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Malaria News

Pediatricians' Group Urges Action on Climate Change

Posted 26 Oct 2015 by

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 – Dirtier air, heat stress, greater exposure to Lyme disease – these and other threats to children will increase because of climate change, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns. Doctors and policy makers must take steps to protect youngsters from the hazardous effects of climate change, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a new policy statement. "Every child needs a safe and healthy environment and climate change is a rising public health threat to all children in this country and around the world," academy president Dr. Sandra Hassink said in a news release from the organization. The threats to children also include natural disasters, more infectious diseases and problems with food and water supplies, the academy said. "Pediatricians have a unique and powerful voice in this conversation due to their knowledge of child health and disease, and their ... Read more

Related support groups: Lyme Disease, Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Heat Stress

Gains in Life Spans Seen Around the Globe

Posted 27 Aug 2015 by

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 – Average life expectancy among people worldwide has risen by more than six years since 1990, and healthy life expectancy has climbed by more than five years, a new report shows. The analysis of data from 188 countries found that life expectancy for both sexes increased from just over 65 years in 1990 to 71.5 years in 2013, while healthy life expectancy rose from almost 57 years to slightly more than 62 years. The findings regarding healthy life expectancy versus total life expectancy mean that people are living more years with illness and disability, according to the authors of the study published Aug. 27 in The Lancet. "The world has made great progress in health, but now the challenge is to invest in finding more effective ways of preventing or treating the major causes of illness and disability," study author Theo Vos, a professor at the Institute for Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Ischemic Stroke, HIV Infection, Malaria, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease

Ebola Linked to Rise in Malaria Deaths in Guinea

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 – The Ebola epidemic in West Africa appears to have led to an increase in malaria deaths last year, a new study finds. Research in Guinea, one of the countries hardest hit by the Ebola epidemic, indicates an extra 74,000 cases of malaria went untreated in 2014, compared to previous years. As a result, deaths associated with malaria (a mosquito-borne disease) also rose and will likely exceed Ebola deaths in Guinea, researchers reported June 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "One problem is that the early symptoms of malaria [fever, headache and body aches] mimic those of Ebola virus disease," said study author Dr. Mateusz Plucinski, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Malaria is one of the main causes of fever and health facilities visits in Guinea, but our data suggest that since the start of the Ebola epidemic, people with fevers ... Read more

Related support groups: Doxycycline, Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Malaria, Quinine, Doryx, Malarone, Malaria Prevention, Oracea, Chloroquine, Mefloquine, Doxy Lemmon, Monodox, Vibramycin, Lariam, Adoxa, Doxy 100, Qualaquin, Malaria Prophylaxis, Artemether/Lumefantrine

Ebola Outbreak May Have Led to Almost 11,000 Additional Malaria Deaths: Study

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – Nearly 11,000 extra deaths due to malaria may have occurred in 2014 because of disruptions in health care services caused by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a new study suggests. Another 3,900 extra malaria deaths may have been caused by the interruption of delivery of insecticide-treated sleeping nets, the British researchers said. The study appears online April 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "The ongoing Ebola epidemic in parts of West Africa largely overwhelmed already fragile health care systems in 2014, making adequate care for malaria impossible and threatening to jeopardize progress made in malaria control and elimination over the past decade," study author Patrick Walker, of the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial College London, said in a journal news release. The findings suggest that the number of malaria deaths ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Shielding African Children

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – According to the World Health Organization, about 584,000 people, mostly in Africa, die from mosquito-borne malaria each year. Most of those victims are children, but the success of a new malaria vaccine in late-stage trials could offer real hope against the disease, experts say. There is currently no vaccine for malaria, and the new vaccine, called RTS,S/AS01, was developed for use in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria kills about 1,300 children every day. The phase 3 trial of the vaccine included more than 15,400 newborns (ages 6 to 12 weeks at first vaccination) and children (5 to 17 months at first vaccination) at 11 sites in seven sub-Saharan African countries. A team led by Brian Greenwood, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, reported that the vaccine protected the children more than the newborns, but protection weakened over time in ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Malaria Growing Resistant to Drugs Used to Fight It

