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Orthopedic Surgery News

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 2 days 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted 2 days 5 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. Tommy John surgery is named after the big league pitcher who was the first to undergo the operation more than 40 years ago. Its medical name is ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. The procedure involves replacing the UCL in the medial elbow with a tendon from the same arm or the hamstring area. The researchers found that 83 Major League Baseball pitchers who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow, Surgical Prophylaxis

Spinal Fusion Not Always Necessary for Back Pain, Studies Say

Posted 13 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 – Spinal fusion surgery is too often used to treat lower back pain when a simpler procedure would suffice for many patients, according to a pair of new clinical trials. People suffering from spinal stenosis – pinched nerves caused by a narrowing of the spinal canal – received similar pain relief with fewer complications when doctors performed a simpler spine surgery called decompression, as opposed to a full-fledged spinal fusion, a study from Sweden found. "Fusion was associated with longer operating time, longer hospital stay and was more expensive than decompression alone," said lead researcher Dr. Peter Forsth, an orthopedic surgeon with the Stockholm Spine Center. However, certain patients would do better with a spinal fusion, the other clinical trial concludes. That trial found that spinal fusion provided better results for low-back pain patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Back Pain, Fioricet, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Orthopedic Surgery, Advil PM, Esgic, Headache Relief, Percogesic, Bupap, Esgic-Plus, Excedrin Extra Strength, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Dolgic Plus, Aleve PM, Menstrual PMS, Dolgic

Injuries More Common in Teens Who Focus on Single Sport

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 26, 2016 – High school athletes who focus on a single sport may be at increased risk for knee and hip injuries, a new study suggests. "Make sure your children are getting breaks in competition," said study author David Bell, assistant professor in the Departments of Kinesiology and Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are so many great aspects to sports participation and we don't want this information to scare athletes or parents – we just want them to be wise consumers and to participate as safely as possible," he said in a university news release. The study included more than 300 athletes at two high schools, one large and one small. About 36 percent of the athletes had high levels of sports specialization. Nearly 29 percent had moderate specialization, and about 35 percent had low specialization, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Birth Control Pills Linked to Fewer Severe Knee Injuries in Teen Girls

Posted 23 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Teen girls who take birth control pills may be less likely to seriously injure their knees than those who don't take the pill, a new study suggests. "Young athletes currently use birth control pills for various reasons, including more predictable cycles and lighter periods," said study author Aaron Gray, an M.D./Ph.D. student at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "Injury risk reduction could potentially be added to that list," he said, if future studies confirm what the new study found. The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between birth control pills and knee injuries. The researchers only found an association between these factors. Female athletes are up to twice as likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury as male athletes, the study authors said. The ACL connects the top and bottom parts of the knee. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Surgery, Emergency Contraception, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Implanon, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa

Steroid Shot for Hip Pain May Carry Infection Risk If Too Close to Surgery

Posted 2 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 – Patients who've received a steroid injection for hip pain should wait at least three months before having hip replacement surgery, a new study suggests. "The risk of developing an infection after surgery increased significantly in patients who had a hip replacement within three months of receiving a steroid injection," study author Dr. William Schairer, from the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, said in a hospital news release. "However, in patients who had a steroid injection and then waited three months or longer to have the surgery, there was no increased risk at all." Steroid injections are widely used to ease pain and inflammation associated with arthritis. These injections can weaken the immune system, which could increase infection risk, the researchers explained. "Hip replacement is a common and safe procedure that relieves pain and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Prednisone, Methylprednisolone, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Cortisone, Dexamethasone, Medrol, Triamcinolone, Hip Replacement, Betamethasone, Budesonide, Decadron, Entocort, Orthopedic Surgery, Solu-Medrol, Fludrocortisone, Entocort EC, Florinef, Cortef

Surgical Safety Checklists May Shorten Hospital Stays, Save Lives

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A surgical safety checklist reduced patients' risk of death over 90 days and shortened their hospital stay, a new study found. The findings suggest that surgical safety checklists can reduce health care costs by reducing the risk of complications or additional surgery to correct problems, said Dr. Matthias Bock, of Bolzano Central Hospital in Italy, and colleagues. The researchers examined outcomes for more than 10,700 surgery patient in the six months before and after a 17-to-24-item surgical safety checklist was introduced at a hospital in Italy. The study did not include heart surgery patients. The death rate within 90 days of surgery was 2.4 percent before and 2.2 percent after the checklist was introduced. The 30-day death rate fell from 1.4 percent to 1.3 percent. Average length of hospital stay was 10.4 days before and 9.6 days after the checklist was ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery Often Brings Less Painful Joints: Study

Posted 4 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 – Aching knee and hip joints may hurt less after successful weight-loss surgery, a new study suggests. "In particular, walking is easier, which impacts patients' ability to adopt a more physically active lifestyle," lead researcher Wendy King said in a news release from the ObesityWeek meeting. Weight-loss surgery isn't a "magic bullet" for joint pain for every patient, however. "Some patients continue to have significant pain and disability" even after the operation, said King, who is an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health. King's team was to present the findings Wednesday at the ObesityWeek meeting in Los Angeles, which is hosted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and The Obesity Society. In the study, the researchers tracked outcomes for more than 2,200 obese people, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

