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Certain Cancers Seem Less Likely for Kids of Hispanic Moms Born Outside U.S.

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 25, 2016 – Children of Hispanic mothers who weren't born in the United States may be at lower risk for some types of childhood cancers, a new study suggests. "Incorporating the immigrant experience into studies of childhood cancer may help to inform research on disease [causes], identify vulnerable populations and highlight opportunities for cancer prevention," said Julia Heck, of the University of California, Los Angeles, and her study co-authors. It is important to evaluate childhood cancer risk in the large and growing Hispanic population, the research team said. For the study, the investigators analyzed data from children born in California between 1983 and 2012. The analysis was limited to children of U.S.-born white, U.S.-born Hispanic, or non-U.S.-born Hispanic mothers. Among the children, there were about 13,600 cancer diagnoses before age 6, and more than 15.5 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Malignant Glioma, Wilms' Tumor, Anaplastic Astrocytoma, Neuroblastoma

Chemo May Prolong Lives of Some Brain Cancer Patients: Study

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – Adding chemotherapy to radiation treatment may add years to the lives of people with certain slow-growing brain tumors, a new study finds. The findings come from a long-term follow-up of patients who took part in a trial that began in 1998. All were treated for grade 2 gliomas – tumors that begin in brain cells called glial cells and are relatively slow-growing. Earlier results from the trial had shown that adding chemotherapy to the standard treatment of radiation – with or without surgery – can help keep tumors from progressing. Now there's proof that it prolongs people's lives, too. "Until now, there hasn't been any therapy known to improve life expectancy for these patients," said lead researcher Dr. Jan Buckner. He is the chair of oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In the United States, nearly 23,000 adults were diagnosed with brain ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma, History - Radiation Therapy

Brain Cancers Both Common and Deadly Among Teens, Young Adults: Report

Posted 24 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24, 2016 – Brain cancers are the most common cause of cancer deaths among teens and young adults, but the types of cancers that strike can vary widely as people age, a new report shows. "For these individuals – who are finishing school, pursuing their careers and starting and raising young families – a brain tumor diagnosis is especially cruel and disruptive," said Elizabeth Wilson, president and CEO of the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA). "This report enables us for the first time to zero in on the types of tumors occurring at key [age] intervals over a 25-year time span, to help guide critical research investments and strategies for living with a brain tumor that reflect the patient's unique needs," Wilson said in an association news release. The ABTA-funded report, which used data from 51 separate cancer registries that represented 99.9 percent of the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma

Allergies, Asthma Tied to Lower Risk of Brain Cancer

Posted 5 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 – People with respiratory allergies, asthma and the skin condition eczema may be less likely to develop glioma brain cancer, a new study suggests. The international team of researchers looked at more than 4,500 glioma patients and almost 4,200 people without brain cancer. The investigators found that a history of respiratory allergies, asthma and eczema was associated with a reduced risk for glioma. People with respiratory allergies or eczema were 30 percent less likely to develop the deadly brain cancer than those without such conditions, the study found. Although the study found an association between allergic conditions and a lower risk of gliomas, it wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between those factors. The study was released online Feb. 5 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. "Many other studies have shown this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Brain Tumor, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Head and Neck Cancer, Allergic Asthma, Malignant Glioma, Head Imaging

Signs of Brain Tumor May Show in Blood Years Before Diagnosis

Posted 18 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 – Brain tumors known as gliomas usually produce symptoms several months before they're diagnosed, but new research found changes in immune function may occur up to five years before these cancers are detected. "Now, clinicians don't have any way to detect the tumors until patients have symptoms, which is typically three months before diagnosis. I see something five years before," study author Judith Schwartzbaum, an associate professor of epidemiology at Ohio State University, in Columbus. Researchers analyzed blood samples collected over 40 years in Norway from people getting annual checkups or donating blood. Norway also has a cancer registry, enabling the researchers to identify blood samples of people who developed a brain tumor. The blood samples were collected an average of 15 years before tumors were detected. Specifically, the researchers compared ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Brain Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma

Removing All Visible Cancer Is Key to Treating Aggressive Brain Tumors

Posted 14 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 – Surgery that removes all visible cancer significantly improves the chances of survival for children with aggressive brain tumors, especially girls. That's the finding of a study that included almost 100 children treated for high-grade glioma brain cancer between 1988 and 2010. These rare brain tumors occur in fewer than one in 100,000 children and teens. After two years, the overall survival rate was 45 percent; 25 percent had no cancer progression. Surgery to remove all visible signs of cancer was successful in one-third of the children. Their median survival was 3.4 years, compared with 1.6 years for those who did not have all visible cancer removed. Median means half of the children lived longer, half did not. The survival benefit after successful surgery was much greater in girls, with median survival of 8.1 years. Boys had a median survival of 2.4 years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Neurosurgery, Malignant Glioma

Treatments for Brain Cancer Take Heavy Toll on the Brain

Posted 3 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 – Radiation and chemotherapy can cause structural changes in the healthy brain tissue of patients with glioblastoma brain tumors, a new study finds. The research included 14 glioblastoma patients who underwent 35 weeks of combined radiation and chemotherapy (chemoradiation) after having their tumors surgically removed. The patients had brain scans before and after chemoradiation, but an adequate number of images were obtained from only eight of the patients. Those images revealed a significant decrease in whole brain volume – the overall amount of brain tissue – throughout chemoradiation. The reduced amount of brain tissue became apparent within a few weeks after the start of chemoradiation and was primarily seen in gray matter. The scans also showed that the size of the brain's ventricles – cerebrospinal fluid-filled spaces deep within the brain – grew ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma

