: Recall - Particulate Matter

Posted 3 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

ISSUE:  Bristol-Myers Squibb Company issued a voluntary recall of six lots of Coumadin for Injection, 5 mg single-use vials in the U.S. Visible particulate matter was found in a small number of Coumadin for Injection unreleased samples. Injected particulate metallic and non-metallic cellulose material can cause serious and potentially fatal adverse reactions such as embolization. Allergic reactions to the foreign material could also occur. To date, there have been no product complaints or adverse events reported to Bristol-Myers Squibb related to this issue. Coumadin for Injection 5 mg single-use vials is packaged in cartons of six vials. The affected Coumadin for Injection includes the following six lots distributed to hospitals and pharmacies from November 2011 through January 2014: 201125, 201126, 201127, 201228, 201229, 201230. BACKGROUND: Coumadin for Injection was discontinued in ... Read more

Related support groups: Coumadin, Warfarin, Pulmonary Embolism, Jantoven

Pros, Cons to Dissolving Lung Clots: Study

Posted 17 Jun 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 17, 2014 – Drugs used to break up blood clots in the lungs may lower the risk of death, but they also increase the risk of bleeding, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 16 trials involving use of clot-busting drugs called thrombolytics to treat life-threatening clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolism). Despite the drugs' apparent life-saving benefits, the risk of major bleeding, particularly in the brain, remains a concern, experts say. "The study advances our understanding, but is not enough to provide a definitive recommendation for use in all patients," said Dr. Joshua Beckman, director of the cardiovascular fellowship program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who was not involved in the study. The evidence suggests that clot-busting therapy has merit but needs more study to refine the method by which it is given and to whom, added Beckman. What's ... Read more

Related support groups: Xarelto, Pradaxa, Pulmonary Embolism, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Fondaparinux, Activase, Dabigatran, Streptokinase, Heparin Sodium, Cathflo Activase, Streptase, Alteplase, Urokinase, Kinlytic, Arixtra 5 mg/dose, Abbokinase, Hep-Pak CVC

FDA Approves Pradaxa for Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism

Posted 7 Apr 2014 by Drugs.com

Ridgefield, CT, April 7, 2014 – Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for five to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated. DVT and PE are collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). There are an estimated 900,000 DVT and PE events per year in the U.S., approximately one-third of which result in death from PE. “Venous thromboembolism is the third most common cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction and stroke. About one-third of patients with a DVT or PE will suffer a recurrence within 10 years,” said Samuel Z. Goldhaber, M.D., Director of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pradaxa, Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Dabigatran

Asthma Linked to Increased Risk of Dangerous Lung Blockage

Posted 20 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19 – People with asthma are at increased risk for the dangerous, sometimes deadly lung condition called pulmonary embolism, according to new research. A pulmonary embolism refers to blockage of a lung artery. The blockage is usually caused by a blood clot that travels to the lungs after breaking free from a vein in the leg. These clots that form in the legs are commonly known as deep vein thrombosis. The study included about 650 people with asthma, aged 18 to 88, in the Netherlands. Compared to the general population, people with severe asthma had a nearly nine times greater risk of pulmonary embolism, while those with mild to moderate asthma had a 3.5-times increased risk, the investigators found. The researchers also found that asthma medications called oral corticosteroids are a potential risk factor for pulmonary embolism, according to the study, which was published ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Pulmonary Embolism

Xarelto's Approval Expanded

Posted 5 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 5 – Approval of the anti-clotting drug Xarelto (rivaroxaban) has been expanded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to include treating deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism. DVT occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep in the body. If a clot breaks away and travels to an artery in the lungs, it becomes a potentially deadly condition called a pulmonary embolism. Xarelto was approved last year to treat clots stemming from knee or hip replacement and to lessen the risk of stroke in people with a form of abnormal heart rhythm called non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The drug's newest approvals were given based on clinical studies involving 9,478 people, the FDA said in a news release. As with other anti-clotting drugs, bleeding is the most common side effect. Xarelto is produced by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, based in Raritan, N.J. More information The FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Xarelto, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Rivaroxaban