The Long and (Financial) Short of Fixing Leg Length Differences

Posted 23 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 – The type of surgery used to correct significant leg length differences in children can affect the patient's income as an adult, a new study suggests. Typically, a child whose legs are different lengths has the longer leg shortened, which results in a shorter height as an adult. Lengthening the shorter leg is less common because it involves numerous surgeries and higher risk of complications, the researchers explained. But they also found that each extra inch of adult height was associated with an average increase of $1,193 in annual income, using 2010 inflation-adjusted figures. For men, each extra inch of height from 64 inches to 70 inches meant $1,660 more income per year, and each extra inch in height from 70 inches to 76 inches meant $788 more income per year. For women, each extra inch of height from 59 inches to 70 inches meant $1,186 more income per year, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Common Shoulder Injury Heals Well Without Surgery: Study

Posted 22 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 – A common shoulder injury that is usually repaired with surgery can heal just as well with nonsurgical treatment, a new study suggests. And, the researchers added, those who decide against surgery for a dislocated shoulder joint develop fewer complications and get back to work sooner. But, surgery patients seem more satisfied with the appearance of their shoulder after treatment. Found at the top of the shoulder between the collarbone and the shoulder blade, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is often injured during sports. It can also be dislocated in a fall or car accident. People with a minor injury can wear a sling and undergo physical therapy. More severe dislocations are often treated with surgery involving a plate and screws, according to the researchers. "For severe AC joint dislocations, surgery is the common practice but there's not much evidence to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Knee Replacement Brings Less Pain, Better Function

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Total knee replacement usually results in greater pain relief and better joint function after a year than nonsurgical arthritis treatment, researchers report. But baby boomers shouldn't automatically rule out physical therapy for moderate to severe knee arthritis, the authors of the new study said. "There are nearly 700,000 knee replacements done in the United States each year, but evidence of their benefit has been lacking," said lead author Soren Thorgaard Skou, a researcher in the musculoskeletal function and physiotherapy unit at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense. By 2010, knee replacement had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults 45 and over in the United States, according to data from the U.S. National Hospital Discharge Survey. Average age of the recipients was 66. For the study, Skou's team randomly assigned 100 patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Surgery, Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Higher-Volume Rehab Centers Better for Hip Fracture Recovery: Study

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Seniors who break a hip receive the best care in skilled nursing facilities with the most experience handling such fractures, a new study suggests. Twenty-five cases a year was the magic number, according to lead author Pedro Gozalo, associate professor of health services, policy and practice at the School of Public Health at Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues. "Even adjusting for a long list of patient risk factors and for important facility characteristics, facilities that had cared for more than two dozen hip fracture patients in the last 12 months were more than twice as likely to successfully discharge patients in a timely manner compared to facilities that had three or less hip fracture admissions," Gozalo said in a university news release. The researchers analyzed the medical records of more than 512,000 patients with broken hips, aged 75 ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Obesity Won't Affect Joint Surgery Safety, Study Finds

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Obese and overweight people who have joint replacement surgeries are less likely to need blood transfusions and are no more likely to face complications than normal weight patients, a new analysis finds. "It's a very complex issue," said study co-author Dr. Nolan Wessell, an orthopaedic surgery resident at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. "And this finding is somewhat surprising. "But it could just be that larger patients have a larger total blood value," he added. "And therefore lose a lower percentage of their blood than smaller patients during surgery. Essentially, it may be that they have a larger reserve in their tank, and can afford to lose a bit more blood without needing a transfusion. We don't know. But at least conceptually that makes sense." Still, senior study author Dr. Craig Silverton, vice chairman of orthopaedics at Henry Ford, cautioned that more ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Hip-Fracture Surgery Risk Not Just Due to Age, Study Finds

Posted 15 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 – People who need surgery for a broken hip face a higher risk of serious complications and death than those who undergo an elective hip replacement – and the disparity is not explained by fracture sufferers' older age or poorer health, a new study finds. Doctors have long known that hip-fracture surgery is a riskier procedure than elective hip replacements, which are done to treat severe arthritis. "Everyone has recognized that hip-fracture patients are having bad outcomes," said Dr. P.J. Devereaux, the senior researcher on the new study and a professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. "It's been assumed that it's because they're older and sicker." But his team's study, published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggests that is not the whole story. "This raises the hope that we don't have to just accept those ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

More Americans Getting Knees Replaced, And at Younger Ages

Posted 2 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 – Aging baby boomers are getting bum knees replaced at a greater rate, and at a younger age, than ever before, a new U.S. study confirms. The data, from the National Hospital Discharge Survey, shows that between 2000 and 2010, more than 5.2 million total knee replacements were performed in the United States. By 2010, the operation had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults aged 45 and over. The rate at which middle-aged and older Americans got their knees replaced almost doubled over the years covered by the study, for men and women, the researchers found. People aren't putting off the procedure for as long, either. In 2000, the average knee replacement patient was about 69 years old, but by 2010 that age had dropped to just over 66, the findings showed. One expert said there's been a change in doctors' and patients' attitudes toward the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

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