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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Blog

Related terms: Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Histiocytic Lymphoma, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Lymphoma, Histiocytic, Lymphoma, Lymphoblastic, Lymphoma, Lymphocytic, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's

Lymphoma Treatment May Harm, Halt Men's Sperm Production

Posted 26 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 (HealthDay – Treatment for lymphoma may lower men's fertility, new research indicates. Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are cancers of the body's white blood cells, often affect young people who are still in their reproductive years. For men, treatment for these cancers can harm or halt sperm production. Although most men regain their fertility within two years of treatment, the researchers cautioned that men should be counseled about the possibility of this significant side effect before treatment begins. "While many men can look forward to their fertility returning after treatment is over, not all will be so fortunate," Dr. Rebecca Sokol, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a society news release. "It is imperative that prior to the initiation of therapy, counseling and sperm preservation be made available to ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

FDA Approves Zydelig (idelalisib) for CLL and Lymphoma

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 23, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zydelig (idelalisib) to treat patients with three types of blood cancers. Zydelig is being granted traditional approval to treat patients whose chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has returned (relapsed). Used in combination with Rituxan (rituximab), Zydelig is to be used in patients for whom Rituxan alone would be considered appropriate therapy due to other existing medical conditions (co-morbidities). Zydelig is the fifth new drug with breakthrough therapy designation to be approved by the FDA and the third drug with this designation approved to treat CLL. The FDA is also granting Zydelig accelerated approval to treat patients with relapsed follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), another type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Zydelig is intended to be used in patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

Zydelig Approved for Three Types of Blood Cancer

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 – Zydelig (idelalisib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat relapsed forms of blood cancer, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), the FDA said Wednesday in a news release. The approval for the three forms of blood cancer covers instances when the cancer returns despite treatment with at least one other therapy, the agency said. The drug's label will include a boxed warning that the medication could cause liver toxicity, diarrhea, high blood sugar, elevated liver enzymes, high blood triglycerides [a blood fat] and inflammation of the colon (colitis). Other side effects noted during clinical testing included fever, fatigue, nausea, cough, pneumonia, abdominal pain, chills and rash. Zydelig is marketed by Gilead Sciences, based in Foster City, ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

FDA Approves Beleodaq (belinostat) for Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

Posted 3 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 3, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Beleodaq (belinostat) for the treatment of patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), a rare and fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The action was taken under the agency’s accelerated approval program. PTCL comprises a diverse group of rare diseases in which lymph nodes become cancerous. In 2014, the National Cancer Institute estimates that 70,800 Americans will be diagnosed with NHL and 18,990 will die. PTCL represents about 10 to 15 percent of NHLs in North America. Beleodaq works by stopping enzymes that contribute to T-cells, a type of immune cell, becoming cancerous. It is intended for patients whose disease returned after treatment (relapsed) or did not respond to previous treatment (refractory). “This is the third drug that has been approved since 2009 for the treatment of peripheral T-c ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

Beleodaq Approved for Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Posted 3 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 3, 2014 – Beleodaq (belinostat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat peripheral T-Cell lymphoma (PTCL), a rare and aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes). Some 70,800 Americans will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma this year, of which up to 15 percent will be PTCL, according to U.S. National Cancer Institute estimates. Beleodaq is designed to inhibit immune cells called T-cells from becoming cancerous, the FDA explained Thursday in a news release. The drug is intended for people whose cancer has returned or who didn't respond to a prior therapy, the agency said. Beleodaq's safety and effectiveness were evaluated in clinical studies involving 129 people with PTCL. All were treated with the newly approved drug, and about 26 percent had their cancer disappear or shrink, the FDA said. The most common side ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

FDA Approves Imbruvica for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Posted 13 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

November 13, 2013 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Imbruvica (ibrutinib) to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a rare and aggressive type of blood cancer. MCL is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and represents about 6 percent of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases in the United States. By the time MCL is diagnosed, it usually has already spread to the lymph nodes, bone marrow and other organs. Imbruvica is intended for patients with MCL who have received at least one prior therapy. It works by inhibiting the enzyme needed by the cancer to multiply and spread. Imbruvica is the third drug approved to treat MCL. Velcade (2006) and Revlimid (2013) are also approved to treat the disease. “Imbruvica’s approval demonstrates the FDA’s commitment to making treatments available to patients with rare diseases,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office o ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Early Stem Cell Transplant May Benefit Some Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients

Posted 31 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 31 – Early stem cell transplants do not improve overall survival in high-risk patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but may be beneficial for a small group of patients with the very highest risk, according to a new study. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is cancer of the white blood cells (lymphocytes). Larger-than-normal lymph nodes and fever are common symptoms. Many patients with this type of cancer relapse after undergoing chemotherapy and require an autologous stem cell transplant. In that procedure, the patient's own stem cells are removed before they receive high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation. After the chemotherapy, the patient's stem cells are returned to help replenish the body's supply of blood cells. This study of 397 patients in the United States and Canada looked at whether giving patients a stem cell transplant before they relapsed would improve ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

