Skip to Content

Join the 'Prevention of Dental Caries' group to help and get support from people like you.

Prevention of Dental Caries News

Health Warning Labels Might Help Parents Skip the Soda Aisle

Posted 14 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2016 – Health warning labels on sugary beverages – similar to those on cigarette packs – might make parents less likely to buy such beverages for their kids, according to new research. Growing concerns about the health effects of drinking sugar-sweetened beverages, which are linked to weight gain and obesity as well as tooth decay, have triggered efforts to reduce their use by children and adults. In the new study, lead researcher Christina Roberto and her colleagues conducted an online survey of nearly 2,400 parents who had at least one child aged 6 to 11 years. In a simulated online shopping experiment, parents were divided into six groups to "buy" drinks for their kids. One group saw no warning label on the beverages they would buy; another saw a label listing calories. The other four groups saw various warning labels about the potential health effects of sugary ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Oral and Dental Conditions, Weight Loss, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

Talk Therapy to Tackle Fear of the Dentist

Posted 5 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 – Many people are familiar with the fear that can precede a visit to the dentist, but new research shows that talk therapy can help when that anxiety becomes a crippling phobia. In the study, British investigators tried an approach called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a short-term treatment typically involving six to 10 sessions. "CBT works by providing individuals with skills to address their fear," said lead researcher Tim Newton, a professor of psychology at King's College London Dental Institute. After the sessions, which focused on replacing negative thoughts with positive ones, the patients took away a set of skills to help tackle their anxiety, Newton explained. "We discuss with them when we discharge them the fact that their anxiety [about dental visits] will come back, but that they know what to do – don't avoid, take gradual steps and challenge ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Study Suggests Link Between Gum Disease, Breast Cancer Risk

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 – Gum disease might increase the risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women, particularly those who smoke, a new study suggests. Women with gum disease appeared to have a 14 percent overall increased risk for breast cancer, compared to women without gum disease. And that increased risk seemed to jump to more than 30 percent if they also smoked or had smoked in the past 20 years, researchers said. "These findings are useful in providing new insight into what causes breast cancer," said lead author Jo Freudenheim, a professor of epidemiology at the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions in New York. "There is good evidence, though, that good dental care is important in any case and that treatment of periodontal disease is important for the health of the mouth," she said. But more study is needed before there is enough evidence ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Periodontitis, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: If Teeth Are Sensitive

Posted 11 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Loss of enamel often leads sensitive teeth, which may be painful. If your pearly whites are sensitive, the Mayo Clinic says you should avoid: Foods and beverages that are higher in acid, such as soda, and citrus fruits and drinks. Wine and yogurt, which also may be acidic. Brushing and flossing teeth too vigorously. Bleaching your teeth. Using an abrasive toothpaste. Read more

Related support groups: Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Dentistry Without the Drill? New Study Offers Hope

Posted 9 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9, 2015 – Good news for those afraid of the dentist's drill: New research suggests that a "no-drill" approach can halt tooth decay in many cases. An Australian team's seven-year study found that the need for fillings fell 30 to 50 percent if patients used preventive care after the first sign of tooth decay. "It's unnecessary for patients to have fillings because they're not required in many cases of dental decay," study lead author Wendell Evans, an associate professor at the University of Sydney, said in a university news release. The findings highlight "the need for a major shift in the way tooth decay is managed by dentists," he believes. Many people believe that even the smallest sign of tooth decay warrants a filling. But Evans said that the decay does not always progress and often develops more slowly than widely believed. "For example, it takes an average of four ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Know the Risks of Oral Piercing

Posted 4 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- You may think it's attractive or cool to pierce your tongue, but you should be aware of the risks before the procedure. The American Dental Association explains these potential risks: Swelling that could impair breathing. Cracking a tooth from biting down on a piercing. Severe infection or pain. Allergic reaction. Nerve damage. Excessive drooling. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Another Downside to Diabetes: Tooth Loss