Posted 30 Jul 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, July 30, 2014 – The parasite that causes malaria is growing increasingly resistant to the drugs commonly used to fight it, according to new surveillance reports. But several new drugs are in development, and at least one in early clinical trials may offer new hope against this global killer. "Although there has been considerable progress in malaria control in the past decade, the battle against malaria is far from won, and there is still much more to do," said Dr. Brian Greenwood, professor of tropical medicine at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who wrote a commentary accompanying the new research. Especially worrisome is the growing power of malaria parasites to survive the drugs that are designed to kill them, Greenwood said. One study reported widespread resistance to the drug artemisinin across mainland Southeast Asia. A second study found resistance to a ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

Researchers Explore New Target for Malaria Vaccine

Posted 25 May 2014 by

THURSDAY, May 22, 2014 – Scientists have developed a new vaccine for malaria using protective immune system cells from children who appear to be naturally resistant to the deadly infectious disease. Initial tests of the vaccine in mice looked promising, according to a new study. Certain children are naturally resistant to the mosquito-borne infectious disease. And, it was recently discovered that these children harbor certain protective immune system cells (antibodies). These antibodies are programmed to block the malaria parasite from getting out of red blood cells, where they can multiply and cause more serious disease. The researchers created a vaccine with these antibodies. And, when given to mice, the vaccine offered some protection against malaria. When the animals were given a malaria strain that is universally fatal to mice, the vaccinated rodents developed lower levels of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

First Effective Malaria Vaccine May Be Near, Experts Say

Posted 8 Oct 2013 by

TUESDAY, Oct. 8 – Promising results from a large-scale clinical trial mean that the world's first malaria vaccine may be on the market by 2015 and could potentially save hundreds of thousands of lives a year. The phase III clinical trial of more than 15,000 infants and young children in Africa found that the vaccine – called RTS,S – continued to protect the youngsters from malaria for up to 18 months after vaccination. The ongoing trial of the RTS,S vaccine is being conducted by 11 research centers in seven African countries, together with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative and drug maker GlaxoSmithKline. "It appears that the RTS,S candidate vaccine has the potential to have a significant public health impact," Halidou Tinto, lead investigator from the Nanoro, Burkina Faso trial site in West Africa, said in a PATH news release. "Preventing substantial numbers of malaria cases in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

FDA Medwatch Alert: Mefloquine Hydrochloride: Drug Safety Communication - Label Changes Due To Risk of Serious Psychiatric and Nerve Side Effects

Posted 29 Jul 2013 by

ISSUE: FDA is advising the public about strengthened and updated warnings regarding neurologic and psychiatric side effects associated with the antimalarial drug mefloquine hydrochloride. A boxed warning, the most serious kind of warning about these potential problems, has been added to the drug label. FDA has revised the patient Medication Guide dispensed with each prescription and wallet card to include this information and the possibility that the neurologic side effects may persist or become permanent. The neurologic side effects can include dizziness, loss of balance, or ringing in the ears. The psychiatric side effects can include feeling anxious, mistrustful, depressed, or having hallucinations. Neurologic side effects can occur at any time during drug use, and can last for months to years after the drug is stopped or can be permanent. See the Drug Safety Communication for more ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Mefloquine, Lariam

Mosquitoes With Altered Gene Can't Sniff People Out

Posted 29 May 2013 by

WEDNESDAY, May 29 – Scientists have discovered that mutating a smell-related gene in mosquitoes hinders their ability to sniff out humans from other warm-blooded prey. Researchers said the findings, published May 27 in the journal Nature, clearly show how important scent is to mosquito "hunting preferences." And they hope the results will pave the way to better weapons against the mosquitoes that transmit diseases including malaria and dengue fever. It's well known that certain mosquitoes "specialize in humans," said Leslie Vosshall, a professor at Rockefeller University, in New York City, and senior researcher on the study. Because they devote their time to moving from one person to the next, she said, they are the mosquitoes responsible for spreading diseases such as malaria – which alone killed close to 700,000 people worldwide in 2010, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

