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Orthopedic Surgery News

Weight-Loss Surgery Often Brings Less Painful Joints: Study

Posted 4 Nov 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 – Aching knee and hip joints may hurt less after successful weight-loss surgery, a new study suggests. "In particular, walking is easier, which impacts patients' ability to adopt a more physically active lifestyle," lead researcher Wendy King said in a news release from the ObesityWeek meeting. Weight-loss surgery isn't a "magic bullet" for joint pain for every patient, however. "Some patients continue to have significant pain and disability" even after the operation, said King, who is an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health. King's team was to present the findings Wednesday at the ObesityWeek meeting in Los Angeles, which is hosted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and The Obesity Society. In the study, the researchers tracked outcomes for more than 2,200 obese people, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

The Long and (Financial) Short of Fixing Leg Length Differences

Posted 23 Oct 2015 by

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 – The type of surgery used to correct significant leg length differences in children can affect the patient's income as an adult, a new study suggests. Typically, a child whose legs are different lengths has the longer leg shortened, which results in a shorter height as an adult. Lengthening the shorter leg is less common because it involves numerous surgeries and higher risk of complications, the researchers explained. But they also found that each extra inch of adult height was associated with an average increase of $1,193 in annual income, using 2010 inflation-adjusted figures. For men, each extra inch of height from 64 inches to 70 inches meant $1,660 more income per year, and each extra inch in height from 70 inches to 76 inches meant $788 more income per year. For women, each extra inch of height from 59 inches to 70 inches meant $1,186 more income per year, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Common Shoulder Injury Heals Well Without Surgery: Study

Posted 22 Oct 2015 by

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 – A common shoulder injury that is usually repaired with surgery can heal just as well with nonsurgical treatment, a new study suggests. And, the researchers added, those who decide against surgery for a dislocated shoulder joint develop fewer complications and get back to work sooner. But, surgery patients seem more satisfied with the appearance of their shoulder after treatment. Found at the top of the shoulder between the collarbone and the shoulder blade, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is often injured during sports. It can also be dislocated in a fall or car accident. People with a minor injury can wear a sling and undergo physical therapy. More severe dislocations are often treated with surgery involving a plate and screws, according to the researchers. "For severe AC joint dislocations, surgery is the common practice but there's not much evidence to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Knee Replacement Brings Less Pain, Better Function

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Total knee replacement usually results in greater pain relief and better joint function after a year than nonsurgical arthritis treatment, researchers report. But baby boomers shouldn't automatically rule out physical therapy for moderate to severe knee arthritis, the authors of the new study said. "There are nearly 700,000 knee replacements done in the United States each year, but evidence of their benefit has been lacking," said lead author Soren Thorgaard Skou, a researcher in the musculoskeletal function and physiotherapy unit at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense. By 2010, knee replacement had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults 45 and over in the United States, according to data from the U.S. National Hospital Discharge Survey. Average age of the recipients was 66. For the study, Skou's team randomly assigned 100 patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Surgery, Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Higher-Volume Rehab Centers Better for Hip Fracture Recovery: Study

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Seniors who break a hip receive the best care in skilled nursing facilities with the most experience handling such fractures, a new study suggests. Twenty-five cases a year was the magic number, according to lead author Pedro Gozalo, associate professor of health services, policy and practice at the School of Public Health at Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues. "Even adjusting for a long list of patient risk factors and for important facility characteristics, facilities that had cared for more than two dozen hip fracture patients in the last 12 months were more than twice as likely to successfully discharge patients in a timely manner compared to facilities that had three or less hip fracture admissions," Gozalo said in a university news release. The researchers analyzed the medical records of more than 512,000 patients with broken hips, aged 75 ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Obesity Won't Affect Joint Surgery Safety, Study Finds

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Obese and overweight people who have joint replacement surgeries are less likely to need blood transfusions and are no more likely to face complications than normal weight patients, a new analysis finds. "It's a very complex issue," said study co-author Dr. Nolan Wessell, an orthopaedic surgery resident at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. "And this finding is somewhat surprising. "But it could just be that larger patients have a larger total blood value," he added. "And therefore lose a lower percentage of their blood than smaller patients during surgery. Essentially, it may be that they have a larger reserve in their tank, and can afford to lose a bit more blood without needing a transfusion. We don't know. But at least conceptually that makes sense." Still, senior study author Dr. Craig Silverton, vice chairman of orthopaedics at Henry Ford, cautioned that more ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Hip-Fracture Surgery Risk Not Just Due to Age, Study Finds

Posted 15 Sep 2015 by

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 – People who need surgery for a broken hip face a higher risk of serious complications and death than those who undergo an elective hip replacement – and the disparity is not explained by fracture sufferers' older age or poorer health, a new study finds. Doctors have long known that hip-fracture surgery is a riskier procedure than elective hip replacements, which are done to treat severe arthritis. "Everyone has recognized that hip-fracture patients are having bad outcomes," said Dr. P.J. Devereaux, the senior researcher on the new study and a professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. "It's been assumed that it's because they're older and sicker." But his team's study, published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggests that is not the whole story. "This raises the hope that we don't have to just accept those ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

More Americans Getting Knees Replaced, And at Younger Ages

Posted 2 Sep 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 – Aging baby boomers are getting bum knees replaced at a greater rate, and at a younger age, than ever before, a new U.S. study confirms. The data, from the National Hospital Discharge Survey, shows that between 2000 and 2010, more than 5.2 million total knee replacements were performed in the United States. By 2010, the operation had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults aged 45 and over. The rate at which middle-aged and older Americans got their knees replaced almost doubled over the years covered by the study, for men and women, the researchers found. People aren't putting off the procedure for as long, either. In 2000, the average knee replacement patient was about 69 years old, but by 2010 that age had dropped to just over 66, the findings showed. One expert said there's been a change in doctors' and patients' attitudes toward the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Tuning Into Your Favorite Music May Boost Post-Op Recovery

