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Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Blog

Related terms: Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, Idiopathic Fatty Liver, Steatosis, Steatohepatitis, Fatty Liver, NASH, NAFLD

Scarring May Raise Death Risk From Fatty Liver Disease

Posted 16 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 16 – Advanced fibrosis – or progressive scarring of the liver – is tied to higher death rates from a type of fatty liver disease found in people who drink little or no alcohol, according to a new study. This increased mortality is primarily due to heart-related causes, not nonalcoholic fatty liver disease alone, the researchers said. The study was published in the April issue of the journal Hepatology. "Our findings confirm that [nonalcoholic fatty liver disease] patients without advanced fibrosis do not have higher mortality risk," lead study investigator Dr. W. Kim Ray, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a journal news release. "Careful monitoring of disease progression in patients with [nonalcoholic fatty liver disease] and fibrosis, along with interventions that reduce cardiovascular risk factors, are warranted." The study involved data on more than ... Read more

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Fatty Liver Disease Doesn't Affect Survival, Study Finds

Posted 28 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28 – A condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) does not increase the risk of death, according to a new study finding that surprised Johns Hopkins researchers. It's long been thought that NAFLD – a condition associated with obesity and heart disease – had a detrimental impact on health and longevity. But the new study concluded that NAFLD does not affect survival. "Physicians have considered fatty liver disease a really worrisome risk factor for cardiovascular disease," study leader Dr. Mariana Lazo, a postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, said in a Hopkins news release. "Our data analysis shows this doesn't appear to be the case. We were surprised to say the least because we expected to learn by how much non-alcoholic fatty liver disease increased the ... Read more

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Obesity Greater Risk for Fatty Liver Than Alcohol, Study Finds

Posted 2 Jun 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2 – Obesity and insulin resistance constitute a greater risk for fatty liver disease than moderate alcohol consumption, according to a new study that found drinking modest amounts of red wine posed no greater risk for developing the condition. For their study, published online May 23 in Annals of Medicine, Swedish researchers instructed 44 people to either abstain from alcohol or drink one (women) or two (men) glasses of red wine a day for three months. At the beginning and end of the three months, the investigators collected blood samples and conducted MRIs to measure the fatty content of participants' livers. "It turned out that the amount of fat in the liver was linked with obesity and insulin resistance and was almost not at all affected by the red wine. Specifically, after three months, none of the wine drinkers had developed fatty liver or elevated liver ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Vitamin E, Diabetes Drug May Not Ease Obesity-Linked Liver Trouble in Kids

Posted 27 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 26 – Neither vitamin E nor the diabetes medication metformin worked any better than a placebo in treating fatty liver disease in children, according to new research. Fatty liver disease is an increasingly common, yet not well-known, disorder that can lead to very serious complications, such as cirrhosis of the liver. In the United States, as many as 20 percent of adults and 5 percent of children have the disorder, which is strongly tied to obesity, according to the American College of Gastroenterology. It had been hoped that vitamin E or metformin might help kids battle fatty liver disease. But when the researchers compared the two treatments to placebo on their ability to improve the results of a blood test that measures liver health, they found no statistically significant difference. However, when the researchers compared the results of a liver biopsy done at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Metformin, Glucophage, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Vitamin E, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet, Fortamet, Aquasol E, Alpha E, Aquavite-E, E Pherol, Amino-Opti-E, Nutr-E-Sol, Centrum Singles-Vitamin E, Vita-Plus E Natural, E-400 Clear, Aqua-E

Aerobic Exercise May Curb Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Report

Posted 13 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 13 – Aerobic exercise may slow the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese people, finds a new study. This type of workout appears to benefit these patients by increasing their metabolism and easing the oxidative damage caused by the liver disease, said the Cleveland Clinic researchers. Their study included 15 obese people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease who walked on a treadmill at 85 percent of their maximum heart rate for one hour a day for seven consecutive days. The exercise increased the participants' insulin sensitivity and improved the liver's polyunsaturated lipid index (PUI)-- believed to be a marker of liver health – by 84 percent. These improvements were linked to an increase in the hormone adiponectin, which plays a role in the body's response to insulin and has anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce the risk of heart ... Read more

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Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease

Posted 29 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 28 – A new study has identified vitamin E as a treatment that can provide relief for many of the estimated 10 million Americans who have the most common chronic liver disease. "This clearly shows that vitamin E is effective for treatment of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis who don't have active diabetes," said study author Dr. Arun J. Sanyal, chairman of the division of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at Virginia Commonwealth University. A report on the trial is published in the April 28 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. A second drug tested in the trial, the diabetes medication pioglitazone (Actos), provided some relief but did not meet the benchmarks set in the study, Sanyal added. The trial did not test the two treatments head-to-head. Instead, each was tested against a placebo, an inactive substance. Those treatments were ... Read more

Related support groups: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Vitamin E, Aquasol E, Alpha E, Aquavite-E, E Pherol, Nutr-E-Sol, Amino-Opti-E, Vita-Plus E Natural, Centrum Singles-Vitamin E, E-400 Clear, TheraTears Nutrition, Aqua-E

Researchers Identify 2 Genes Linked to Fatty Liver Disease

Posted 24 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 24 – Researchers have identified two gene variants that increase the risk of both the most common chronic liver disease in the United States as well as type 2 diabetes. People who carry the variants of a gene for apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3), which produces an enzyme important in fat metabolism, have a higher incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and also insulin resistance, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The research group was led by Dr. Gerald I. Shulman, a professor of physiological chemistry, medicine and cellular and molecular physiology at Yale University. Identification of the gene variants "might make it possible to screen individuals to see if they have a higher risk of fatty liver disease," Shulman said. "It also can provide an ideal drug target to prevent development of fatty liver disease and insulin ... Read more

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High Fructose Corn Syrup Linked to Liver Scarring

Posted 20 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 19 – New research links consumption of high-fructose corn syrup, the extremely popular sweetener that shows up in food products from ketchup to jelly, to liver damage in people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It's not clear if the sweetener directly causes liver scarring, also known as fibrosis, but those who consumed more of the sweetener appeared to have more liver scarring, according to the report released online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the journal Hepatology. "We have identified an environmental risk factor that may contribute to the metabolic syndrome of insulin resistance and the complications of the metabolic syndrome, including liver injury," Dr. Manal Abdelmalek, associate professor of medicine in the division of gastroenterology/hepatology at Duke University Medical Center and leader of a team of scientists behind the new ... Read more

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