FDA Expands Use of Xarelto to Treat, Reduce Recurrence of Blood Clots

Posted 2 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

November 2, 2012 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Xarelto (rivaroxaban) to include treating deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial treatment. Blood clots occur when blood thickens and clumps together. DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein blood clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. When a blood clot in a deep vein breaks off and travels to an artery in the lungs and blocks blood flow, it results in a potentially deadly condition called PE. Xarelto is already FDA-approved to reduce the risk of DVTs and PEs from occurring after knee or hip replacement surgery (July 2011), and to reduce the risk of stroke in people who have a type of abnormal heart rhythm called non-valvular atrial fibrillation (November 2011). The FDA reviewed ... Read more

Related support groups: Xarelto, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Rivaroxaban, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after General Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Hip Replacement Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Orthopedic Surgery

Post-Flight Fainting May Signal Dangerous Blood Clot: Study

Posted 22 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 22 – People who faint shortly after air travel could have a potentially fatal blockage in their lung, known as a pulmonary embolism, a new study indicates. A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a clot formed in the deep veins of the leg that migrates to the lung. The new study also found that fainting due to a pulmonary embolism is linked to saddle embolism, a larger and more serious form of the condition. The findings were to be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), in Atlanta. "Fainting may be an atypical symptom of [pulmonary embolism], but fainting associated with recent air travel is a dangerous combination," said study author, Dr. Robert Rifenburg, at the Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago, in an ACCP news release. He cautioned that air travelers diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism after fainting are likely to have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism

Rheumatoid Arthritis May Be Linked to More Blood Clots

Posted 2 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 – New research confirms suspicions that people with rheumatoid arthritis are at somewhat higher risk of developing blood clots in their veins in the decade after diagnosis. The risk appears to be greater during hospitalization, as it is within the general population, the Swedish researchers added. The study, published in the Oct. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, doesn't prove that rheumatoid arthritis directly increases the likelihood of blood clots. Still, it provides "strong evidence that there is a connection between rheumatoid arthritis and blood clots, and that something related to rheumatoid arthritis – inflammation, treatment, other factors – is increasing the risk of blood clots," said study author Dr. Marie Holmqvist, a postdoctoral researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Rheumatoid arthritis is different from ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Pulmonary Embolism, Venous Thromboembolism

Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study

Posted 5 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 5 – Infections, especially among older adults, may increase the risk of developing potentially dangerous blood clots, a new study suggests. The clots are called venous thromboembolisms, and include the deep vein thromboses (DVTs) that typically begin in the legs. However, DVTs can also travel to the lungs where they form potentially deadly pulmonary embolisms. DVTs have been linked to prolonged sitting, gaining the nickname "economy-class syndrome" after cases of passengers developing them on long-haul flights. But, the new study finds that if an older adult suffers an infection (for example, a urinary, skin or respiratory infection) after a stay in a hospital or nursing home, the risk of developing a venous thromboembolism can rise nearly sevenfold. In people who develop infections at home, the researchers found a threefold increased risk of a clot within 90 days. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis

Autoimmune Woes May Raise Risk for Lung Clots

Posted 27 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 25 – Patients hospitalized for autoimmune disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease, may be at greater risk for a life-threatening pulmonary embolism, a clot in a main artery of the lung, a new study finds. Reporting online Nov. 25 in The Lancet, researchers warned that steps should be taken to prevent this condition among patients admitted to the hospital for autoimmune diseases. In conducting the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 500,000 patients admitted to the hospital in Sweden for one of 33 autoimmune diseases, which can also include Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and chronic rheumatic heart disease. The team, led by Dr. Bengt Zoller of Malmo University Hospital in Sweden, found the overall risk of pulmonary embolism in the 12 months following hospitalization to be six times higher for patients with autoimmune diseases than for ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Crohn's Disease, Hashimoto's Disease, Pulmonary Embolism, Vasculitis, Graves' Disease, Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis, Rheumatic Heart Disease, Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis, Polyarteritis