Posted 12 Aug 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 – Mozart, Madonna or Eminem: Whatever your taste, music may help you recover from a surgery, according to a new review of data on the subject. "More than 51 million operations are performed every year in the U.S.," lead author Dr. Catherine Meads, of Brunel University in the United Kingdom, said in a news release from The Lancet, which published the findings Aug. 12. "Music is a non-invasive, safe, cheap intervention that should be available to everyone undergoing surgery," she said. "Patients should be allowed to choose the type of music they would like to hear to maximize the benefit to their well-being." The only caveat: "Care needs to be taken that music does not interfere with the medical team's communication," Meads said. In their research, her team reviewed data from 72 studies that included nearly 7,000 patients. The investigators found that listening ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

More Teen Athletes Undergoing Tommy John Elbow Surgery: Study

Posted 14 Jul 2015 by

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 – Most Tommy John surgeries to fix elbows torn in sports-related injuries are being performed on teenagers, especially baseball pitchers, and the numbers are rising every year, a new study reports. Tommy John surgery fixes a torn ulnar collateral ligament, or UCL. The UCL is located on the inside of the elbow and connects the bone of the upper arm to a bone in the forearm. Teens between ages 15 and 19 accounted for nearly 60 percent of all Tommy John surgeries performed in the United States between 2007 and 2011, the study said. Kids these days are playing sports year-round, and often specializing in a single sport to improve their chances of getting a scholarship or making the big leagues, said lead author Dr. Brandon Erickson, an orthopedic surgery resident at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. "The more pitches kids throw and the faster they throw ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

When New Doctors 'Train' During Surgery, Risks Don't Rise: Study

Posted 6 Jul 2015 by

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 – People undergoing brain or spine surgery are at no greater risk if doctors-in-training – called residents – assist during the operation, a new study suggests. Researchers found that residents are supervised and their assistance doesn't increase the risk for complications or death. "Patients often ask whether a resident is going to be involved in their case, and they're usually not looking to have more residents involved," Dr. Mohamad Bydon, a resident in neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, said in a hospital news release. "Some people have a fear of being treated in a hospital that trains doctors." To see if there was any basis for the concern, the researchers looked at results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries performed between 2006 and 2012. The information was from the database of the American College of Surgeons National ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital

Using Same Hospital for Complications After Surgery Lowers Death Risk: Study

Posted 18 Jun 2015 by

THURSDAY, June 18, 2015 – Surgery patients who suffer complications after discharge from a hospital are more likely to die if they're readmitted to a different hospital than where they had their original operation, a new study finds. University of Utah researchers reviewed information on millions of Medicare patients who underwent one of 12 major surgical procedures between 2001 and 2011. They found that up to one-fifth of the patients were readmitted to a hospital within 30 days due to complications. Up to 83 percent of patients with complications were readmitted to the same hospital where they had their initial surgery. Overall, readmission to the same hospital was associated with a 26 percent lower risk of death within 90 days, the study revealed. For specific types of surgeries, the risk of death associated with readmission to the same hospital ranged from 44 percent lower for ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Appendectomy, Neurosurgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Spleen Removal, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Ophthalmic Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Study Questions Value of Arthroscopic Knee Surgery for Older Patients

Posted 17 Jun 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 – Arthroscopic surgery to relieve chronic knee pain in middle-aged and older patients is only temporarily effective and might be harmful, a new analysis suggests. Researchers who reviewed 18 studies recommended against the procedure as a treatment for arthritis pain or a torn meniscus – the shock-absorbing cartilage between the knee bones – in older adults. "We found you improve regardless of if you have surgery or nonsurgical treatment," said one of the researchers, Ewa Roos, a professor in the department of sports science and clinical biomechanics at the University of Southern Denmark. Dr. David Teuscher, president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, agrees that for this type of knee pain, arthroscopic surgery has no benefit. In fact, doctors in the U.S. no longer use this procedure to relieve knee pain, he said. "We did the research on this ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Young Athletes With ACL Injuries Often Need Repeat Surgery: Study

Posted 22 May 2015 by

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 – Many young athletes who undergo surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) need a second operation later on, a new study shows. Torn ACLs are widespread among people younger than 21, said researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. "This is the first study to evaluate, on a population level, the percentage of patients under age 21 who had subsequent ACL or non-ACL knee surgery following a primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction," lead investigator Dr. Emily Dodwell, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, said in a hospital news release. Using a New York state database, her team identified 23,912 cases of ACL reconstruction in patients younger than 21. Of these patients, 8 percent needed a second surgery on this ligament, and 14 percent needed another knee surgery that didn't involve their ACL. The median time between surgeries ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Orthopedist Offers Tips for Preventing Shoulder Injuries

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – As the most flexible joint in your body, your shoulder can move and position your arm in many ways. But this flexibility also makes it prone to instability and injury. Shoulder muscles, ligaments and tendons can be injured by sports, household chores and heavy lifting. These injuries sometimes take months to heal and can interfere with everyday tasks, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says. In 2010, about 16 million Americans visited their doctor for a shoulder problem, and more than 2.7 million were diagnosed with sprains and strains of the shoulder and upper arm, according to the academy. "Strengthening and stretching the muscles that support your shoulder joint can keep it stable and restore range of motion to help reduce the risk of injuries," orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brent Ponce, an academy spokesman, said in an academy news release. "If you ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

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