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 – The physical toll associated with type 2 diabetes includes tooth loss, a new study finds. The risk of vision problems and amputations for people with diabetes is well-known. Now, research shows diabetics lose twice as many teeth on average as those without the disease. Also, blacks with diabetes have a greater risk of tooth loss as they age, compared with white or Mexican Americans, the study found. "We have more evidence that [poor] oral health is related to diabetes," said lead researcher Bei Wu, a professor of nursing and global health at Duke University in Durham, N.C. Gum disease is a common complication of diabetes. About half of U.S. adults have gum disease, and its prevalence is even higher among diabetics, Wu said. "The ultimate consequence of gum disease is tooth loss," she added. Why diabetes is linked to tooth loss hasn't been clear, Wu said. What ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Sugar-Free Sodas, Candy Can Still Damage Your Teeth

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Even sugar-free sodas, sports drinks and candy can damage your teeth, a new study warns. Australian researchers tested 23 sugar-free and sugar-containing products, including soft drinks and sports drinks, and found that some with acidic additives and low pH levels (a measure of acidity) harm teeth, even if they are sugar-free. "Many people are not aware that while reducing your sugar intake does reduce your risk of dental decay, the chemical mix of acids in some foods and drinks can cause the equally damaging condition of dental erosion," said Eric Reynolds. He is laureate professor and CEO of the Oral Health Cooperative Research Center at Melbourne University. Dental erosion occurs when acid dissolves the tooth's hard tissues. "In its early stages erosion strips away the surface layers of tooth enamel. If it progresses to an advanced stage it can expose the ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Oral and Dental Conditions, Weight Loss, Toothache, Gingivitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Are You Flossing Correctly?

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Flossing is an essential part of good dental health. But are you taking all the right steps to protect your mouth? The American Dental Association says: Flossing before or after brushing doesn't really make a difference. What's most important is to pick the time of day that works best for you. Floss your child's teeth as soon as two teeth touch. Parents should supervise flossing until the child is about 10 years old, or later if the child requires additional supervision. Floss thoroughly but gently. While you shouldn't feel pain, some slight discomfort is normal. Choose the tool that works best for you, whether it's using actual floss or a water flosser. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Should I See My Dentist?

Posted 18 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Regular dental checkups may spot problems before they become serious, but there are signs you should visit your dentist sooner than your next scheduled exam. The American Dental Association cites these warning signs: You have pain or swelling in the mouth, face or neck; jaw pain; or bleeding or swelling of the gums. It's become difficult for you to chew or swallow. Your mouth is constantly dry. You notice sores or spots inside your mouth. Read more

Related support groups: Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Spot the Warning Signs of a Cavity

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most any dentist should be able to spot a cavity, but do you know the warning signs if you're between checkups? The American Dental Association mentions these symptoms of a cavity: Having pain in your tooth. Getting food caught in your tooth. Feeling a rough edge against your tongue. Having a sensitivity to foods that are cold or sweet. Read more

Related support groups: Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Protect Baby's Teeth From Tooth Decay

Posted 2 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Tooth decay stemming from sugary drinks stored in baby's bottle can lead to a host of long-term dental problems. The American Dental Association suggests how to protect baby's teeth: Never place soft drinks, juice or sugared water in a baby's bottle. Only use the bottle for breast milk or formula. Never let baby take a bottle to bed. Don't put baby's spoon or pacifier in your mouth. This will prevent transferring germs and bacteria. Never dip a child's pacifier in anything sweet. Wipe your child's gums with a damp, clean cloth after feedings. When teeth erupt and up until age 3, brush gently with a toothbrush and a rice grain-sized portion of fluoride toothpaste. From ages 3 to 6, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Continue supervising your child's tooth brushing until about age 6, when the child can reliably spit out toothpaste. Switch to a regular cup by your child's ... Read more