Too Much Sitting May Double Women's Risk of Blood Clots

Posted 5 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 5 – Women who sit for long periods of time on a regular basis have a two- to threefold increased risk of developing a potentially deadly blood clot in their lungs, a new study finds. The researchers said their study is the first to prove that an inactive lifestyle increases the risk of developing a pulmonary embolism, which occurs when part or all of a blood clot that forms in the deep veins of the legs travels through the bloodstream to the lungs. Sudden shortness of breath, severe chest pain and coughing that may produce blood are among the symptoms of pulmonary embolism, in addition to excessive sweating, fainting and weak pulse. The new study included 69,950 female nurses who were followed for 18 years and every two years provided details about their lifestyle habits. Women who spent most of their time sitting (more than 41 hours a week outside of work) were two times ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism

Scan Technology Tied to Overtreatment of Clots in Lungs

Posted 9 May 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 9 – Overdiagnosis and overtreatment of pulmonary embolism is a problem in the United States due to the large increase in the use of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), a new study suggests. A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life-threatening blood clot in the lungs. CTPA was introduced in 1998 to improve detection of PE and its use has grown rapidly, according to background information in the study by Boston University School of Medicine researchers. The investigators compared data about PE in U.S. adults before (1993-1998) and after (1998-2006) CTPA was introduced, and found that the incidence of PE increased 81 percent after CTPA became available, from 62.1 to 112.3 per 100,000 people. Deaths from PE decreased during both time periods, but more so before (8 percent reduction, from 13.4 to 12.3 per 100,000), than after the introduction of CTPA (3 ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism

Docs Should Assess Lung Clot Risk Before Ordering Scan

Posted 15 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 15 – CT angiography might not be necessary in many patients suspected of having a blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism), and a risk analysis can identify those most likely to require the procedure, a new study suggests. Pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs when a blood clot, usually from the leg, moves through the bloodstream and lodges in an artery in the lung. The condition can be fatal, so prompt diagnosis is essential. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity, CT angiography has become a preferred method of diagnosing PE. However, there are growing concerns about costs and patient radiation exposure, along with risks associated with contrast agents used in the procedure. For this study, researchers reviewed the medical records to assess the PE risk factors of 2,003 patients who underwent CT angiography for possible PE between July 2004 and February 2006. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism - First Event, Pulmonary Embolism, Pulmonary Embolism - Recurrent Event

Clot Dissolver Doesn't Boost Survival in Cardiac Arrest Patients

Posted 17 Dec 2008 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17 – German doctors thought that giving the clot-dissolving drug tenecteplase (TKNase) to people with sudden cardiac arrest would improve survival. Unfortunately, the drug, a form of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), didn't work as hoped in a trial, but they haven't given up on the idea. "In specific situations, those patients with pulmonary embolism, use of this thrombolytic agent can stabilize the patient and help the patient survive," said Dr. Bernd W. Böttiger, professor and head of the department of anesthesiology and emergency care medicine at the University of Cologne and lead author of a report in the Dec. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. But pulmonary embolism, a blood clot that blocks a heart artery, is the underlying cause of sudden cardiac arrest only 5 percent to 7 percent of the time, Böttiger said. There was a small improvement in s ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Embolism

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Pulmonary Embolism - First Event, Pulmonary Embolism - Recurrent Event, Pulmonary Thromboembolism

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Xarelto, Pradaxa, heparin, rivaroxaban, Arixtra, Activase, dabigatran, fondaparinux, streptokinase, view more... Heparin Sodium, Streptase, apixaban, alteplase, urokinase, Arixtra 10 mg/dose, Kinlytic, Kabikinase, Abbokinase, Abbokinase Open-Cath, Arixtra 5 mg/dose, Arixtra 7.5 mg/dose