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Orthopedic Surgery Blog

Using Same Hospital for Complications After Surgery Lowers Death Risk: Study

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 18, 2015 – Surgery patients who suffer complications after discharge from a hospital are more likely to die if they're readmitted to a different hospital than where they had their original operation, a new study finds. University of Utah researchers reviewed information on millions of Medicare patients who underwent one of 12 major surgical procedures between 2001 and 2011. They found that up to one-fifth of the patients were readmitted to a hospital within 30 days due to complications. Up to 83 percent of patients with complications were readmitted to the same hospital where they had their initial surgery. Overall, readmission to the same hospital was associated with a 26 percent lower risk of death within 90 days, the study revealed. For specific types of surgeries, the risk of death associated with readmission to the same hospital ranged from 44 percent lower for ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Appendectomy, Neurosurgery, Spleen Removal, Ophthalmic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Study Questions Value of Arthroscopic Knee Surgery for Older Patients

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 – Arthroscopic surgery to relieve chronic knee pain in middle-aged and older patients is only temporarily effective and might be harmful, a new analysis suggests. Researchers who reviewed 18 studies recommended against the procedure as a treatment for arthritis pain or a torn meniscus – the shock-absorbing cartilage between the knee bones – in older adults. "We found you improve regardless of if you have surgery or nonsurgical treatment," said one of the researchers, Ewa Roos, a professor in the department of sports science and clinical biomechanics at the University of Southern Denmark. Dr. David Teuscher, president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, agrees that for this type of knee pain, arthroscopic surgery has no benefit. In fact, doctors in the U.S. no longer use this procedure to relieve knee pain, he said. "We did the research on this ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Young Athletes With ACL Injuries Often Need Repeat Surgery: Study

Posted 22 May 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 – Many young athletes who undergo surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) need a second operation later on, a new study shows. Torn ACLs are widespread among people younger than 21, said researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. "This is the first study to evaluate, on a population level, the percentage of patients under age 21 who had subsequent ACL or non-ACL knee surgery following a primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction," lead investigator Dr. Emily Dodwell, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, said in a hospital news release. Using a New York state database, her team identified 23,912 cases of ACL reconstruction in patients younger than 21. Of these patients, 8 percent needed a second surgery on this ligament, and 14 percent needed another knee surgery that didn't involve their ACL. The median time between surgeries ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Orthopedist Offers Tips for Preventing Shoulder Injuries

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – As the most flexible joint in your body, your shoulder can move and position your arm in many ways. But this flexibility also makes it prone to instability and injury. Shoulder muscles, ligaments and tendons can be injured by sports, household chores and heavy lifting. These injuries sometimes take months to heal and can interfere with everyday tasks, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says. In 2010, about 16 million Americans visited their doctor for a shoulder problem, and more than 2.7 million were diagnosed with sprains and strains of the shoulder and upper arm, according to the academy. "Strengthening and stretching the muscles that support your shoulder joint can keep it stable and restore range of motion to help reduce the risk of injuries," orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brent Ponce, an academy spokesman, said in an academy news release. "If you ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Second 'Tommy John' Surgery Is No Win for Pitchers

Posted 24 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 – Having a second elbow ligament reconstruction surgery appears to lower professional baseball pitchers' performance and shorten their careers, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 33 major league pitchers who had surgery twice to reconstruct a torn ulnar collateral ligament in their throwing arm – a procedure widely referred to as "Tommy John" surgery because he's the first pitcher who had the surgery. After the second UCL reconstruction, 65 percent of the pitchers returned to pitching at a major league level. They averaged three years or less at the major league level after the second procedure. The number of innings they pitched decreased by nearly half, according to the study. The number of pitches resulting in walks rose from 4.02 to 4.79 for every nine innings, and their wins and losses dropped in half following the second surgery. The Henry Ford ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

Common Knee Surgery May Boost Arthritis Risk, Study Suggests

Posted 3 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 – A common type of knee surgery may increase the chances of arthritis, a new study suggests. The procedure repairs tears in the meniscus, a piece of cartilage that acts as a shock absorber. There are two in each knee, and they stabilize the knee joint. Meniscal tears are one of the most common knee injuries, and surgery is often performed to reduce pain and improve joint function, the researchers said. In their study, the scientists used MRI scans to look at 355 knees with arthritis, and compared them to a similar number of knees without arthritis. The average age of the patients was about 60 and most were overweight. All 31 knees that were operated on to repair meniscal tears developed arthritis within a year, compared with 59 percent of knees with meniscal damage that did not have surgery. Cartilage loss occurred in nearly 81 percent of knees that had meniscal ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Orthopedic Surgery

Many Orthopedic Surgery Patients Low on Vitamin D

Posted 9 Oct 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 – Nearly half of patients undergoing orthopedic surgery have vitamin D deficiency, which can impair their recovery, researchers say. In these cases, patients' vitamin D levels need to be brought up to normal levels before they undergo surgery, according to researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Vitamin D is essential for bone healing and muscle function. "In the perfect world, test levels, fix and then operate," study leader Dr. Joseph Lane, a professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of the hospital's Metabolic Bone Disease Service, said in a hospital news release. According to Lane, an important part of the healing process – bone tissue formation – occurs around two to four weeks after surgery and is the critical period that the body needs vitamin D. "If you put people on 2,000 to 4,000 [milligrams] of vitamin D based on what their ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin D Deficiency, Orthopedic Surgery, Vitamin D Insufficiency

Arthroscopic Hip Surgery May Help Athletes Get Back to Play

Posted 15 Jul 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 15 – The use of minimally invasive "arthroscopic" surgery to treat painful disorders of the hip offers athletes who undergo the procedure a good shot at ultimately resuming their respective sport at a highly competitive level, a new study suggests. Researchers determined that nearly 80 percent of athletes suffering from hip arthritis sparked by internal ball and socket joint damage to the hip ("hip impingement") were able to return to their sport within an average of a little more than nine months following a hip arthroscopy. What's more, about 90 percent were capable of competing at the same level as they had prior to their initial hip impairment, the study authors noted. "In athletic activities which require a high degree of motion and significant force through the joint, there can be earlier onset of symptomatic injury," Dr. Bryan Kelly, sports medicine orthopedic ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery

Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery

Posted 4 Feb 2009 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 – Exercise may play a key role in helping people recover from total knee replacement and knee osteoarthritis (OA), two new studies show. After receiving a total knee replacement, patients following a six-week progressive strengthening program showed much improvement in strength, function and pain when compared to those following the conventional care of inpatient rehabilitation and home physical therapy, according to a University of Delaware study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research. Those in the exercise program – which consisted of sessions focused on knee extension, range of motion, kneecap mobility, quadriceps strength, pain control and gait two to three times a week – also showed much greater strength in their quadriceps and functional performance than the other group a year after the program. Half of those in the exercise group also ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Orthopedic Surgery

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Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Surgery