Related support groups: Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

Secondhand Smoke in Infancy May Harm Kids' Teeth

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Want your baby to grow into a tot with a cavity-free smile? Don't smoke when he or she is around. Children exposed to secondhand smoke at 4 months of age may be at risk for tooth decay by age 3, Japanese researchers report. Those children were roughly twice as likely to have cavities as kids whose parents didn't smoke. A mother's tobacco use during pregnancy was not a factor, the researchers added. "Secondhand smoke is one of the major public health problems still unsolved," said lead researcher Dr. Koji Kawakami, chairman of pharmacoepidemiology and clinical research management at Kyoto University. Exposure to secondhand smoke is widespread, affecting four out of 10 kids around the world, he said. "In our study, more than half of children had family members who smoked, and most smokers were their fathers," Kawakami said. He emphasized that this study only ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Oral and Dental Conditions, Smoking Cessation, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Moistening a Dry Mouth

Posted 29 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Dry mouth is a common complaint among seniors, and lack of saliva can increase the risk of cavities and other dental problems. The American Dental Association advises: Use a mouthwash, spray or over-the-counter oral moisturizer. Suck on a sugar-free lozenge or chew sugar-free gum. Talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication if that's what's causing dry mouth. Drink water frequently throughout the day. Run a humidifier at home. Restrict foods and beverages that can irritate a dry mouth, such as fruit juices high in acid, coffee, alcohol and carbonated drinks. Read more

Related support groups: Xerostomia, Oral and Dental Conditions, Aphthous Ulcer, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Visiting the Dentist

Posted 25 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Seniors need to see a dentist regularly for a checkup and cleaning. And it's a good idea to bring some information to share with your dentist. The American Dental Association advises that you bring: A written list of your over-the-counter and prescription medications, supplements, herbs and vitamins. A complete list of allergies and other medical conditions. The names and contact info of all of healthcare providers. Information for an emergency contact, in case of a serious medical problem. Insurance cards for any dental plan or Medicare. Any partials or dentures, even if you don't wear them. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Oral and Dental Conditions

Related Drug Support Groups

fluoride, Biotene, Prevident, Control Rx, ACT Fluoride Rinse, sodium fluoride, Prevident 5000 Plus, SF 5000 Plus, Ethedent, view more... Perio Med, Fluoridex, Gel-Kam, Prevident 5000 Dry Mouth, DentiCare Pro-Rinse, DentiCare Pro-Gel, DentiCare Pro-Foam, ControlRx Toothpaste, Darby, Acclean Plus, Ludent, Neutragard Advanced, Neutragard, Renaf, Pharmaflur 1.1, Denti-Care Denti-Foam, Denti-Care Denti-Pro, Clinpro 5000, Flor-Opal Gel, Epiflur, Denti-Care Denti-Rinse, OrthoWash, Neutra Maxx, Sorbet Neutral, SF Gel, Purelife APF, Pro-Den Rx, Sorbet Rinse, Ultra Control, Zooby, Zap Neutral, Zap APF, Prevident Mouthwash, PreviDent Gel, Pharmaflur, Ionite R, Ionite H, Gelato X, Oral-B Fluorinse, Ortho Guard, Phos-Flur Gel, Phocal PHN, PCXX Foam, Fluorishield, Fluoritab, APF Gel, Omnii Gel, Oral B Anti-Cavity, Neutracare Gel, Nafrinse Solution, Fluorinse, Denta 5000 Plus, Liqui-Flur, Prevident Dental Rinse, Gel-Kam Dentinbloc, Phosphate Fluoride, Stop, Stanimax Gel, Phos-Flur, Perfect Choice, Omni-Med, Acid Phos Fluor Rinse, Thera-Flur-N, Stanimax Perio Rinse, Prevident 500 Plus Boost, Dentagel, Fluorabon, Fluor-A-Day, Ethedent Chewable, Altaflor, Fluorodex, Flura-Drops, Nafrinse, Flura-Tab, Flura-Loz, NaFrinse Weekly, NaFrinse Daily / Neutral, Fluorigard, Fluoridex Whitening, Omnii Gel Just For Kids, Luride, Karidium, NaFrinse Daily / Acidulated, Tandem Perio Rinse, Lozi-Flur, Pediaflor Drops