New Strategy Helps Young Lymphoma Patients Avoid Radiation Treatment

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – A new treatment approach may mean that young people with a form of lymphoma can go without radiation therapy, sparing them side effects or raised cancer risks down the road. In a trial conducted by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, nearly all patients with a form of cancer known as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who received chemotherapy, but did not undergo chest radiation, achieved a full remission. Standard treatment for this cancer typically includes radiation to the chest, the study authors pointed out, but this has been linked to significant harmful effects in the future, particularly for women. "These results are exciting and demonstrate that, using this approach, almost all patients appear to be cured and very few patients require radiation," study co-author Dr. Kieron Dunleavy, of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, said in an agency news release. ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Cancer Chemotherapy Tied to Slight Rise in Risk for Leukemia

Posted 14 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 – Chemotherapy can be a lifesaver for thousands of cancer patients, but a new study suggests that it might slightly raise the odds for a type of leukemia later in life. Over the past 30 years, the risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has increased for patients who underwent chemotherapy for certain forms of cancer, particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the new study found. On the other hand, the researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute said other cancer survivors may have a reduced risk for AML due to a change in chemotherapy agents that occurred decades ago. One expert not connected to the study stressed that cancer patients need to put the findings into perspective. "It's important to realize that the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia related to prior chemotherapy is small and increases with the number of chemotherapy treatments given over time," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Lupron, Accutane, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Claravis, Rituxan, Tretinoin, Zoladex, Votrient, Tarceva, Avastin

'Rediscovered' Lymphoma Drug Helps Double Survival: Study

Posted 4 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, June 3 – A drug first developed in East Germany in the 1960s has re-emerged as a potent "new" weapon against certain types of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, researchers report. The drug, bendamustine, more than doubled disease progression-free survival when given along with another therapy, rituximab (Rituxan), compared to the drug cocktail that's long been used to fight indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The bendamustine/rituximab combination also left patients with fewer side effects than the older treatment, the trial found. One expert, Dr. Joshua Brody, an assistant professor of hematology/oncology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, called the findings "quite exciting." "Simultaneously increasing efficacy and decreasing toxicity is a rare win-win in oncology, and this has already prompted an enormous shift in the way we care for these patients," he said. The findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Rituxan, Rituximab, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Treanda, Bendamustine

Growing Up Near Livestock Tied to Blood Cancers

Posted 28 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 28 – Children raised on livestock farms are at significantly greater risk of developing blood cancers – such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma – later in life, a new study contends. The researchers pointed out that further studies will be needed before a definitive cause and effect can be established, but they suggested that exposure to particular viruses during childhood may modify the immune system response and result in a higher risk for blood cancer in adulthood. In conducting the study, published in the July 28 online edition of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, researchers compiled information from 114,000 death certificates for people between 35 and 85 years of age who died between 1998 and 2003 in New Zealand. The study found that over the five-year period, more than 3,000 deaths were attributed to blood cancers. Moreover, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Could Dogs' DNA Give Clues to Human Lymphoma?

Posted 13 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 12 – Scientists are rearranging the genetic information of certain dogs to make the coding human-like as a way to learn more about the genetic causes in people of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system. Humans and dogs have a similar genetic makeup and share the same types of cancers, including lymphoma. In purebred dogs of the same breed, however, there are fewer genetic variations than in humans, making it simpler to locate areas of the canine chromosomes that may be involved with cancer. In a new study, North Carolina State University researchers gathered genetic information from dogs with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and then rearranged, or recoded, the genomes of the dogs into human configuration. The recoded dog genomes were then compared with the genomes of people with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to identify chromosomes involved in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

U.S. Reports Drop in AIDS-Related Cancers

Posted 12 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 12 – Cases of AIDS-related cancers have decreased among people with HIV in the United States, but other types of cancer are on the rise in this group, a new study has found. Three cancers – Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and invasive cervical cancer – are among the diseases included in the criteria that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses to determine whether a person with HIV has developed AIDS. The study, by researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that these AIDS-defining cancers decreased threefold, from 34,000 cases between 1991 and 1995 to about 10,000 cases between 2001 and 2005. They attributed the decrease to the introduction in 1996 of highly active antiretroviral therapy, which improves immune function, reduces risk of progression to AIDS and greatly ... Read more

Related support groups: HIV Infection, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Kaposi's Sarcoma

Study Finds Big Strides Made in Treating Leukemia, Lymphoma in Past Decade

Posted 24 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 – Clinicians have made remarkable advances in treating blood cancers with bone marrow and blood stem cell transplants in recent years, significantly reducing the risk of treatment-related complications and death, a new study shows. Between the early 1990s and 2007, there was a 41 percent drop in the overall risk of death in an analysis of more than 2,500 patients treated at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, a leader in the field of blood cancers and other malignancies. Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, who conducted the study, also noted dramatic decreases in treatment complications such as infection and organ damage. The study was published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine "We have made enormous strides in understanding this very complex procedure and have yielded quite spectacular results," said study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Hairy Cell Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

Children of Older Dads at Higher Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Posted 9 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 9 – Children born to older fathers are at increased risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a new study has found. Researchers analyzed data on 110,999 California women and found that those born to fathers older than 40 had a 59 percent greater risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (cancer of the blood and immune system) than those born to fathers younger than 25. The study, which appears online and in the June 15 print issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, is one of the first to examine the link between parents' age and their adult children's risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the authors said. The findings add to the growing evidence that a father's age may have a significant effect on a child's health, said study author Yani Lu, of the City of Hope research and treatment center in Duarte, Calif. For example, other studies have found that children of older fathers may be more ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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