Malaria, Typhoid Pose Biggest Threat to Travelers in Tropics

Posted 18 Jan 2013 by

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 – Malaria and typhoid fever – not the much-feared Ebola virus – are the biggest health threats for travelers to tropical regions of the world, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed data from more than 80,000 people in Australia, Europe, Israel, Japan, New Zealand and North America who sought medical care after traveling to the tropics between 1996 and 2011. More than 3,600 (4.4 percent) of the patients had one of 13 life-threatening diseases. Thirteen of the patients died, including 10 with malaria, according to the study, which was published online Jan. 16 in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Malaria accounted for nearly 77 percent of the diagnoses, followed by fevers such as typhoid fever (18 percent) and leptospirosis (2.4 percent). Malaria is caused by a parasite spread by the bite of infected female mosquitoes. Typhoid fever is ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Typhoid Fever, Malaria Prophylaxis, Typhoid Prophylaxis

HIV Drug Combo May Help Prevent Malaria Reinfection

Posted 29 Nov 2012 by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 – Treatment with a combination of certain HIV drugs greatly reduces the risk of recurrent malaria in children with HIV who are also being treated with drugs to prevent the mosquito-borne infection, according to new research. The study included more than 170 HIV-positive infants and children up to 6 years old in Uganda who were receiving anti-malarial drugs and HIV treatment, including either a combination of the protease inhibitors lopinavir and ritonavir, or a class of drugs called non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Despite the anti-malarial drugs and other preventive measures – such as mosquito nets – the children's risk of developing malaria during their first six months of HIV treatment was more than 40 percent. The risk during that time period was about the same whether the children were taking the protease inhibitors or an NNRTI, the ... Read more

Related support groups: HIV Infection, Malaria, Incivek, Malaria Prevention, Victrelis, Kaletra, Norvir, Telaprevir, Malaria Prophylaxis, Nevirapine, Efavirenz, Boceprevir, Reyataz, Lexiva, Norvir Soft Gelatin, Ritonavir, Prezista, Agenerase, Indinavir, Sustiva

Children Usually Excluded From Clinical Drug Trials: Study

Posted 30 Apr 2012 by

MONDAY, April 30 – Children are more likely than adults to suffer from a number of diseases, but few clinical trials are conducted to test new drugs in children with these conditions, researchers have found. In a new study, researchers looked at all clinical trials registered worldwide from 2006 to 2011 for drugs to treat these common conditions: asthma, migraine headaches, schizophrenia, depression, diarrheal illness, lower respiratory infection, malaria, bipolar disorder and HIV/AIDS. While children account for 60 percent of the patients with these conditions, only 12 percent of the clinical drug trials involved children, the investigators found. The gap was widest for conditions that are widespread in low- and middle-income countries. Clinical drug trials in children are important because youngsters often respond differently to medications than adults, the study authors pointed out ... Read more

Related support groups: Bipolar Disorder, Migraine, Diarrhea, Asthma, Schizophrenia, HIV Infection, Malaria

Older Travelers at Much Higher Risk of Dying From Malaria

Posted 28 Mar 2012 by

WEDNESDAY, March 28 – Tourists over age 65 who visit malaria-infested regions are nearly 10 times more likely to die from the disease than those ages 18 to 35, a new study says. The analysis of 20 years of data from more than 25,000 U.K. patients also found that the malaria death rate is particularly high among people who've traveled to Gambia, West Africa. The risk of dying from malaria, an infection carried by mosquitoes, increased with age, and the death rate for those over age 65 was 4.6 percent. There were no deaths in children younger than age 5, according to the study published online March 28 in the British Medical Journal. The researchers also found that tourists were more than nine times more likely to die from malaria than people of African heritage who traveled to see family or friends – 3 percent vs. 0.32 percent. This decreased death risk among people of African heritage ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

Malaria's Global Death Toll Much Higher Than Thought

Posted 3 Feb 2012 by

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 – Malaria killed 1.2 million people worldwide in 2010, a figure nearly double other estimates, a new study says. The researchers also said that although most malaria deaths occur in very young children, 42 percent of deaths occurred in children over age 5 and adults. The findings are published in the Feb. 4 edition of The Lancet. According to the analysis of data collected from 1980 to 2010, global malaria deaths rose from 1 million in 1980 to a peak of 1.8 million in 2004. Since then, increased malaria intervention efforts have helped to reduce malaria death rates, Christopher Murray, of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues noted in journal news release. The 1.2 million malaria deaths in 2010 was a 32 percent decrease from the number of malaria deaths in 2004, the authors noted. In 2010, there were ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

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