U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 – Soaring costs for cancer drugs are hurting patient care in the United States, a group of top oncologists claim. "High cancer-drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. Tefferi and his colleagues made a number of recommendations on how to address the problem in a commentary published July 23 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices is one of the suggestions the team of 118 leading cancer experts offered as a possible solution. Along with their recommendations, the group also expressed support for a patient-based grassroots movement on change.org that is demanding action on the issue. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Tretinoin, Femara, Fluorouracil, Lupron Depot, Gleevec, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma

Patients with Low-Grade Brain Tumors Living Longer

Posted 1 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, JuLY 1, 2015 – Survival has improved for adults with low-grade brain tumors, known as gliomas, a new study finds. Low-grade gliomas grow slowly but are deadly. Because they're uncommon, they are not well-studied, said the researchers from the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. The best ways to manage these tumors are also controversial. There is little consensus on whether or when to use radiation or what type of surgery or chemotherapy patients should undergo. "An understanding of how our treatments affect the survival of low-grade glioma patients will better enable us to help these patients," senior study author Dr. Clark Chen, vice chairman of research and academic development in neurosurgery, said in a university news release. For the study, published July 1 in Neuro-Oncology: Clinical Practice, researchers examined data compiled in a U.S. cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Malignant Glioma

Harnessing the Power of the Poliovirus as a Cancer Cure

Posted 31 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

Polio, a highly infectious and crippling disease, was certainly one of the most feared viruses in the 20th century. Each year, thousands of children were left paralyzed. Polio has been successfully eliminated in the U.S. for decades due to a widespread vaccine program. So why would a group of researchers be interested in injecting the poliovirus directly into the brain of a patient? Clinical trials are now ongoing and research is revisiting the poliovirus in new and hopeful ways, ironically to help battle deadly cancers. Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most common and fatal brain cancers. Gliobastomas are aggressive tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord leading to headaches, nausea, seizures, blurred vision and a host of other unpleasant effects. The tumors grow quickly and often leave patients with only months to live. Treatments for glioblastoma involve surgery to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma

Use of 'the Pill' Tied to Higher Risk for Rare Brain Cancer

Posted 22 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 – The risk for developing a rare form of brain cancer known as glioma appears to go up with long-term use of hormonal contraceptives such as the Pill, new Danish research suggests. Women under 50 with a glioma "were 90 percent more likely to have been using hormonal contraceptives for five years or more, compared with women from the general population with no history of brain tumor," said study leader Dr. David Gaist. However, the Danish study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, and Gaist stressed that the findings "need to be put in context" for women because "glioma is very rare." How rare? Only five out of every 100,000 Danish women between the ages of 15 and 49 develop the condition each year, according to Gaist, a professor of neurology at Odense University Hospital. He said that figure includes women who take contraceptives such as the birth control pill. So, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Implanon, Provera, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa, Lutera, Mononessa

Gauging Brain Cancer Survival Time May Get Easier: Study

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Life expectancy of people with aggressive brain cancer may be easier to determine with a new method under development at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, researchers say. The UAB researchers found that patients with an overactive version of a specific enzyme live less than half as long as those with a less active version. This overactive enzyme can help predict how resistant the brain cancer will be to chemotherapy, and also help doctors arrive at treatment recommendations, the researchers said. In conducting the study, published April 10 in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers examined tumors from 84 patients with a form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This deadly and aggressive cancer quickly becomes resistant to available treatments. With a combination of surgery, radiation and the chemotherapy drug temozolomide, patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma, Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma, Anaplastic Astrocytoma, Angioblastoma

Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer

Posted 3 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 3 – A vaccination may help boost the immune system of children with brain tumors, a small new study reports. The prognosis for many children with brain tumors, known as gliomas, is grim. Radiation is the only effective treatment, although there has been hope that a vaccine could boost the immune system's response. The results of the new study, which included 27 children and was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, were released Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Chicago. "We've found that the vaccine is tolerated well with limited systemic toxicity, but we've also observed that there are some patients who have immunological responses to the vaccine target in the brain that can cause swelling and transient worsening, and subsequently, some of those children can have very favorable responses," study lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Malignant Glioma, Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma

Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms

Posted 28 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 – Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death. That's why it's crucial that patients insist doctors use plain language in explaining the options, advised Angela Fagerlin, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "People are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they're getting themselves into. Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo," Fagerlin said in a university news release. She and her colleagues outlined a number of tips to help patients get the information they need ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Femara, Tretinoin, Fluorouracil, Lupron Depot, Gleevec, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma

Cell Phones May Cause Brain Cancer, WHO Experts Say

Posted 31 May 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 31 – Cell phones may cause brain cancer, a panel of experts reporting to the World Health Organization (WHO) announced Tuesday. After reviewing dozens of studies that explored a possible link between cancer and the ubiquitous hand-held phones, the experts classified cell phones as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" and placed them in the same category as the pesticide DDT and gasoline engine exhaust. The panel determined that an increased risk for glioma, a malignant form of brain cancer, appears associated with wireless phone use. Globally, it's estimated that 5 billion cell phones are in use. "The number of users is large and growing, particularly among young adults and children," the International Agency for Research on Cancer said in a news release issued Tuesday. The IARC made the announcement in Lyons, France, based on the work of 31 scientists from 14 countries. It ... Read more

Related support groups: Malignant Glioma

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